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Collection Number: 04007

Collection Title: Southern Oral History Program Collection, 1973-2015

This collection has access restrictions. For details, please see the restrictions.

This collection has use restrictions. For details, please see the restrictions.

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held in the Wilson Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the World Wide Web. See the section for more information.


expand/collapse Expand/collapse Collection Overview

Size circa 5900 interviews and circa 11,000 additional items
Abstract In 1973, the History Department of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill established an oral history program devoted to the study of the southern region of the United States. The Southern Oral History Program collects interviews with Southerners who have made significant contributions to various fields of human endeavor. In addition, the Program undertakes special projects with the purpose of rendering historically visible those whose experience is not reflected in traditional written sources. Interviews are conducted by Program staff, graduate students, faculty members, and consultants. The Program also serves as a collecting agency, accepting donations of tapes and transcripts of interviews conducted by other researchers. The collection includes sound recordings of interviews conducted under the auspices of the Southern Oral History Program or by other researchers, who donated their recordings to the Program. Also included are transcripts of most interviews, abstracts or tape indexes of many interviews, introductory biographical sketches or other supplemental materials for some individual interviews or groups of interviews, and photographs of a few interviewees.
Creator Southern Oral History Program.
Language English.
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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Information For Users

Restrictions to Access
Some interviews are restricted or closed as noted.
Restrictions to Use
The Southern Oral History Program (SOHP) welcomes non-commercial use and access that qualifies as fair use as stipulated by U.S. Copyright law to all unrestricted interview materials in the collection. The researcher must cite and give proper credit to the SOHP. The SOHP requests that the researcher informs the SOHP as to how and where they are using the material. Please use the online form available on the SOHP site to request permission and inform the SOHP of your use.
Preferred Citation
Interview with [interviewee name] by [interviewer name], [interview date] [interview number], in the Southern Oral History Program Collection #4007, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Example: Interview with Katharine DuPre Lumpkin by Jacquelyn Hall, 4 August 1974 (G-34), in the Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007), Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Provenance
Transferred from the Southern Oral History Program beginning in the 1970s.
Additional Descriptive Resources
Database: A searchable database of all Southern Oral History Program interviews is available at http://www.lib.unc.edu/dc/sohp/. Patrons may keyword search the database by: (1) Abstract; (2) Transcript; (3) Interviewee name; (4) Interviewer name; (5) Interview number; or (6) Subject term. Patrons may browse the database by: (1) Interviewee name; (2) Interviewer name; (3) Interviewee occupation; (4) Interviewee ethnicity; or (5) Project.
Sensitive Materials Statement
Manuscript collections and archival records may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations, the North Carolina Public Records Act (N.C.G.S. § 132 1 et seq.), and Article 7 of the North Carolina State Personnel Act (Privacy of State Employee Personnel Records, N.C.G.S. § 126-22 et seq.). Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill assumes no responsibility.
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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subject Headings

The following terms from Library of Congress Subject Headings suggest topics, persons, geography, etc. interspersed through the entire collection; the terms do not usually represent discrete and easily identifiable portions of the collection--such as folders or items.

Clicking on a subject heading below will take you into the University Library's online catalog.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Historical Information

In September 1973, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill established an oral history program devoted to the study of the southern region. The Southern Oral History Program is engaged in the collection of interviews with individuals in North Carolina and in the South who have made significant contributions to various fields of human endeavor. In addition, the Program undertakes special projects with the purpose of rendering historically visible those whose consciousness and experience are not reflected in traditional written sources. The result is the preservation of information that exists only in the minds of living men and women, material which, if unrecorded, would soon be lost.

The Program has established projects in several areas-- individual biographies, southern women, workers and labor movements, contemporary politics, and North Carolina social history. In addition, the Program serves as a collecting agency; tapes and transcripts are donated to the Program by other researchers.

In 1994, a gift from Walter Royal Davis enabled the Southern Oral History Program and the Academic Affairs Library to establish the Davis Oral History Fund and to launch five projects aimed at understanding how North Carolinians have dealt with the changes that have transformed the state since the Great Depression. These projects focus on University history; North Carolina politics; business history; women's leadership and grassroots activism; and memory and community studies.

Interviews done directly under the auspices of the Southern Oral History Program are conducted by Program staff, graduate students, faculty members, and consultants. The structure of the interview depends on its purposes. In some cases, lengthy biographical memoirs are undertaken. In others, interviews focus only on the specific aspects of the respondent's experience that bear on the historical concerns of the interviewer.

Transcripts are available for many of the interviews. Inaudible phrases may be indicated in the transcripts by a blank space, appearing: ( ) . Ellipses indicate a pause in speech. False starts are omitted and punctuation is added for the sake of clarity. It should be noted that transcripts vary somewhat in style and appearance. Early transcripts were corrected by hand; in later ones, corrections have been typewritten. Abstracts or tape indexes exist for many interviews, and introductory biographical sketches have been prepared for some interviews. Some transcripts were returned to the interviewee for approval. If necessary, a revised transcript was prepared. In cases where transcripts have been significantly rewritten, a note to that effect is appended.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Scope and Content

Photographs and other related materials: A few interviews or interview series have related photographs, notes, or other materials. The existence of these materials is noted in the series or item description as appropriate.

Using the collection: The Southern Oral History Program views oral history not as an end in itself, but as an additional tool for exploring social life in past times. Interviews constitute primary source material, retrospective evidence of individual experiences and perceptions. Those who use the Program's tapes or transcripts are cautioned to bring to them the same rules of evidence applied to other forms of historical documentation, testing one interview against another as well as against written sources. The Program makes no representation as to the factual accuracy of a memoir; the scholar judges for him or herself.

For each series, the Program supplies an introduction describing the purpose and origin of the series. Each series is assigned a letter and each interview within the series is assigned a unique number within its series (e.g., A-1, B-1). Arrangement of the interviews within each series varies. Researchers should include both letter and number when requesting interviews.

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Contents list

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A. Southern Politics.
A.1. Southern Politics: Bass-De Vries Interviews, 1973-1975.
A.2. Southern Politics: Southern Liberalism, 1990-1991.
A.3. Southern Politics: North Carolina Politics, 1995-1997.
B. Individual Biographies.
B.1. Individual Biographies: General.
B.2. Individual Biographies: Interviews with a Special Focus.
B.2.1. Individual Biographies: Interviews with a Special Focus: Idea of the American South Project.
B.2.2. Individual Biographies: Interviews with a Special Focus: Racial Violence in Wilmington Project.
B.2.3. Individual Biographies: Interviews with a Special Focus: African Americans in Durham Project.
B.2.4. Individual Biographies: Interviews with a Special Focus: Politicians in Charlotte Project.
B.2.5. Individual Biographies: Interviews with a Special Focus: Hosea Hudson Project.
B.2.6. Individual Biographies: Interviews with a Special Focus: Women's History Course Project.
B.3. Individual Biographies: General, 2014-.
C. Notable North Carolinians.
C.1. Notable North Carolinians: Individual Biographies.
C.2. Notable North Carolinians: Religion and Politics in North Carolina Project.
C.3. Notable North Carolinians: Research Triangle Park Project.
C.4. Notable North Carolinians: Pearsall Project.
C.5. Notable North Carolinians: Kenan Project.
C.6. Notable North Carolinians: Women in Politics Project.
C.7. Notable North Carolinians: Raleigh Roots Project.
C.8. Notable North Carolinians: University of North Carolina School of Law Oral History Project.
C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project.
C.10. Notable North Carolinians: Wildacres Leadership Initiative Interview Project.
C.11. Notable North Carolinians: Henry Toole Clark, Jr., M.D.
C.12. Notable North Carolinians: Katharine Parker Freeman and L. E. M. (Lemuel Elmer MacMillan) Freeman.
C.13. Notable North Carolinians: Helms Documentary Project.
C.14. Notable North Carolinians: Ethelene McCabe Allen.
C.15. Notable North Carolinians: North Carolina Governors.
D. Rural Electrification, 1984-1985.
E. Labor.
E.1. Labor: Labor History.
E.2. Labor: Miners for Democracy.
E.3. Labor: Italo-American Community Project.
E.4. Labor: University of North Carolina Foodworkers' Strikes, 1974-1975, 1979.
E.5. Labor: Civil Rights Unionism.
E.6. Labor: Michael Honey Collection on Southern Labor History.
F. Fellowship of Southern Churchmen, 1983-1985.
G. Southern Women.
G.1. Southern Women: Individual Biographies.
G.2. Southern Women: Interviews with a Special Focus.
G.2.1. Southern Women: Interviews with a Special Focus: American Women in Medicine Project.
G.2.2. Southern Women: Interviews with a Special Focus: Black and White Women in Atlanta Public Life Project.
G.2.3. Southern Women: Interviews with a Special Focus: Women's Leadership and Grassroots Activism Project.
G.2.4. Southern Women: Interviews with a Special Focus: Women Workers at the Jerold Plant, Smithfield, N.C.
G.3. Southern Women: Hope and Dignity: Older Black Women of the South.
H. Piedmont Industrialization, 1974-1980.
H. Supplementary Materials
H.1. Piedmont Industrialization: Badin, N.C.
H.2. Piedmont Industrialization: Burlington, N.C.
H.3. Piedmont Industrialization: Bynum, N.C.
H.4. Piedmont Industrialization: Catawba, N.C.
H.5. Piedmont Industrialization: Charlotte, N.C.
H.6. Piedmont Industrialization: Durham, N.C.
H.7. Piedmont Industrialization: Greenville, S.C.
H.8. Piedmont Industrialization: Piedmont, Miscellaneous.
H.9. Piedmont Industrialization: Farmville, N.C.
H.10. Piedmont Industrialization: Elizabethton, Tenn.
H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files.
I. Business History.
I.1. Hostile Takeover Project.
I.2. North Carolina Business History Project.
I.3. Hickory Springs Manufacturing Company.
J. Legal Professions.
K. Southern Communities.
K.1. Individual Projects.
K.1.1. Cane Creek Project.
K.1.2. Coastal Carolina Project.
K.1.3. White Furniture Company of Mebane Project.
K.1.4. Hindu Temple in Morrisville Project.
K.1.5. Mountain Voices.
K.1.6. Chatham Voices.
K.1.7 Green River Heritage Area.
K.1.8. Southern Communities: Our Stories, In Focus: Chapel Hill/Carrboro.
K.1.9. Southern Communities: Wilson County During the Depression.
K.1.10. Southern Communities: Desegregating Cary.
K.2. Listening for a Change.
K.2.1. Overview Project.
K.2.2. Listening for a Change: New Immigrants Project.
K.2.3. Listening for a Change: Jewish Immigrants Project.
K.2.4. Listening for a Change: Cooleemee Project.
K.2.5. Listening for a Change: West Charlotte High School Project.
K.2.6. Listening for a Change: Cary Heritage Museum's Oral History Project.
K.2.7. Listening for a Change: History of Gay Men and Transgender People in the South.
K.2.8. Listening for a Change: History 170, Oral History Course Project: Desegregation and the Inner Life of Chapel Hill Schools.
K.2.9. Listening for a Change: Tobacco, History, and Memory: Storytelling and Cultural Grieving in Eastern North Carolina.
K.2.10. Listening for a Change: Segregation and Integration of North Carolina Athletics Programs.
K.2.11. Listening for a Change: Tradition and Development in Madison County's I-26 Corridor.
K.2.12. Listening for a Change: Cambodian Community in Greensboro, N.C.
K.2.13. Listening for a Change: Voices after the Deluge: Oral History Investigations of the Great North Carolina Flood.
K.2.14. Listening for a Change: School Desegregation: Davidson Student Interviews.
K.2.15. Listening for a Change: School Desegregation: Davidson-Johnson C. Smith Student Interviews.
K.2.16. Listening for a Change: School Desegregation in Charlotte, N.C.
K.2.17. Listening for a Change: Asian Voices.
K.2.18. Listening for a Change: Southern Louisiana Environmentalism.
K.2.19. Listening for a Change: Stephens-Lee High School, Asheville, N.C.
K.2.20. Listening for a Change: Mighty Tigers--Oral Histories of Chapel Hill's Lincoln High School.
K.2.21. Listening for a Change: Terra Ceia Community.
K.2.22. Listening for a Change: North Carolina Churches.
K.2.23. African Americans in Georgia.
K.2.24. The Maya of Morganton.
L. University of North Carolina.
L.1. University of North Carolina: Individual Biographies.
L.2. University of North Carolina: Anne Queen and the Campus Y.
L.3. University of North Carolina: Women's Sports at UNC.
L.4. University of North Carolina: UNC School of Law.
L.5. University of North Carolina: UNC School of Public Health.
L.6. University of North Carolina: UNC Historians Project.
L.7. University of North Carolina: William Friday Project.
L.8. University of North Carolina: Albert Coates Project.
L.9. University of North Carolina: William Friday Documentary Project.
L.10. University of North Carolina: University Faculty and Diversity, 1960-1990.
L.11. University of North Carolina: School of Medicine and UNC Hospitals.
L.11.1. University of North Carolina: UNC Hospital Volunteer Association Board.
L.11.2. University of North Carolina: North Carolina Memorial Hospital Oral History Project.
L.12. University of North Carolina: Reflections on University Leadership.
L.13. University of North Carolina: North Carolina Area Health Education Centers (AHEC).
L.14. University of North Carolina: Kenan Professors.
M. Black High School Principals.
N. Undergraduate Internship Program.
N.1. Undergraduate Internship Program: Fall 2012.
N.2. Undergraduate Internship Program: Spring 2013.
N.3. Undergraduate Internship Program: Fall 2013.
N.4. Undergraduate Internship Program: Spring 2014.
O. Foundation History: North Carolina Fund.
Q. African American Life and Culture.
R. Special Research Projects.
R.1. Special Research Projects: War on Poverty in North Carolina.
R.2. Special Research Projects: Latinos in North Carolina.
R.3. Special Research Projects: Hindu Community in the Raleigh-Durham Area.
R.4. Special Research Projects: Integration and Health Care in North Carolina.
R.5. Special Research Projects: Lily May Ledford.
R.6. Special Research Projects: The African American Working Class, 1930s-1950s.
R.7. Special Research Projects: Gateway Transitional Families Program.
R.8. Special Research Projects: North Carolina Communities: Montagnard Refugees from Vietnam.
R.9. Special Research Projects: Contemporary Funeral Traditions in the Gullah Community of St. Helena, S.C.
R.10. Special Research Projects: Carol Woods Retirement Community, Chapel Hill, N.C.
R.11. Special Research Projects: Life Review (1997).
R.12. Special Research Projects: Life Review (2000).
R.13. Special Research Projects: Middle Eastern Immigrants in North Carolina.
R.14. Special Research Projects: African American Converts to the Mormon Faith.
R.15. Special Research Projects: New Hope Community.
R.16. Special Research Projects: Remembering Black Main Streets.
R.17. Special Research Projects: Tobacco Interviews, Duke Homestead Education and History.
R.18. Special Research Projects: Bruce Hartford.
R.19. Special Research Projects: Matzoh Ball Gumbo: Culinary Tales of the Jewish South, 1998-2001.
R.20. Special Research Projects: WakeMed History Project.
R.21. Special Research Projects: Shattering the Glass: The Remarkable History of Women's Basketball.
R.22. Special Research Projects: Julian Bond.
R.23. Special Research Projects: Lemuel Delany, Jr.
R.24. Special Research Projects: Tom Davenport
R.25. Special Research Projects: The Women's Movement and North Carolina Churches.
R.26. Special Research Projects: Northside Community Association, Chapel Hill, N.C.
R.27. Special Research Projects: Archie Green Interviews.
R.28. Special Research Projects: Military Dissenters: Veterans, Military Families, and the Iraq and Afghan Wars.
R.29. Special Research Projects: Providence Cooperative Farm.
R.30. Special Research Projects: Oral History and the Study of the Modern South.
R.31. Special Research Projects: Raleigh News and Observer.
R.32. Special Research Projects: Carrboro Farmers' Market Project.
R.33. Special Research Projects: Documenting the Gulf Oil Spill.
R.34. Special Research Projects: New Roots.
R.35. Special Research Projects: Louanne Watley.
R.36. Special Research Projects: Johnson Intern Program.
R.37. Special Research Projects: Oral History Research by Pete Daniel.
R.38. Special Research Projects: Institute for Southern Studies.
R.39. Special Research Projects: Legacy of William Friday.
R.40. Special Research Projects: Work and Cook and Eat: Lumbee Foodways of Robeson County, N.C.
R.41. Special Research Projects: Tobe: Visions of Childhood, Race, and Rural Life in Children's Literature.
R.43. Special Research Projects: NewStories
R.44. Special Research Projects: Carolina Cooks, Carolina Eats
R.45. Special Research Projects: Moral Mondays
R.46. Special Research Projects: Tuscarora Artists
S. Center for Creative Leadership.
U. The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s.
U.1. Individual Biographies.
U.2. School Desegregation in Robeson County, N.C.
U.3. School Desegregation in Birmingham, Ala.
U.4. School Desegregation in Louisville, Ky.
U.5. Memphis Civil Rights and Politics.
U.6. Remembering Bombingham, Remaking Birmingham.
U.7. Economic Justice in Charlotte, N.C.
U.8. Economic Justice in Louisville, Ky.
U.9. Economic Justice in Birmingham, Ala.
U.10. Hillside High School.
U.11. Gender and Sexuality.
U.12. Imagining New Orleans.
U.13. Oral History and the Modern South.
U.14. Preserving the African American Experience in Pamlico County, N.C.
U.15. Economic Justice in Charleston, S.C.
U.16. The Women's Movement in the South.
U.17. The 50th Anniversary of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).
U.18. Heirs to a Fighting Tradition.
U.19. Breaking New Ground.
V. The Hayti Spectrum: Documenting Negro Life of the 1920s, '30s, and '40s in Durham, N.C.
W. LGBTQ Life in the South
W.1. LGBTQ Life in the South: LGBTQ Activism in the North Carolina Triangle Area
W.2. LGBTQ Life in the South: Sweet Tea Interviews by E. Patrick Johnson

expand/collapse Expand/collapse A. Southern Politics.

558 items.

This series contains interviews conducted for three different projects: A.001. Bass-De Vries interviews (original deposit, appendix, and additional interviews) for The Transformation of Southern Politics: Social Change and Political Consequence Since 1945 ; A.002. Southern Liberalism interviews by John Egerton; A.003. North Carolina Politics interviews.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse A.1. Southern Politics: Bass-De Vries Interviews, 1973-1975.

463 items.

The Bass-De Vries group of interviews includes discussions with political leaders, journalists, editors, party officials, political scientists, campaign directors, union officials, civil rights leaders, and congress people from Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia. These interviews were conducted as part of a study of politics in the South between 1945 and 1974 that resulted in The Transformation of Southern Politics: Social Change and Political Consequence Since 1945 (Basic Books, 1976). Some of these interviews are exclusively related to the impact of the civil rights movement, black political participation, the rise of the Republican Party, and the results of industrialization and urbanization. Others include information on a broad range of events and movements.

Interviews with leaders of regional importance, civil rights activists, and those persons who exercised political power over long spans of time are of particular interest. Also included are a group of interviews, largely conducted by the Southern Oral History Program (SOHP) and other University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC Chapel Hill) groups, that expand on those collected by Bass and De Vries. Among these are in-depth biographical memoirs of national figures, regional commentators, state party leaders, and local officials. In addition to discussing political issues, each interview aims at revealing the forces that shape the lives of public people--family culture, childhood experiences, education, self-concepts, and early political involvements. The process of political decision-making is also examined.

Bass and De Vries interviewed more than 300 respondents from 1973 through 1975. Through a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation, the Southern Oral History Program provided transcripts for 215 of the most important interviews. Some of these interviews are exclusively related to the themes in The Transformation of Southern Politics: the impact of the civil rights movement, black political participation, the rise of the Republican Party, and the results of industrialization and urbanization. Others include information on a broad range of events and movements. Interviews with leaders of regional importance, civil rights activists, and those persons who exercised political power over long spans of time are of particular interest.

Jack Solomon Bass (1936- ) is a political reporter. He received a B.A. degree in journalism from the University of South Carolina and was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University. From 1966 to 1973, he served as Columbia, S.C., bureau chief for the Charlotte Observer. He is the author of Porgy Comes Home: South Carolina After 300 Years (1972) and other books. Walter De Vries (1931- ) is a political consultant. He received his Ph.D. degree in political science from Michigan State University. From 1962 to 1967, he was executive assistant to Governor George Romney of Michigan. Since 1973, he has served as associate professor in the Institute of Political Sciences and Public Affairs at Duke University. He is also director of the North Carolina Institute of Politics.

The additional interviews expand on those collected by Bass and De Vries through in-depth biographical memoirs of national figures, regional commentators, state party leaders, and local officials. In addition to discussing political issues, each interview aims at revealing the forces that shape the lives of public people-family, culture, childhood experiences, education, self-concepts, and early political involvements. The process of political decision-making is also examined. Most of these interviews were conducted by the Southern Oral History Program and students and faculty of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Interviews

Southern Politics: Bass-De Vries Interviews #04007, Subseries: "A.1. Southern Politics: Bass-De Vries Interviews, 1973-1975." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse A.2. Southern Politics: Southern Liberalism, 1990-1991.

35 items.

These interviews were conducted in late 1990 and early 1991 by John Egerton as part of the research for a book on the post-World War II era and the opportunities that era presented for positive action on civil rights. Many interviews are with individuals who were involved in various ways in the civil rights struggle. In the interviews, Egerton focused on the interviewees' careers between 1945 and 1950 and their opinions of various individuals, institutions, and events. Some topics covered extensively include the New Deal and Franklin Roosevelt, the University of North Carolina and Frank Graham, the Southern Conference for Human Welfare, and the Brown decision. Researchers should note that, at times, much of the discussion concerns Egerton's thesis about the time period and the interviewee's reaction to that thesis.

Interviews

Southern Politics: Southern Liberalism, 1990-1991 #04007, Subseries: "A.2. Southern Politics: Southern Liberalism, 1990-1991." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse A.3. Southern Politics: North Carolina Politics, 1995-1997.

60 items.

These interviews are part of a North Carolina politics project begun in 1994 aimed at understanding how North Carolinians have dealt with the changes that have transformed the state since the Great Depression. The overarching themes of the interviews are the realignment in North Carolina party politics and the Republican reemergence; the evolution of African American political activity in North Carolina since the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965; the evolution of women's political activity in North Carolina since the 1960s; and the centrality of cultural and social politics in the state's political contests and debates in the same time period. These projects were launched with a gift from Walter Royal Davis which enabled the Southern Oral History Program and the Academic Affairs Library to establish the Davis Oral History Fund. The other projects focus on University history; women's leadership and grassroots activism; business history; the broadcast media; and memory and community studies.

Project coordinator for the North Carolina politics project is William Link of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. The majority of the interviews were conducted by Joseph Mosnier, a graduate student in history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Other interviews were conducted by Jonathan Houghton as part of his dissertation research on the history of the Republican Party in North Carolina or by Howard Covington and Marion Ellis. The overarching themes of the interviews, particularly those by Mosnier, are the realignment in North Carolina party politics and the Republican reemergence; the evolution of African American political activity in North Carolina since the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965; the evolution of women's political activity in North Carolina since the 1960s; and the centrality of cultural and social politics in the state's political contests and debates in the same time period.

Interviews

Southern Politics: North Carolina Politics, 1995-1997 #04007, Subseries: "A.3. Southern Politics: North Carolina Politics, 1995-1997." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse B. Individual Biographies.

117 items.

This series contains recordings of biographical interviews conducted by the staff of the SOHP and others, intended to address the contemporary dearth of personal letters and diaries written by notable citizens. Interviews with educators, business leaders, political activists, professional workers, authors, and artists, as well as with homemakers, tobacco workers, and domestic servants, are included. Although biographical in nature, the interviews may also concentrate on specific events or periods in which the respondent was involved. In some cases there is more than one interview with a given individual, each relating to a different aspect of his or her career. Included is a series of interviews relating to African-American communist Hosea Hudson.

The collection of biographical interviews is an ongoing project of the Southern Oral History Program. This project seeks to restore the balance personal letters and diaries, which are becoming increasingly scarce, once brought to the public record, by interviewing notable men and women in North Carolina and the southern region. Interviews with educators, business leaders, political activists, professional workers, and authors and artists are included in this series.

The interviews have been conducted by the program staff and by students and faculty whose research in southern history utilized oral sources. The interviews are biographical in nature, although they may concentrate on specific events or periods within the lifetime of the respondent. In some cases there is more than one interview with an individual, each covering a different aspect of his or her career. A biographical sketch is often filed with each interview, or with the first interview if there are several for one individual.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse B.1. Individual Biographies: General.

77 items.

This series contains recordings of biographical interviews conducted by the staff of the SOHP and others, intended to address the contemporary dearth of personal letters and diaries written by notable citizens. Interviews with educators, business leaders, political activists, professional workers, authors, and artists, as well as with homemakers, tobacco workers, and domestic servants, are included. Although biographical in nature, the interviews may also concentrate on specific events or periods in which the respondent was involved. In some cases there is more than one interview with a given individual, each relating to a different aspect of his or her career. The collection of biographical interviews is an ongoing project of the Southern Oral History Program. This project seeks to restore the balance personal letters and diaries, which are becoming increasingly scarce, once brought to the public record, by interviewing notable men and women in North Carolina and the southern region. Interviews with educators, business leaders, political activists, professional workers, and authors and artists are included in this series. The interviews have been conducted by the program staff and by students and faculty whose research in southern history utilized oral sources. The interviews are biographical in nature, although they may concentrate on specific events or periods within the lifetime of the respondent. In some cases there is more than one interview with an individual, each covering a different aspect of his or her career.

Interviews

Individual Biographies: General #04007, Subseries: "B.1. Individual Biographies: General." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse B.2. Individual Biographies: Interviews with a Special Focus.

109 items.

The collection of biographical interviews is an ongoing project of the Southern Oral History Program. This project seeks to restore the balance personal letters and diaries, which are becoming increasingly scarce, once brought to the public record, by interviewing notable men and women in North Carolina and the southern region. Interviews with educators, business leaders, political activists, professional workers, and authors and artists are included in this series. The interviews have been conducted by the program staff and by students and faculty whose research in southern history utilized oral sources. The interviews are biographical in nature, although they may concentrate on specific events or periods within the lifetime of the respondent. In some cases there is more than one interview with an individual, each covering a different aspect of his or her career.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse B.2.1. Individual Biographies: Interviews with a Special Focus: Idea of the American South Project.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse B.2.2. Individual Biographies: Interviews with a Special Focus: Racial Violence in Wilmington Project.

4 items.

Interviews with residents of Wilmington, N.C., focus on the racial violence that erupted in February 1971 following the boycott of and demonstrations against the city's still segregated schools in the city.

Interviews

Individual Biographies: Interviews with a Special Focus: Racial Violence in Wilmington Project #04007, Subseries: "B.2.2. Individual Biographies: Interviews with a Special Focus: Racial Violence in Wilmington Project." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse B.2.3. Individual Biographies: Interviews with a Special Focus: African Americans in Durham Project.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse B.2.4. Individual Biographies: Interviews with a Special Focus: Politicians in Charlotte Project.

10 items.

William T. Moye conducted interviews with Charlotte, N.C., politicians in 1974 and 1975 for his dissertation, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Consolidation: Metrolina in Motion (UNC Chapel Hill, 1975).

Interviews

Individual Biographies: Interviews with a Special Focus: Politicians in Charlotte Project #04007, Subseries: "B.2.4. Individual Biographies: Interviews with a Special Focus: Politicians in Charlotte Project." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse B.2.5. Individual Biographies: Interviews with a Special Focus: Hosea Hudson Project.

80 items.

Tapes, transcripts, and other materials relating to Hosea Hudson (1898- ), African American Communist Party member, labor organizer, and author of Black Worker in the Deep South (1972). The tapes were recorded and transcribed between 1976 and 1978 by Nell Irvin Painter, in connection with The Narrative of Hosea Hudson: His Life as a Negro Communist in the South (Harvard University Press, 1979), which covers Hudson's life from 1917 to 1947.

Interviews

Individual Biographies: Interviews with a Special Focus: Hosea Hudson Project #04007, Subseries: "B.2.5. Individual Biographies: Interviews with a Special Focus: Hosea Hudson Project." Interviews

Folder B1

Hudson's FBI file, 1941-1949 #04007, Subseries: "B.2.5. Individual Biographies: Interviews with a Special Focus: Hosea Hudson Project." Folder B1

Folder B2

Two narratives by Hudson. #04007, Subseries: "B.2.5. Individual Biographies: Interviews with a Special Focus: Hosea Hudson Project." Folder B2

Folder B3

A narrative by Al Murphy documenting his early life in Georgia and Alabama and subsequent career as a southern black communist #04007, Subseries: "B.2.5. Individual Biographies: Interviews with a Special Focus: Hosea Hudson Project." Folder B3

Folder B4

Correspondence relating to the editing and publication of The Narrative of Hosea Hudson #04007, Subseries: "B.2.5. Individual Biographies: Interviews with a Special Focus: Hosea Hudson Project." Folder B4

Image P-4007/B1

Hosea Hudson and family #04007, Subseries: "B.2.5. Individual Biographies: Interviews with a Special Focus: Hosea Hudson Project." P-4007/B1

Image P-4007/B2

Hosea Hudson, Philadelphia, 1934 #04007, Subseries: "B.2.5. Individual Biographies: Interviews with a Special Focus: Hosea Hudson Project." P-4007/B2

Image P-4007/B3

Al Murphy, 1977 #04007, Subseries: "B.2.5. Individual Biographies: Interviews with a Special Focus: Hosea Hudson Project." P-4007/B3

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse B.2.6. Individual Biographies: Interviews with a Special Focus: Women's History Course Project.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse B.3. Individual Biographies: General, 2014-.

items.

Interviews were conducted from 2014 onward by SOHP staff and outside researchers. Individuals discuss their life stories.

Interviews

Individual Biographies: General, 2014- #04007, Subseries: "B.3. Individual Biographies: General, 2014-." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse C. Notable North Carolinians.

370 items.

Notable North Carolinians is an ongoing project to interview men and women in North Carolina who have made significant contributions to business, the arts, education, and politics.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse C.1. Notable North Carolinians: Individual Biographies.

83 items.

Interviews are with men and women in North Carolina who have made significant contributions to business, the arts, education, and politics.

Interviews

Notable North Carolinians: Individual Biographies #04007, Subseries: "C.1. Notable North Carolinians: Individual Biographies." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse C.2. Notable North Carolinians: Religion and Politics in North Carolina Project.

5 items.

Interviews on religion and politics in North Carolina were conducted by Bruce Kalk, a graduate student in history at UNC Chapel Hill.

Interviews

Notable North Carolinians: Religion and Politics in North Carolina Project #04007, Subseries: "C.2. Notable North Carolinians: Religion and Politics in North Carolina Project." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse C.3. Notable North Carolinians: Research Triangle Park Project.

8 items.

Interviews on the development of Research Triangle Park were conducted by graduate student Mary Virginia Jones.

Interviews

Notable North Carolinians: Research Triangle Park Project #04007, Subseries: "C.3. Notable North Carolinians: Research Triangle Park Project." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse C.4. Notable North Carolinians: Pearsall Project.

7 items.

Funded by a University Research Grant, these interviews focus on the Pearsall Plan for school desegregation in North Carolina, which was proposed by Thomas Pearsall.

A transcription of the "Session on the History of the Integration Situation in North Carolina," 3 September 1960, in Governor Luther Hodges's office, is included with the interviews. Principal speakers at this session were Governor Hodges and Thomas Pearsall.

Interviews

Notable North Carolinians: Pearsall Project #04007, Subseries: "C.4. Notable North Carolinians: Pearsall Project." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse C.5. Notable North Carolinians: Kenan Project.

9 items.

Funded by the Kenan Foundation, interviews center on the life of William Rand Kenan, who made numerous contributions to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill through various Kenan family trusts.

Interviews

Notable North Carolinians: Kenan Project #04007, Subseries: "C.5. Notable North Carolinians: Kenan Project." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse C.6. Notable North Carolinians: Women in Politics Project.

10 items.

Funded by a grant from the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, the Women in Politics interviews are with women who have been prominent in North Carolina political life including women legislators, women mayors, women judges, and women state administrators.

Interviews

Notable North Carolinians: Women in Politics Project #04007, Subseries: "C.6. Notable North Carolinians: Women in Politics Project." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse C.7. Notable North Carolinians: Raleigh Roots Project.

4 items.

Funded by a grant from the North Carolina Humanities Council, interviews were conducted by the staff of the Raleigh Historic Properties Commission with older members of the Raleigh, N.C., community. Interviews focus on Raleigh's history, especially that of its African American community, and significant architecture within the traditionally black communities.

Interviews

Notable North Carolinians: Raleigh Roots Project #04007, Subseries: "C.7. Notable North Carolinians: Raleigh Roots Project." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse C.8. Notable North Carolinians: University of North Carolina School of Law Oral History Project.

12 items.

As part of their legal training, law students at the University of North Carolina School of Law conducted interviews with prominent North Carolina attorneys and judges during spring semester, 1992. These interviews were undertaken as part of a course taught by Walter H. Bennett, Jr., associate professor of law. Bennett himself conducted the interview with James B. McMillan. The interviews were subsequently transcribed at the Law School and donated to the Southern Oral History Program Collection.

Interviews

Notable North Carolinians: University of North Carolina School of Law Oral History #04007, Subseries: "C.8. Notable North Carolinians: University of North Carolina School of Law Oral History Project." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project.

148 items.

Interviews were conducted by Ben F. Bulla for his biography of B. Everett Jordan. The book titled Textiles and Politics: The Life of B. Everett Jordan: From Saxapahaw to the United States Senate was published in 1992 by Carolina Academic Press. Bulla interviewed family members, friends, political associates, business associates, and employees of Jordan.

Interviews

Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Interviews

Folder C1

50th anniversary #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C1

Folder C2

Arledge, Esther Jordan #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C2

Folder C3

Baker, Bobby and others #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C3

Folder C4

Blurbs for jacket #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C4

Folder C5

Book: B. Everett Jordan biography #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C5

Folder C6

Book: Chapter 6 turning point draft #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C6

Folder C7

Book: Early drafts and notes #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C7

Folder C8

Book: Work papers #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C8

Folder C9

Book promotion #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C9

Folder C10

Book requests #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C10

Folder C11

Books: Bibliography #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C11

Folder C12

Carolina Academic Press #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C12

Folder C13

Correspondence #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C13

Folder C14

Duke University Library #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C14

Folder C15

Duke University Research #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C15

Folder C16

Eagles, Joseph C., Jr. #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C16

Folder C17

Ferris, Robert #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C17

Folder C18

Gaston County #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C18

Folder C19

Hodges, Luther. Travel reports, 1958-1960 #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C19

Folder C20

Hogan, Judy #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C20

Folder C21

Introduction #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C21

Folder C22

Johnson, Lyndon B. #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C22

Folder C23

Jordan, Annie Sellars #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C23

Folder C24

Jordan, B. Everett: Awards #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C24

Folder C25

Jordan, B. Everett: Background #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C25

Folder C26

Jordan, B. Everett: Biographical information #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C26

Folder C27

Jordan, B. Everett: Miscellaneous #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C27

Folder C28

Jordan, B. Everett: Senate #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C28

Folder C29

Jordan, B. Everett: Reference and background #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C29

Folder C30

Jordan, B. Everett: Reference material #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C30

Folder C31

Jordan, B. Everett: Unions #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C31

Folder C33

Jordan boys #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C33

Folder C34

Jordan family letters #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C34

Folder C35

Jordan, H. H. #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C35

Folder C36

Jordan, John M. #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C36

Folder C37

Jordan Lake #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C37

Folder C38

Kimbrell, W. Duke #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C38

Folder C39

McNeil, Hayes #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C39

Folder C40

Millhands and preachers #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C40

Folder C41

Moore, Parks #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C41

Folder C42

Myers, Charles F., Jr. #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C42

Folder C43

News releases #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C43

Folder C44-C46

Newspaper clippings #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C44-C46

Folder C47

Quinney, Valerie #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C47

Folder C48

Reference material #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C48

Folder C49

Royal Cotton Mill #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C49

Folder C50

Sellars Family #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C50

Folder C51-C52

Sellars Manufacturing Company #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C51-C52

Folder C53-C54

Tapp, Roland #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C53-C54

Folder C55

UNC Press #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C55

Folder C56-C61

UNC classes #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C56-C61

Folder C62

Washington, D.C. #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C62

Folder C63

Walls, Dwayne E. #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C63

Folder C64-C78

Unedited manuscript #04007, Subseries: "C.9. Notable North Carolinians: B. Everett Jordan Project." Folder C64-C78

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse C.10. Notable North Carolinians: Wildacres Leadership Initiative Interview Project.

31 items.

Interviews were conducted between 1998 and 2000 as part of the Friday Fellows Leadership Interview Project by the Wildacres Leadership Initiative. This project was part of the William C. Friday Fellowship for Human Relations. The Friday Fellows describe the Leadership Interview Project as "...a program devoted to creating a new generation of leaders for North Carolina." By interviewing active leaders of North Carolina, they hope to spread the advice and wisdom these people have to offer. In addition, certain interviewees were encouraged to nominate "committed North Carolinians ... [for] a two year period of education and reflection on the challenges facing our North Carolina."

Interviews

Notable North Carolinians: Wildacres Leadership Initiative Interview #04007, Subseries: "C.10. Notable North Carolinians: Wildacres Leadership Initiative Interview Project." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse C.11. Notable North Carolinians: Henry Toole Clark, Jr., M.D.

16 items.

Interviews with with Henry Toole Clark, Jr., the first Administrator of Health Affairs at the University of North Carolina, were conducted by Frances Weaver between 1990 and 1998. During his tenure, the University's Division of Health Affairs grew to be one of the major university medical centers in the United States. In addition to his work at the University of North Carolina, the interviews chronicle Clark's childhood in Scotland Neck, N.C.; student days at the University of North Carolina; medical education at the University of Rochester; years as a tuberculosis patient at the Trudeau Sanatorium; and experience as a medical intern at Duke University Hospital. Toole discusses his work as director of the Vanderbilt University Hospital, consultant to the National Institutes of Health on the development of regional medical programs, director of the Connecticut Regional Medical Program, and consultant to health programs in Puerto Rico, the Netherlands, Jamaica, and elsewhere. His interviews also explore his time as faculty member at Yale University and the University of Connecticut and leadership role in Chapel Hill, N.C., community.

Interviews

Notable North Carolinians: Henry Toole Clark, Jr., M.D. #04007, Subseries: "C.11. Notable North Carolinians: Henry Toole Clark, Jr., M.D." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse C.12. Notable North Carolinians: Katharine Parker Freeman and L. E. M. (Lemuel Elmer MacMillan) Freeman.

1 item.

Katharine Parker Freeman and L. E. M. Freeman (Lemuel Elmer MacMillan Freeman) were recorded between 1970 and 1978 talking about their lives, discussing the Bible, telling stories, and singing songs from South Carolina. The Freemans were residents of Raleigh, N.C. L.E.M. Freeman was originally from South Carolina. He was a Baptist minister and taught religion at Meredith College and at Shaw University. Katharine Freeman started the home economics department at Meredith College, then resigned from teaching after her marriage. The Freemans were active in promoting racial integration from the early 1940s through the 1960s. They were members of Pullen Memorial Baptist Church and of the Fellowship of Southern Churchmen.

Interviews

Notable North Carolinians: Katharine Parker Freeman and L. E. M. (Lemuel Elmer MacMillan) Freeman #04007, Subseries: "C.12. Notable North Carolinians: Katharine Parker Freeman and L. E. M. (Lemuel Elmer MacMillan) Freeman." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse C.13. Notable North Carolinians: Helms Documentary Project.

10 items.

Interviews were conducted between 1996 and 1999 by Martin Clark, Walter Campbell, Steven Channing, and John Wilson of the Helms Documentary Project in Durham, N.C. Interviews explore former North Carolina United States Senator Jesse Helms's childhood, family life, and political career. These ten videotaped interviews are closed indefinitely.

CLOSED: These interviews are closed.

Interviews

Notable North Carolinians: Helms Documentary Project #04007, Subseries: "C.13. Notable North Carolinians: Helms Documentary Project." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse C.14. Notable North Carolinians: Ethelene McCabe Allen.

13 items.

Ethelene McCabe Allen (b. 1934) grew up in a tenant farming family in Johnston County, N.C., and Wayne County, N.C. Although she was an excellent student, she left school at age 16 to marry a small proprietary farmer and helped him farm the family land. At age 22, she began working as a sewing machine operator at the Jerold Manufacturing Co. in Smithfield, N.C., while continuing to help her husband on the family farm. Her husband became a pipe fitter and welder on construction projects, while continuing to farm part-time. After receiving her G.E.D. by exam and completing an associate's degree in college transfer classes at Johnston Community College, Allen worked as a technician at Fieldcrest Cannon in Smithfield, N.C., and at Raychem and Tyco Corp. in Fuquay-Varina, N.C. She had four children and was active in the Burnell Baptist Church as a Sunday school teacher and Girls Auxiliary leader. She volunteered with the North Carolina Bluebird Society to educate and encourage North Carolinians to help save the eastern bluebird by building bluebird houses and establishing and monitoring bluebird trails.

These interviews, conducted by her daughter Barbara C. Allen, survey her family life; social relationships; educational experiences; perspective as a woman in rural southern life and southern Baptist religious experience; her travels across the United States, Canada, and Ireland; her views on the environment, child rearing, gender roles, race, population growth and changing demographics; and her experiences as a laborer in her local area's evolving farming and manufacturing economies. Also included is one interview with Minnie Allen Lee, the interviewer's paternal aunt.

Interviews

Notable North Carolinians: Ethelene McCabe Allen #04007, Subseries: "C.14. Notable North Carolinians: Ethelene McCabe Allen." Interviews

Folder C79

Ethelene McCabe Allen #04007, Subseries: "C.14. Notable North Carolinians: Ethelene McCabe Allen." Folder C79

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse C.15. Notable North Carolinians: North Carolina Governors.

13 items.

These interviews were conducted by Jack Fleer during the course of his research for his 2007 book, Governors Speak. The interviews are with former North Carolina governors James E. Holshouser, James B. Hunt, James G. Martin, Terry Sanford, and Robert W. Scott. The interviews discuss their political careers, including decision making, campaigns, and policies.

Interviews

Notable North Carolinians: North Carolina Governors #04007, Subseries: "C.15. Notable North Carolinians: North Carolina Governors." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse D. Rural Electrification, 1984-1985.

44 items.

These interviews were conducted in rural areas of North Carolina for the 50th anniversary in 1985 of the Rural Electrification Administration. The project of the North Carolina Association of Electric Cooperatives explored the impact electricity had made in the daily lives of rural people. Respondents described ways they completed household and farm chores heated their homes, read and studied at night, and performed other everyday tasks before electricity. Most respondents also discussed the origins and development of their local electric cooperatives.

Interviews

Rural Electrification #04007, Series: "D. Rural Electrification, 1984-1985." Interviews

Folder D1

Rural Electrification Project #04007, Series: "D. Rural Electrification, 1984-1985." Folder D1

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse E. Labor.

195 items.

Interviews focus on the growth and development of organized labor in the American South and explore labor movements in mills, mines, agriculture, and the food service industry. Themes include strikes, life in mill villages, anti-unionism, and the relationship between organized labor movements and civil rights and social justice movements.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse E.1. Labor: Labor History.

22 items.

Interviews, conducted by the staff of the SOHP, focus on the growth and development of organized labor in the southeast from 1940 to the present. Respondents include leaders of textile unions in the southeast and contain much information on individual strikes, organizing tactics, problems within the unions, and difficulties with mill owners. Some respondents speak generally about life in mill villages. Many of the interviews deal with labor education because the interviewees had entered the labor movement after college through working in union labor education departments.

Interviews

Labor: Labor History #04007, Subseries: "E.1. Labor: Labor History." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse E.2. Labor: Miners for Democracy.

8 items.

Interviews, conducted by George William Hopkins for his dissertation The Miners for Democracy: Insurgency in the United Mine Workers of America, 1970-1972 (UNC Chapel Hill, 1976), focus United Mine Workers union in West Virginia between 1970 and 1972 and explore the union's internal problems and the issues that spurred the creation of the movement.

Interviews

Labor: Miners for Democracy #04007, Subseries: "E.2. Labor: Miners for Democracy." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse E.3. Labor: Italo-American Community Project.

30 items.

These interviews were conducted in a neighborhood in St. Louis, Mo., by Gary Ross Mormino for his dissertation The Hill upon the City: An Italo-American Neighborhood in St. Louis, Missouri, 1880-1955 (UNC Chapel Hill, 1977). Many are life histories that include information about the respondent's work, and thus reveal a wide range of community interests and activities.

RESTRICTED: All of these interviews are closed or restricted.

Interviews

Labor: Italo-American Community Project #04007, Subseries: "E.3. Labor: Italo-American Community Project." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse E.4. Labor: University of North Carolina Foodworkers' Strikes, 1974-1975, 1979.

37 items.

Interviews focus on the UNC Foodworkers' strikes against the UNC Food Service in February-March 1969 and against SAGA Food Service in November-December 1969. The respondents include food workers, members of the Black Student Movement, members of the Southern Student Organizing Committee, and other students, mediators, lawyers, faculty members, and university officials. The interviews establish the role of each respondent in the events and address issues of race, class, and gender that were raised by the strike. Other topics that are addressed include student protests in the 1960s, university-town relations, and the university's position in state government. These interviews focus on the University of North Carolina foodworkers' strikes against the University of North Carolina Food Service, February-March 1969, and against SAGA Food Service, November-December 1969. The participants in the strikes were primarily African American women, although many university groups ultimately became involved.

The individuals interviewed include foodworkers, members of the Black Student Movement, members of the Southern Student Organizing Committee, and other students, mediators, lawyers, faculty members, and university officials. The interviews establish the chronology and role of each participant and address the issues of class, race, and gender raised by the strikes. Other topics include student protests in the 1960s, university-town relations, and the university's position in state government. With one exception, these interviews were conducted by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill students as part of their work in History 103 (The Theory and Practice of Oral History) in 1974-1975. The exception is a 1979 interview by Derek Williams for his master's thesis, "It Wasn't Slavery Time Anymore: Foodworkers' Strike at Chapel Hill, Spring, 1969" (UNC Chapel Hill, 1980).

Interviews

Labor: University of North Carolina Foodworkers' Strikes, 1974-1975, 1979 #04007, Subseries: "E.4. Labor: University of North Carolina Foodworkers' Strikes, 1974-1975, 1979." Interviews

Folder E1

Supplementary materials: UNC Foodworkers' Strike #04007, Subseries: "E.4. Labor: University of North Carolina Foodworkers' Strikes, 1974-1975, 1979." Folder E1

Includes chronologies of the two strikes; a list of the main participants and their roles in the strikes; notes on articles that appeared in the Durham Morning Herald during both strikes; notes on interviews with Claiborne Jones, who was an assistant to the chancellor in 1969, and with James A. Branch, who was Director of Auxiliary Enterprises for the University in 1969; and a 1974 News and Observer article titled "Activists of Yesteryear: Where Are They Now?"

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse E.5. Labor: Civil Rights Unionism.

80 items.

These interviews were conducted by Robert Rodgers Korstad, Lisa Hazirjian, Karl Korstad, and Lane Windham between 1976 and 1998. For the most part, the interviewees are people who were employed by the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company (RJR) in Winston-Salem, N.C., in the first half of the 20th century, especially during the 1940s. Many of the RJR employees were organizers, leaders, or members of the Food, Tobacco, Agricultural, and Allied Workers of America (FTA) Local 22. Other interviewees are employees who were not involved in Local 22 and who may have opposed the union. Also interviewed are RJR officials and FTA organizers who were not RJR employees, but who worked with Local 22 during the 1940s. There is a special focus on the work stoppages and strikes of 1943 and 1947. The purpose of this series of interviews was to understand the organization and actions of Winston-Salem's FTA Local 22; the living conditions in the African American community in Winston-Salem in the early 1900s through the 1940s; and the role played by the Communist Party in local events during this time. Interviews conducted by Lane Windham focus on FTA Local 10 in Greenville, N.C. Local 22 leaders and organizers were heavily involved in the organization of Local 10.

These interviews were used in the following works:

Griffin, Larry J. and Robert Korstad, "Class as Race and Gender: Making and Breaking a Labor Union in the Jim Crow South,"  Social Science History 19 (Winter 1995): 425-454.

Korstad, Robert, Daybreak of Freedom: Tobacco Workers and the CIO, Winston-Salem, NC 1943-1950, (Ph.D. dissertation, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1987).

Korstad, Robert and Nelson Lichtenstein, "Opportunities Found and Lost: Labor, Radicals, and the Early Civil Rights Movement,"  Journal of American History 75 (December 1988): 786-811.

Korstad, Robert Rodgers, Civil Rights Unionism: Tobacco Workers and the Struggle for Democracy in the Mid-Twentieth-Century South (Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2003).

Windham, Lane, "Greenhands: A History of Local 10 of the Food, Tobacco, Agricultural and Allied Workers of America in Greenville, NC 1946," (honors thesis, Duke University, 1991).

Interviews

Labor: Civil Rights Unionism #04007, Subseries: "E.5. Labor: Civil Rights Unionism." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse E.6. Labor: Michael Honey Collection on Southern Labor History.

37 items.

Interviews conducted by University of Washington at Tacoma professor and author Michael K. Honey between 1981 and 1998 as part of his research on southern labor and civil rights. This project focuses on the close relationship between labor organizing and the civil rights movement in Memphis, Tenn., and elsewhere in the South from the 1930s through the 1970s and 1980s. Many interviewees, black and white, were workers, organizers, and rank and file union members at the Firestone Tire and Rubber Plant in Memphis, Tenn.; others, especially Myles Horton (E-0177) had close ties to the Highlander Folk School in Monteagle, Tenn. Among other interviewees are life-long social justice and labor activists such as Hosea Hudson (E-0178). Topics include race relations at the Firestone plant before and after integration, red-baiting and other challenges unique to organizing in the South, women's experiences in industrial work and labor organizing, and occupational hazards at the Firestone plant.

These interviews were used in the following works:

Honey, Michael, Southern Labor and Black Civil Rights: Organizing Memphis Workers, (Champaign: The University of Illinois Press, 1993).

Honey, Michael, Black Workers Remember: An Oral History of Segregation, Unionism, and the Freedom Struggle, (Berkeley and Los Angeles: The University of California Press, 2002).

Honey, Michael, Going Down Jericho Road: The Memphis strike, Martin Luther King's Last Campaign, (New York: W.W. Norton and Company, 2007)

Some interviews include Mike Honey's notes and partial transcripts. The quality of these documents may be poor because of file conversion from older word processing formats.

Interviews

Labor: Michael Honey Collection on Southern Labor History #04007, Subseries: "E.6. Labor: Michael Honey Collection on Southern Labor History." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse F. Fellowship of Southern Churchmen, 1983-1985.

45 items.

Interviews with members of the Fellowship of Southern Churchmen (FSC) were mostly conducted from 1983 to 1985. The FSC was originally called the Younger Churchmen of the South, and first met in May 1934 at Monteagle, Tenn. As an interracial and interdenominational Christian organization, it worked closely with such groups as the NAACP and the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith for the improvement of social conditions in the rural South. The interviewer was Dallas A. Blanchard, who received funding for the project from the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion. Interviews deal with the interviewees' participation in the FSC and with their previous and subsequent activities.

Related manuscript collections in the Southern Historical Collection:

  • Fellowship of Southern Churchmen Papers (03479
  • Howard A. Kester Papers (03834)

For more information, see the Fellowship of Southern Churchmen Papers (#3479), and the Howard A. Kester Papers (#3834) at the Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Interviews

Fellowship of Southern Churchmen, 1983-1985 #04007, Series: "F. Fellowship of Southern Churchmen, 1983-1985." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse G. Southern Women.

271 items.

Interviews in this series focus on women's participation in movements for social change. The idea for a series of interviews with southern women originated with Jacquelyn Hall's study, Revolt Against Chivalry: Jessie Daniel Ames and the Women's Campaign Against Lynching(Columbia University Press, 1979), which looks at the role of women in the anti-lynching movement of the Depression decade. Other interviews, financed by a 1974 Rockefeller Foundation grant to the Southern Oral History Program, expanded this focus to include labor relations, race relations, and reform movements.

Many of the earlier interviews in this series deal with the experience of southern women in the critical period between the women's suffrage movement of the 1920s and the feminist movement of the 1960s. The individuals interviewed were active participants in many reform movements during this period. The interviews particularly explore the interaction between the women's private lives and their public activities.

Many of the women interviewed were born between 1890 and 1910. Thus, they matured politically during the 1930s, the era of the Great Depression, labor organization, and New Deal reform. They are from various social classes and are of different races. Many of the women can be grouped into three categories: women involved in labor and workers' education movements either as students or as teachers; black and white women active in the civil rights movement; and women who, in addition to their contributions to these reform movements, also pursued professional careers. A great number of them were affiliated with the Commission on Interracial Cooperation, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the Southern Conference for Human Welfare, the Women's Division of the Southern Methodist Church, the Young Women's Christian Association, or the Southern Summer School for Women Workers.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse G.1. Southern Women: Individual Biographies.

92 items.

Interviews focusing on women's participation in movements for social change. Many deal with southern women active in reform movements between the 1910s women's suffrage movement and the 1960s feminist movement. These interviews explore the interaction between the private lives and public activities of women representing various social classes and races. Interviewees include women who were involved in labor and workers' education movements; black and white women active in the civil rights movement; and women who, in addition to their contributions to these reform movements, also pursued professional careers. Many were affiliated with the Commission on Interracial Cooperation, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the Southern Conference for Human Welfare, the Women's Division of the Southern Methodist Church, the Young Women's Christian Association, or the Southern Summer School for Women Workers.

Interviews

Southern Women: Individual Biographies #04007, Subseries: "G.1. Southern Women: Individual Biographies." Interviews

Film F-4007/1

Mabel Pollitzer #04007, Subseries: "G.1. Southern Women: Individual Biographies." F-4007/1

Image P-4007/G1

Mabel Pollitzer #04007, Subseries: "G.1. Southern Women: Individual Biographies." P-4007/G1

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse G.2. Southern Women: Interviews with a Special Focus.

179 items.

Included in this series are interviews with women who attended medical school during the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s. Interviewees discuss medical training, perceptions of themselves as minority students and professionals, and patients' and male colleagues' perceptions of and reactions to women physicians. Also included are interviews that relate to black and white women involved in the civil rights movement in Atlanta, Ga., between the 1940s and 1990s. Interviews for a project on North Carolina women's leadership and grassroots activism explore the experiences of notable women leaders. The project seeks to redefine leadership to encompass women's efforts in grassroots movements, especially in environmental movements, community development, and self-help organizations. Included are five interviews conducted in the late 1990s by Holloway Sparks with three lesbian activists living and working in North Carolina. Twenty-five interviews conducted by Alicia Rouverol are with Native American women leaders and leaders of grassroots organizations. Interviews conducted by Barbara Allen are with women who grew up on tenant farms and worked during the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s at the Jerold Plant in Smithfield, Johnston County, N.C. An interview with Kay Yow, women's basketball coach at North Carolina State University is also included.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse G.2.1. Southern Women: Interviews with a Special Focus: American Women in Medicine Project.

8 items.

Seven interviews with women who attended medical school in the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s. The interviewees completed training in psychiatry, pediatrics, obstetrics, gynecology, orthopedic surgery, public health, and general practice. These interviews explore numerous topics including feelings about undertaking medical studies, perceptions of themselves as minority students and professionals, and patients' and male colleagues' perceptions of and reactions to women physicians. The American Women in Medicine interviews were conducted by Sara Fowler for a 1974 independent study project under the direction of Jacquelyn Hall.

Interviews

Southern Women: Interviews with a Special Focus: American Women in Medicine Project #04007, Subseries: "G.2.1. Southern Women: Interviews with a Special Focus: American Women in Medicine Project." Interviews

Folder G66a

Research paper by interviewer Sara Fowler #04007, Subseries: "G.2.1. Southern Women: Interviews with a Special Focus: American Women in Medicine Project." Folder G66a

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse G.2.2. Southern Women: Interviews with a Special Focus: Black and White Women in Atlanta Public Life Project.

7 items.

Seven interviews conducted by Kathryn L. Nasstrom for her dissertation, "Women, the Civil Rights Movement, and the Politics of Historical Memory in Atlanta, 1946-1973" (UNC Chapel Hill, 1993) The six African American women and one white woman interviewed were involved in various phases of the civil rights movement in Atlanta, Ga. Interviewees discuss their civic and political work and Atlanta's social and political climate during the mid twentieth century.

All quotations must be taken from transcripts.

Interviews

Southern Women: Interviews with a Special Focus: Black and White Women in Atlanta Public Life #04007, Subseries: "G.2.2. Southern Women: Interviews with a Special Focus: Black and White Women in Atlanta Public Life Project." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse G.2.3. Southern Women: Interviews with a Special Focus: Women's Leadership and Grassroots Activism Project.

162 items.

Begun in 1994, this project is one of six projects aimed at understanding how North Carolinians have dealt with the changes that have transformed the state since the Great Depression (other projects focus on University history; North Carolina politics; business history; broadcast media; and memory and community studies). These projects were launched with a gift from Walter Royal Davis that enabled the Southern Oral History Program and the Academic Affairs Library to establish the Davis Oral History Fund.

Interviews explore the experiences of notable women leaders. The project seeks to redefine leadership to encompass women's efforts in grassroots movements and organization, especially in environmental movements, community development, and self-help organizations.

Included are five interviews conducted in the late 1990s by Holloway Sparks with three lesbian activists living and working in North Carolina. Sparks, a doctoral student in the Department of Political Science at UNC Chapel Hill studied the dissident practices of activist women and the role of political courage in enabling activism and dissent.

Twenty-five interviews conducted by Alicia Rouverol are with Native American women leaders and leaders of grassroots organizations. Interviews conducted by Barbara Allen are with women who grew up on tenant farms and worked during the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s at the Jerold Plant in Smithfield, Johnston County, N.C. An interview with Kay Yow, women's basketball coach at North Carolina State University is also included.

An interview by Pamela Grundy with Kay Yow, women's basketball coach at North Carolina State University is also included.

Many of the other interviews were conducted as a class assignment by undergraduate students in a class called Women in American History, which was taught by Jacquelyn Hall at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the fall of 1994. Others were done by class members in an oral history class at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the spring of 1995.

Interviews

Southern Women: Interviews with a Special Focus: Women's Leadership and Grassroots Activism Project #04007, Subseries: "G.2.3. Southern Women: Interviews with a Special Focus: Women's Leadership and Grassroots Activism Project." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse G.2.4. Southern Women: Interviews with a Special Focus: Women Workers at the Jerold Plant, Smithfield, N.C.

2 items.

Two interviews relating to women who worked at the Jerold Plant, a sewing plant set up in 1954 in Smithfield, N.C., by the Jerold Corporation. The plant produced high quality garments. Interviewees recount their experiences growing up in tenant farming families in Johnston County, N.C., and working as sewers and supervisors in the Jerold Plant from the 1950s until it closed in the early 1980s. The interviews were conducted by Barbara Allen.

Interviews

Southern Women: Interviews with a Special Focus: Women Workers at the Jerold Plant, Smithfield, N.C. #04007, Subseries: "G.2.4. Southern Women: Interviews with a Special Focus: Women Workers at the Jerold Plant, Smithfield, N.C." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse G.3. Southern Women: Hope and Dignity: Older Black Women of the South.

28 items.

Interviews, conducted between 1979 and 1981 by Emily Herring Wilson, for her book Hope and Dignity: Older Black Women of the South. Overall, Wilson interviewed more than forty older black women in North Carolina and selected twenty-seven for inclusion in the publication. The interviewees include gospel singers, midwives, teachers, ministers, college professors, civil rights organizers, artists, and musicians.

Interviews

Southern Women: Hope and Dignity: Older Black Women of the South #04007, Subseries: "G.3. Southern Women: Hope and Dignity: Older Black Women of the South." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse H. Piedmont Industrialization, 1974-1980.

328 items.

Interviews for Perspectives on Industrialization: The Piedmont Crescent of Industry, 1900-1940 project funded primarily by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). The project focuses on the impact of industrialization in seven main areas: Badin, Burlington, Bynum, Catawba County, Charlotte, and Durham, N.C., and Greenville, S.C. Other interviews are with individuals from Carrboro, Greensboro, Gastonia, and Marion, N.C., and several interviews pertain to the textile workers' strike in Elizabethton, Tenn., in 1929.

Topics include the development of various industries in these regions, especially textiles, tobacco, hosiery, and furniture and the experiences of workers in these industries and in various facets of their daily life, including health, recreation, religion, family, education, and financial hardships.

Transcripts are available for most of the interviews, and some interviewers provided narrative indices, biographical information sheets on interviewees, clippings, and photographs.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse H. Supplementary Materials

100 items.

Supplementary materials include background information, working papers on each locality studied, a paper on industrialization in the Piedmont, a grant report written for NEH, and curriculum vitae for the primary interviewers. The bulk of this material consists of copyrighted reports on each locality studied. These reports provide historical information about each community, and synthesize the contents of the interviews. An introductory essay gives an overview of industrialization in the Piedmont. Also included is an article about the program and curriculum vitae for the project interviewers.

Folder H-1

Report to the National Endowment for the Humanities and newsletter article #04007, Subseries: "H. Supplementary Materials" Folder H-1

Folder H-2

Interviewers' curriculum vitae #04007, Subseries: "H. Supplementary Materials" Folder H-2

Folder H-3

"Industrialization in the Piedmont: An Introduction" by Bob Korstad #04007, Subseries: "H. Supplementary Materials" Folder H-3

Folder H-4

"Badin" by Rosemarie Hester #04007, Subseries: "H. Supplementary Materials" Folder H-4

Folder H-5

"Burlington" by Mary Murphy #04007, Subseries: "H. Supplementary Materials" Folder H-5

Folder H-6

"Bynum" by Douglas DeNatale #04007, Subseries: "H. Supplementary Materials" Folder H-6

Folder H-7

"Catawba County" by Jacquelyn Hall and Patty Dilley #04007, Subseries: "H. Supplementary Materials" Folder H-7

Folder H-8

"Charlotte" by Allen Tullos #04007, Subseries: "H. Supplementary Materials" Folder H-8

Folder H-9

"Durham" by Cliff Kuhn #04007, Subseries: "H. Supplementary Materials" Folder H-9

Folder H-10

"Greenville, South Carolina" by Allen Tullos #04007, Subseries: "H. Supplementary Materials" Folder H-10

Folder H-11

Annotated bibliography by Bob Korstad #04007, Subseries: "H. Supplementary Materials" Folder H-11

Folder H-12

"Oral History in a Southern Mill Village" [Bynum] by Jacquelyn Hall #04007, Subseries: "H. Supplementary Materials" Folder H-12

Folder H-13

Bynum research files #04007, Subseries: "H. Supplementary Materials" Folder H-13

Folder H-14

Bynum research files #04007, Subseries: "H. Supplementary Materials" Folder H-14

Folder H-15

"The Elizabethton, Tennessee, Strike of 1929" by Jacquelyn Hall and Sara Evans #04007, Subseries: "H. Supplementary Materials" Folder H-15

Folder H-16

"Women, Kin, and Collective Action" [Elizabethton] by Jacquelyn Hall #04007, Subseries: "H. Supplementary Materials" Folder H-16

Folder H-17

"Cramerton, North Carolina" by Woody Connette, Tom Hatley, Roger Manley #04007, Subseries: "H. Supplementary Materials" Folder H-17

Folder H-18

Franklinville, N.C. #04007, Subseries: "H. Supplementary Materials" Folder H-18

Folder H-19

Cotton manufacturing, eastern North Carolina #04007, Subseries: "H. Supplementary Materials" Folder H-19

Folder H-20

"Cotton from Raw Materal to Finished Product" by the Cotton-Textile Institute, Inc. #04007, Subseries: "H. Supplementary Materials" Folder H-20

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse H.1. Piedmont Industrialization: Badin, N.C.

8 items.

The interviews for this region document the transformation of a rural area into a company town, Badin, N.C., which was dominated by the Aluminum Company of America (ALCOA). The transformation began with the construction of a dam across the Yadkin River by the Whitney Reduction Company, founded by George Whitney of Whitney and Stephenson, a Pittsburgh brokerage house. After Whitney went bankrupt in 1907, a French company, L'Aluminum Francaise, continued construction of the dam and built an aluminum plant. In 1914, the company sold its holdings to Andrew Mellon, who formed the Tallassee Power Company, a subsidiary of ALCOA. Originally a sparsely settled area, the influx of convict construction crews and black and Italian laborers had a major impact on the social and economic structure of the community.

The people interviewed discussed these changes and the effects on their lives. Several of the interviewees recalled the original rural character of the area and the construction of the dam, aluminum plant, and the company town of Badin. Union activity is also an important topic of discussion in these interviews. The vote for affiliation with the Aluminum Workers of America in 1940 was especially significant because it was the first time in the South that a union won certification in a company-owned town. Race relations are another issue explored. Discrimination at work and in the town, living conditions, and union participation are all topics of discussion.

The Badin interviews were conducted in 1979 by Southern Oral History Program staff member Rosemarie Hester under the sponsorship of the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources. The project culminated in the production of a video documentary, Aluminum Town. Although the study of Badin was not originally part of the Piedmont industrialization project, these interviews were included in the series because Badin's development contrasted with industrialization in some of the other regions selected for research.

Interviews

Piedmont Industrialization: Badin, N.C. #04007, Subseries: "H.1. Piedmont Industrialization: Badin, N.C." Interviews

Image P-4007/H1

Allen, Cary J., Jr., Cary Allen, second from right, at the first annual convention of the North Carolina State AFL-CIO, Charlotte, N.C., March 1958 #04007, Subseries: "H.1. Piedmont Industrialization: Badin, N.C." P-4007/H1

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse H.2. Piedmont Industrialization: Burlington, N.C.

51 items.

Burlington, N.C., is of particular significance for industrialization in the Piedmont because it was one of the first places where the textile industry took hold, and it eventually became the center for Burlington Industries, the largest textile corporation in the world. At first called Company Shops, Burlington originated in the 1850s as the location of the repair shops of the Goldsboro-Charlotte line of the North Carolina Railroad. The name was changed to Burlington in 1887. The first cotton mill in Alamance County, the Alamance Cotton Mill, was built on Cane Creek in 1837 by Edwin Michael Holt and William Carrigan. The mill survived the Civil War, and Holt and his sons gradually added other cotton mills to their holdings. By 1900, the Holt family controlled 24 of the 29 mills in Alamance County. Several mills were located in Burlington, and the city limits later expanded to include other mills and the villages surrounding them.

After World War I, the cotton industry in Burlington experienced economic difficulties, partly due to a fall in demand for the ginghams that constituted the area's main product. In 1923, at the invitation of the Burlington Chamber of Commerce, James Spencer Love, who owned a controlling interest in the Gastonia Cotton Manufacturing Company of Gastonia, N.C., founded Burlington Industries. Initially, Love's company manufactured cotton cloth, but it was affected by the general slump in the cotton industry. Within a year, Love had switched to rayon manufacturing. During the 1920s and even during the Depression, Burlington Industries expanded, building new mills and taking over old ones. By the end of 1936, Burlington Industries owned 29 mills.

In order to explore the history of the textile industry in Burlington, efforts were focused on former workers of the E. M. Holt Plaid Mill, owned by the Holt family, and on the Pioneer plant, owned by Burlington Industries. Established in 1883, the Plaid Mill was one of two cotton mills in Company Shops before the town was renamed. The mill was established by Lawrence Holt with financial backing from Banks Holt, W. H. Turrentine, and William A. Erwin. Burlington Industries acquired Plaid Mill in 1938. The Pioneer plant, the first mill owned by Burlington Industries, was built in 1923; the Piedmont Heights mill village grew up around it. In the 1920s and 1930s, the Burlington textile industry diversified into hosiery as well as rayon manufacture. As a result, the interviewers also talked with former workers from the Burlington area's many hosiery mills.

Work, family, and living conditions are the topics covered most extensively in these interviews. Although the interviewers focused primarily on the Plaid and Pioneer mills, the interviews deal with the geographic and job mobility that characterized these people's lives. Movement--from farm to factory, from job to job, and from village to village--is an important feature of most of these interviews. Consequently, many Piedmont mill towns are discussed, among them Swepsonville, Leaksville, Spray, Schoolfield, Glen Raven, Glencoe, Altamahaw, Gibsonville, Durham, Bellemont, and Graham. Many of the interviewees worked part or all of their lives in Burlington's hosiery mills. Several of them engaged in home production of stockings, an important feature of the hosiery industry in the 1920s and 1930s. Ethel Hilliard discussed at length her childhood in El Dorado, a North Carolina gold mining town.

One of the main themes pursued by the interviewers was the transition from family ownership (the Holt mills) to corporate management (Burlington Industries). The relationship between workers and owners is reflected in vignettes about members of the Holt family and of J. Spencer Love, and in accounts of union activity. Technology, time study, work organization, the impact of the Depression and World War II on the textile industry, occupational sex roles, child labor, and working conditions, are all topics of discussion.

These interviews are also important for the information they include about everyday life. Most of the interviewees discuss family history, childhood, and education. Other topics include housing, sanitation, the advent of electricity, transportation, and diet. Some of the interviews reveal how some farm practices, such as gardening, raising livestock, and canning, were continued in the mill villages. The interview with Ben Wiles, a grocer, is informative both about the grocery business before the age of supermarkets, and about the implements of everyday living. Boarding was an important feature of mill village life, and more than half of these interviewees either boarded at some stage in their lives or had parents who ran boarding houses.

Health was an important topic of discussion in almost every interview. Common illnesses, the effect of cotton dust in the mills, childbearing, the flu epidemic of 1918 , and health care (doctors, midwives, and folk remedies) are all discussed. Interviews with Carroll Lupton , a doctor who had worked in Piedmont Heights, and with Grace Moore Maynard and Mrs. Robinson former members of the Burlington Service League are particularly informative on the subject of health.

Recreation is another aspect of everyday life discussed in these interviews. Many of the interviewees talked about dances, drinking customs, and entertainments such as the circus, medicine shows, and movies. Music--string bands, labor and folk songs, fiddling, and gospel--was also an important part of these workers' lives. Among sports activities, baseball stands out. Several workers including H. G. Meacham, V. Baxter Splawn, and Frank Webster played in baseball leagues and a few belonged to semi-pro teams .

Religion is also covered. In some cases, the interviewers were especially interested in exploring the relationship between the churches and the mill owners. Other interviews reveal the importance of preacher George Washington Swinney and Glen Hope Baptist Church to Piedmont Heights mill village. Preacher Swinney was no longer alive at the time that these interviews were conducted, but an interview with his wife, Etta Swinney and tapes of his preaching are included. Interviews with Mildred Overman, educational director of Glen Hope Church, and Thomas Staley, a church maintenance worker, are of particular interest.

Interviews with mill managers, other entrepreneurs, and middle-class women, add another dimension to this study of Burlington. Of particular significance are interviews with female entrepreneurs Bertha Cates, a coal and lumber yard operator, and her sister Verna Cates Stackhouse, manager of the King Cotton Mill. Cates was an active member of the Association of Business and Professional Women. One of the first female bank clerks in the area, Grace Moore Maynard, described the impact of World War I on the employment of women in white collar jobs.

A number of other topics are touched upon more briefly. Reid Maynard discussed life at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill during World War II and his wartime service. The interview with Grace Moore Maynard, daughter of D. M. Moore, mayor of Burlington from 1912 to 1919, provides some information about that period of the city's history. Finally, these interviews provide some insights into the mill workers' racial attitudes, but this topic is not explored extensively.

Interviews

Piedmont Industrialization: Burlington, N.C. #04007, Subseries: "H.2. Piedmont Industrialization: Burlington, N.C." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse H.3. Piedmont Industrialization: Bynum, N.C.

49 items.

The Bynum, N.C., interviews focus on a company-owned cotton mill town in Chatham County, N.C.

Bynum had its beginnings as the site of a grist mill located on the Bynum family property. In 1872, Luther and Carney Bynum and neighbors George Thompson and E. W. Atwater established a cotton spinning mill, the Bynum Manufacturing Company. In addition, they created a mill village to house the workers, which included a church, a parsonage, and a company store. In 1886, John Milton Odell of Concord, N.C., acquired majority shares in the Bynum Manufacturing Company, which was dissolved when it became part of the J. M. Odell Manufacturing Company. The Bynums continued to serve as mill superintendents until 1902 when William Lord London of Pittsboro became secretary of the mill. London came from a distinguished North Carolina family. His grandfather had been secretary to Governor William Tryon. After the Revolution, London settled in Wilmington. His son, Henry Adolphus London, moved to Pittsboro before 1838, established a mercantile business, and served as secretary-treasurer of the Cape Fear and Deep River Navigation Company. Henry London's sons were also active entrepreneurs. Henry Armand London edited the Chatham Record for 40 years and was president of the state senate in 1901 and 1903. With his brother, William Lord London, he founded the first bank of Pittsboro. After returning from the Civil War, William Lord London took over his father's mercantile business. In addition to his banking venture, London served on the board of directors of the Pittsboro Railroad Company and the Elizabeth Hosiery Company. He also arranged for the construction of the Pittsboro court house.

In his capacity as secretary of the mill, William Lord London appointed Edgar Moore superintendent in 1904. Except for a break from 1922 to 1927, Moore was superintendent until 1955. By the time William Lord London died in 1916, the Londons had acquired a controlling share in the company. 1916 was also the year that a fire destroyed the mill. Upon reopening the plant in 1917, the company expanded production by adding a second shift and built new houses to accommodate a larger work force.

Arthur London succeeded his father as superintendent and, in 1955, became chairman of the board of the J. M. Odell Manufacturing Company. He was succeeded by his son, W. L. London, and, in 1964, by John London. 1955 also was the year that Frank Durham succeeded Edgar Moore as mill superintendent. As early as the 1950s and 1960s, many long-time workers had begun to leave the mill. More workers left in the 1970s after the mill began to manufacture a synthetic blend and hired the Tuscarora Company of Mount Pleasant, N.C., to manage mill operations. In 1977, Chatham County, with assistance from the Agency for Housing and Urban Development, purchased the mill houses, renovated them, and sold them to the inhabitants and other buyers. John London retired in 1979, ending the London family's association with the mill.

Most of the Bynum interviewees worked at J. M. Odell Manufacturing Company for part or all of their careers. Many of them began to work at Odell after the 1916 fire. Most of the Bynum mill workers moved around less frequently than their Burlington counterparts and maintained close ties with the rural community after migrating to Bynum from surrounding farms. In fact, some of the interviewees spent part of their working lives as farmers or farm laborers. Because the J. M. Odell Manufacturing Company in Bynum was a spinning mill, the subseries covers only this branch of the textile industry. Among the topics covered are technology, the impact of the Depression and World War II on the mill, paternalism, work discipline, work division by sex and race, and unionization attempts. Many of the workers also discussed at length brown lung and other health hazards of mill work. Many of the workers knew the Londons and shared their recollections with the interviewers. Interviews with John and Lawrence London provide more detailed information about the London family and the mill's history.

The interviews also document mill village life in great detail. Interviewer Douglas DeNatale conducted many of the interviews, and the series strongly reflects his interest in rural culture and how it survived and changed in the mill village. Gardens, livestock maintained within the village, diet, homes, and furnishings comprise some of the elements of everyday living covered by the interviewees. Many of the workers also talked about early modes of transportation and the advent of the automobile. The transition from company to private ownership in the 1970s had a major impact on the community, and many of the interviewers discussed this change. Good information about this change can be found in the interview with Greg Warren of the Chatham County Housing Authority.

Family ties and relationships are also discussed in these interviews. Childhood, early work experiences, and education are covered in almost every interview. In addition, the interviewees described domestic activities, courting, family violence, and household servants. Most of the interviewees boarded when they first arrived in Bynum, but they tended to lodge with relatives rather than in organized boarding houses. DeNatale was particularly interested in music, religious practices and traditions, and folklore, and, as a result, his interviews explore these topics in detail. Story-telling was a popular pastime in Bynum, and some of the interviewees recounted popular tales. Bynum's musical traditions included gospel singing, Hawaiian music, string bands, and fiddling. Other common pastimes described in the interviews are baseball games, listening to the radio, socials, dances, card playing, movies, hunting and fishing, community fish fries and barbecues, and quilting. Almost every interviewee mentioned religion, and many recalled attending revivals. DeNatale's interest in folkways extended to medical and health matters, and some of his interviews include information about home remedies and folk beliefs. In addition, the interviewees discussed epidemics, especially the 1918 flu epidemic; alcoholism; and health care, including the roles of doctors and midwives.

Other topics are covered in less detail. Some of the interviewees left mill work to take jobs at North Carolina Memorial Hospital in Chapel Hill. Race relations are also covered in discussions of African Americans entering mill work, servants, the Ku Klux Klan, and school desegregation in Pittsboro. A few of the interviewees mentioned Bynum citizens serving in World War I.

The Bynum interviews include the first interviews conducted for the Perspectives on Industrialization Project by an oral history class at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The class was designed to train field workers to conduct subsequent interviews for the project. As a result, the interviews in this subseries vary in quality. After the class ended, one student, Douglas DeNatale, conducted further interviews in Bynum for his master's thesis in the folklore curriculum at UNC Chapel Hill.

Interviews

Piedmont Industrialization: Bynum, N.C. #04007, Subseries: "H.3. Piedmont Industrialization: Bynum, N.C." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse H.4. Piedmont Industrialization: Catawba, N.C.

51 items.

The Catawba, N.C., interviews focus on the industrialization of an entire county.

Cotton manufacturing began in Catawba County as early as 1816, but substantial industrial development in Catawba came with the railroads. Hickory and Conover, the main industrial centers, were originally stops along the Western North Carolina Railroad line from Salisbury to Morganton. Maiden, a third industrial town, developed around a cotton mill that farmer Henry Carpenter built to take advantage of a rail line through his property. After the turn of the century, Catawba County's nascent industry received a boost when the Southern Power Company (later Duke Power) began to promote industry in order to add customers for the electricity generated by its hydroelectric plants on the Catawba River. In addition to cotton, the manufacturing of hosiery, furniture, and work gloves became main industries in the area. Although the interviews are with workers in all four of Catawba County's major industries, furniture and glove manufacturing were stressed more than hosiery or cotton.

Many of the interviews relate to the Shuford family and the many enterprises they created. In 1880, Abel A. Shuford founded a cotton mill at Granite Falls, which he later moved to Hickory. Shuford also founded Hickory's first bank (the First National Bank of Hickory) and invested in other local enterprises. Subsequent generations diversified into furniture, plastics, rayon, and pressure-sensitive tape. In the early 1980s, Shuford Mills and another Shuford enterprise, Century Furniture, were the largest employers in Hickory.

Another branch of the Shuford family was instrumental in the development of the glove and furniture industries in Conover. Adrian R. Shuford began his career as a clerk in his uncle Abel Shuford's bank in Hickory. In 1916, Shuford and a local Republican politician, Charles Robert Brady, bought the Warlong Glove Company of Newton and moved it to Conover. Brady and Shuford branched into other business ventures, and, by 1925, they held a controlling interest in Hickory Handle. In 1927, they sold the company to Preston Yount and Rob Herman, who were the supervisors at the glove and furniture mills respectively. A year later, Brady and Shuford divided Conover Furniture into two companies, with Brady retaining control of Conover Furniture and Shuford taking charge of Warlong Glove. Under Shuford's management, Conover Knitting Company was established and installed in the same building as Warlong Glove. Conover Furniture passed to Brady's son, Walter Brady, and son-in-law Bill Barker upon his death in 1934. Interviews with members of the Shuford family and with Lula Brady Barker document the history of the Shuford and Brady enterprises in Conover.

During the Depression, the furniture industry hit upon hard times owing to a decline in the market. As a result, Conover Furniture went bankrupt in 1938. James Edgar Broyhill, a Lenoir industrialist, bought the plant in 1941. Information on the development of the glove industry after World War II can be found in the interview with Arthur Little, founder and owner of Southern Glove, and in interviews with Ralph Bowman, former president of Hickory Chair, and Hugh Boyer, president of the company (now called Hickory Manufacturing). These interviews also document the transition from family to corporate management, and the interviewees' ties with the furniture industry as a whole through membership in such organizations as Western Carolina Industries and the Southern Furniture Manufacturers' Association.

Most of the interviewees worked in the furniture, glove, cotton, or hosiery industries although many of them held several different jobs during their careers, some of them outside of industry. Topics relating to work include wages, hours, discipline, pensions, technology, management, and working conditions. Many of the interviewees described occupational, gender, and racial differences in their respective industries. Cotton mill workers discussed stretchouts and speedups most often, while furniture workers mentioned occupational hazards more than other interviewees. Some of the workers, especially those in the glove and hosiery industries, spent part of their careers doing piecework at home. Almost every interviewee voiced an opinion about union activity. Interviewee Mareda Cobb recalled the Gastonia Strike of 1929 and the 1934 General Strike. Most of the interviewees also recalled the Depression, and some of them worked for the WPA during that period. Several of them also recounted the impact of World War II and the 1974 recession on industry.

Other jobs held by various interviewees included railroad work, carpentry, and construction work on dam projects. Jobs for women included domestic service, clerical work, banking, and journalism. A number of the interviewees grew up on farms and did farm work as children. Several of them worked as farmers during their adult careers. A few taught school.

Family life is another theme in these interviews. Most of the interviewees recalled their childhoods, education, and early work experiences. Few of these workers lived in mill villages. Several, however, lived in housing owned by Brady, and one worker spent his childhood in a mill village in Newton. The interviewees in this series were frank in discussing courtship and marriage, pregnancy and childbirth, birth control, illegitimacy, and domestic violence. Boarding and domestic servants are mentioned in a few of the interviews. Mareda Cobb and Carrie Yelton were very active in senior citizens groups and nutrition centers for the elderly.

Religion is also a topic of importance. Many of the interviewees belonged to the Lutheran Church, reflecting the German ancestry of many of the region's settlers. Others were Methodists, Baptists, or attended the United Church of Christ or the Assembly of God. Several of the interviewees talked about the dual system of public and Lutheran parochial schools that prevailed in Catawba County until the 1930s. W. Farel Warlick played an important role in the consolidation of the Conover schools.

Many of the interviewees discussed the political life of the county. They often revealed their political affiliations, took stands on the New Deal, and commented on political events, including the 1974 recession. World War I, World War II, and the Korean War were addressed from the perspective of those who fought. Although most of the interviewees who claimed a political affiliation belonged to the Democratic or Republican parties, two of them discussed the Populist Party. The Fred Yoder interview focused on his father's participation in the Farmers' Alliance and in the Populist and Democratic parties. Marion Butler, Robert Glenn, and Josephus Daniels figure in his account. Local politics are also discussed in an interview with Adrian Shuford, who served as mayor of Conover and in the state senate.

Another area covered in these interviews is race relations. Most discussion on this subject focused on race relations in the work place and on the differing jobs assigned to members of each race. Other topics include integration, the NAACP, white racial attitudes, and the Ku Klux Klan. Three interviews with African-American workers cover some of the same topics and provide information on the black community in Conover. Fred Yoder's discussion of the Populist movement includes information on race relations early in the century.

Medicine and health constitute are other areas explored in these interviews. Hospitals, doctors, midwives, nursing homes, and the Catawba Medical Foundation are among the health care providers discussed. The 1918 flu epidemic, polio, and other specific illnesses were also mentioned.

Transportation, recreation, and music are minor themes, although there are many references to them. Recreational activities included movies, radio, swimming, attending fairs, bowling, softball, cock fighting, and square dances. Marshall Clay recalled his participation in a semi-pro baseball league. Thurman A. Sheets made musical instruments as a hobby. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is the subject of part of the interview with Fred Yoder. Yoder recalled various UNC professors, including Charles Lee Raper, J. G. de Roulhac Hamilton, Frank Porter Graham, and Eugene Branson.

Interviews

Piedmont Industrialization: Catawba, N.C. #04007, Subseries: "H.4. Piedmont Industrialization: Catawba, N.C." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse H.5. Piedmont Industrialization: Charlotte, N.C.

33 items.

Charlotte, N.C., has been a focal point for economic development in the Piedmont region. During the antebellum period, Charlotte was a small market town, with only 3,000 citizens in 1860. In spite of its small size, it became an important trade center. As early as 1825, Charlotte businessmen began urging the state legislature to improve the town's transportation links with other markets by establishing railroad service. Construction on the first railroad began in 1849. Location in the center of a gold-producing region also added to Charlotte's importance. With the discovery of gold in Mecklenburg County in 1799 and the opening of other mines in surrounding counties, Charlotte became a center for shipping gold to the federal mint in Philadelphia. In 1835, the United States government established a branch of the mint in Charlotte. Industrial and commercial development began in the second half of the 19th century, with cotton playing an important role. As cotton prices fell after the Civil War, it became more profitable to manufacture textiles in the South, thereby avoiding the cost of shipping cotton north. Charlotte, however, was slower to develop a textile industry than elsewhere in North Carolina. In 1881, entrepreneurs established the town's first textile manufacturing establishment, the Charlotte Cotton Mill. Other mills followed, with the most rapid expansion occurring between 1889 and 1910.

Charlotte began to expanded even more rapidly after the turn of the century. With the encouragement of businessmen and investors such as Daniel Augustus Tompkins, Charlotte's industry became more diversified, with no one industry predominating. Textile and agricultural machinery, chemicals, cotton seed oil, and peanut food products were among the industries that developed in Charlotte during this period. Real estate development and construction accompanied economic expansion. In 1890, James Latta began to develop Dilworth, a tract of land outside the city limits. The Dilworth project eventually included both residential and industrial neighborhoods. Myers Park, a residential development, was begun shortly after the turn of the century. As Charlotte expanded, the city used North Carolina's annexation law to incorporate outlying neighborhoods and mill villages.

After World War II, distribution rather than manufacturing became central to Charlotte's economy. As conglomerates began to incorporate individual mills, cotton manufacturing became more centralized. Consequently, textile manufacturing moved out of the city to other locations, although Charlotte remained at the geographical center of the region's cotton industry. At the same time, new highways began to displace mill villages and other working-class neighborhoods. The development of superhighways facilitated Charlotte's development as a distribution center. Charlotte eventually claimed to be second only to Chicago as a trucking terminal.

Charlotte's emergence as a financial center began after the Civil War. Numerous banks were founded in the 1870s, and the wave of new financial and commercial institutions continued into the 1920s. By the early 1980s, Charlotte claimed to be the largest financial center in the southeast.

The Charlotte interviews on the mill village neighborhoods of north Charlotte. Most of the interviewees worked all or part of their careers in the cotton or hosiery industries. Among the topics discussed are various jobs in the mills, work conditions, child labor, work discipline, changing technology, speed ups, and efficiency experts. The impact of the Depression and World War II is also discussed. Accounts of unionization attempts and strikes figure prominently in these interviews. A few interviewees recalled specific strikes, among them the Gastonia Strike and the 1934 General Strike. Mildred Gwin Andrews, who served as secretary-manager for the Yarn Spinners' Association and worked as a researcher for the Cotton Textile Institute and the American Textile Machinery Association, provided information about the history of cotton manufacturing in North Carolina and described some of the industry's professional associations.

Mill village and family life constitute the other major themes of these interviews. Discussions of paternalism, living conditions, and company stores reveal the close ties between the mills and the villages. The relationship between textile workers and other Charlotte residents illuminates class relations within the city. Almost all of the interviewees discussed family life, including childhood, education, furnishings and diet, courtship, marriage, and pregnancy. A few interviewees also touched upon more personal matters, such as illegitimacy, divorce, birth control, suicide, and alcoholism. Because the interviewers made some of their contacts through a church hot lunch program for senior citizens, programs for the elderly are an important element in these interviews.

Other themes relating to everyday life include recreation, health care, and religion. The interviewees enjoyed a wide variety of recreational activities, including fishing, hunting, square dancing, quilting bees, and playing in musical groups. Interviewees also mentioned attending movies, minstrel and medicine shows, and listening to the phonograph and radio. Several workers also played on mill baseball teams. Among the topics relating to health care are folk cures, the 1918 flu epidemic, and vaccinations. Midwives attended many women at the births of their children, but hospital deliveries are also mentioned. Religion was an important element in the lives of these interviewees. In their narratives, they emphasized church attendance, Sunday school, and revivals rather than their experiences as members of specific denominations.

Because of Charlotte's importance as a commercial center, a few of the interviewees are from outside the textile industry. The owner of a trucking company, and railway, streetcar, and auto workers are included among the interviewees representing occupations relating to transportation. These interviewees discussed unionization in the trucking and railroad industries, and the streetcar workers recalled the strike of 1918. Several mentioned Cameron Morrison, a Charlotte businessman who served as governor of North Carolina (1920-1928) in connection with transportation.

In order to show Charlotte's economic diversity, the project included interviews with business leaders and executives. Milton Short, a member of the Chamber of Commerce, offered a businessman's perspective on Charlotte's growth and development. Interviews with John Belk, Jean Cole, and with engineers at Duke Power and Westinghouse provide information about some of Charlotte's other major enterprises.

The Charlotte interviews include information on a number of prominent North Carolinians. The role Mildred Gwin Andrews took in the textile industry brought her into contact with Liston Pope, Harriet Herring, Howard Odum, Luther Hodges, and James Spencer Love. In his capacity as a naval officer serving in Georgia, Ralph W. Strickland recalled meeting Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Benjamin V. Martin, son of a Clemson professor, had many recollections of his early years and college education at Clemson University.

Related manuscript collections in the Southern Historical Collection:

  • Daniel Augustus Tompkins Papers (00724)
  • Louis Humbert Asbury Papers (04237)
  • Mildred Gwin Andrews Papers (04436)

Interviews

Piedmont Industrialization: Charlotte, N.C. #04007, Subseries: "H.5. Piedmont Industrialization: Charlotte, N.C." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse H.6. Piedmont Industrialization: Durham, N.C.

57 items.

The Durham, N.C., interviews document the experiences of workers in the city's tobacco, textile, and hosiery industries. Durham began its transformation from a crossroads into a major industrial city with the completion of the railroad line between Raleigh and Greensboro, just prior to the Civil War. After the war, Robert F. Morris, one of the largest farmers in Orange County, moved his tobacco business to Durham. William Blackwell, a Person County merchant, acquired the business in 1869 and, in 1870, he took Julian Shakespeare Carr, son of Chapel Hill's leading merchant, as a partner. Carr assumed full ownership of the plant in 1883. By the mid-1880s, Durham had many other tobacco companies, among them Washington Duke and Sons. The Dukes gradually absorbed Blackwell's and other firms and, by 1890, had established a consolidated cigarette firm, the American Tobacco Company. Anti-trust action in 1911, however, forced the dissolution of the company, which was reorganized as the new American Tobacco Company consisting of the former Duke properties, and Liggett and Meyers, which included Blackwell's former holdings.

The textile and hosiery industries in Durham arose in conjunction with the tobacco industry. These mills provided outlets for surplus capital and made bags and other products needed by the tobacco companies. Among Durham's textile establishments was the Erwin Cotton Manufacturing Company and mill village in West Durham, founded by members of the Duke family. William Erwin, who was related to the Holts of Alamance County and had supervised Plaid Mill, served as superintendent. Eventually, Erwin took on Kemp Plummer Lewis, whose family owned the Rocky Mount Cotton Mills, as an associate. The hosiery industry in Durham had similar origins. In 1884, J. S. Carr and J. M. Odell, established the Durham Cotton Mill in East Durham. By the 1890s, Carr, driven out of tobacco by the Tobacco Trust, devoted most of his energies to hosiery as he consolidated 14 local mills into one company.

Work is one of the most important topics covered in these interviews. Many of the interviewees migrated to Durham from surrounding farms (among them, Stagville, owned by Bennehan Cameron), and many of them alternated between farm or sawmilling jobs and work in the city's factories. Often the interviews include accounts of sharecropping, farm work, lumbering, and sawmilling. Among women, domestic service often was their first job. In talking about work in the tobacco factories, the interviewees focus on work conditions, the steps involved in processing tobacco, the division of labor by gender and by race, labor policies, the advent of labor unions, and strikes. The textile and hosiery workers cover similar topics, as well as speedups and time studies. A number of the interviewees relate their personal recollections of William Erwin and Kemp Plummer Lewis.

Race relations are covered more thoroughly in these interviews than in others in the series because many of the tobacco workers were African Americans. Many of the interviewees discussed segregation in the factories, both in jobs and in the facilities provided for blacks and whites. Other topics relating to race relations include segregation and discrimination in the churches, schools, neighborhoods, mill villages, and especially in the unions. Racial violence, such as lynching and Ku Klux Klan incidents, and miscegenation, are also discussed.

Almost all of the interviewees discussed childhood experiences, work as children, education, family life, courtship and marriage, and living conditions. Many of the interviewees described boarding house life, their homes, sanitation facilities, and life in the mill villages. Education occupies a particularly important place in these interviews because some of them were conducted by Kenneth Kornblau, a Duke undergraduate, for a paper on the Durham schools. These interviews focus on the backgrounds and experiences of teachers and school officials and on the history of Durham's school system.

Music played an important role in the lives of many of the people interviewed. They sang in the tobacco factories, played guitars and other instruments, and formed bands and singing groups to perform gospel music and the blues. Several interviewees shared memories of Gary Davis, a nationally known blues singer from Durham. Two of the interviewees worked as musicians, touring with medicine shows and performing on the radio. Other forms of recreation and entertainment are dances, cornshucking and quilting parties, movies, vaudeville, and sports.

These interviews touch on a variety of other topics. Many of the interviewees discussed illnesses, such as tuberculosis, diphtheria, typhoid, and the flu epidemic of 1918. Medical care, especially the segregated services provided by the tobacco companies, is also covered. Many of the women discussed birth control, pregnancy, childbirth, and abortion. Religion was important in the lives of many of the interviewees, and most of them discussed their church involvement. Crime, street life, and prostitution are also covered in several of the interviews. Finally, most of the interviewees discussed the Depression, and a few of them referred to experiences during World War I and World War II.

Related manuscript collections in the Southern Historical Collection:

  • Julian Shakespeare Carr Papers (00141)
  • Kemp Plummer Lewis Papers (03819)
  • Leonidas Lafayette Polk Papers (03708)
  • Willis James Brogden Papers (04407)
  • Thaddeus S. Ferree Papers (04258)
  • Bennehan Cameron Papers (03623)

Interviews

Piedmont Industrialization: Durham, N.C. #04007, Subseries: "H.6. Piedmont Industrialization: Durham, N.C." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse H.7. Piedmont Industrialization: Greenville, S.C.

27 items.

These interviews focus on the development of the textile industry in Greenville, S.C. Before the Civil War, Greenville served as a county seat, a center for grain milling, and a summer vacationing area for Low Country planters. In the 1880s, entrepreneurs began to build cotton mills and accompanying mill villages along the railroad lines on the outskirts of Greenville. As a result, Greenville developed distinctive neighborhoods that reflected the social tensions within the community. There were the prosperous town, the neighborhoods in which black servants lived, and the mill villages.

The interviews also cover the work experiences and daily lives of Greenville's mill workers. Most of the workers or their families migrated to the city from farms in the Piedmont or the Appalachian Mountains. Many of the interviewees related their farming experiences and described their adjustments to mill work. In describing mill work, the interviewees talked about work conditions, safety, stretchouts, wages, paternalism, the division of labor by gender, home work, the impact of the Depression and World War II, and violence in the mills. They also discussed unionization attempts, and several interviewees had vivid recollections of the 1934 General Strike.

Occupational illness is an especially important topic in these interviews. Many of the interviewees suffered from emphysema, byssinosis, or brown lung as a result of their mill work, and some of them had been involved in litigation with textile companies over health issues. Technology, the construction of mills and mill villages, and the movement of the textile industry from New England to the South are also mentioned.

Interviews also document family life in the mill villages. Almost all of the interviewees discussed their childhoods and school years. Many talked about marriage, courtship, illegitimacy, pregnancy, divorce, sex and birth control, and old age. Discussions of sanitation, attitudes towards the residents of the mill villages, part-time farming, community violence, housing, illnesses and medical care, transportation, and housing reflect the tenor of mill village life. The interviewees belonged to a variety of churches, and some of them discussed company involvement in mill village churches. Although many mentioned recreation and music, this topic is not as important in these interviews as it is in some of the other series.

Other topics include World War I, military service in World War II, the electric power industry, and politics. Although there is one interview with an African American worker and some mention of the role of blacks in the mills, race relations are not a major topic.

Related manuscript collections in the Southern Historical Collection:

  • McBee Family Papers (02263)

Interviews

Piedmont Industrialization: Greenville, S.C. #04007, Subseries: "H.7. Piedmont Industrialization: Greenville, S.C." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse H.8. Piedmont Industrialization: Piedmont, Miscellaneous.

30 items.

Interviews in this group reflect the theme of the "Perspectives on Industrialization: The Piedmont Crescent of Industry, 1900-1940" project, but either were not conducted in any of the original seven communities or were done after the completion of the original project. The project focuses on the impact of industrialization in seven main areas: Badin, Burlington, Bynum, Catawba County, Charlotte, and Durham, N.C., and Greenville, S.C. These interviews are with workers from the communities Carrboro, Greensboro, Gastonia, and Marion, N.C. Topics include the development of various industries in these regions, especially textiles, tobacco, hosiery, and furniture and the experiences of workers in these industries, both in their work and in daily life, including health, recreation, religion, family, education, and financial hardships.

Interviews

Piedmont Industrialization: Piedmont, Miscellaneous #04007, Subseries: "H.8. Piedmont Industrialization: Piedmont, Miscellaneous." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse H.9. Piedmont Industrialization: Farmville, N.C.

16 items.

Interviews about industry in Farmville, N.C., were done by Scott Ellsworth of Duke University in 1977.

Interviews

Piedmont Industrialization: Farmville, N.C. #04007, Subseries: "H.9. Piedmont Industrialization: Farmville, N.C." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse H.10. Piedmont Industrialization: Elizabethton, Tenn.

5 items.

Interviews are chiefly about the strike in 1929 by textile workers in Elizabethton, Tenn.

Interviews

Piedmont Industrialization: Elizabethton, Tenn. #04007, Subseries: "H.10. Piedmont Industrialization: Elizabethton, Tenn." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files.

About 10,000 items.

Research files for Like a Family: The Making of a Southern Cotton Mill World (1987), which draws heavily on the interviews of Series H. Materials include chapter drafts, correspondence, reports, notes, genealogies, research project proposals, scholarly articles, local history materials, newspaper clippings, maps, photographs, and other related material.

Note: Original folder titles and arrangement have been preserved.

Box 1

#04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 1

Badin: General Information #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 1

Badin: Report #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 1

Badin: Videotape Proposal #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 1

Badin: Film History Grant Proposal #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 1

Bibliographies, Book Reviews #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 1

Burlington Industries General Information #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 1

Burlington: Census 1900 #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 1

Box 2

#04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 2

Burlington: Census 1900 #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 2

Burlington: Contacts and Interviewees #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 2

Burlington: Correspondence, Memos, etc. #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 2

Burlington: Historical Documents #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 2

Burlington: Maps and Chamber of Commerce Documents #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 2

Burlington: Unions #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 2

Burlington: Historical Newsclips #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 2

Burlington: Newspapers #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 2

Burlington: Journals, Notes, Miscellaneous #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 2

Burlington: Ethel Shackley Papers #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 2

Burlington: Glen Hope Baptist Church #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 2

Bynum: Cabbagetown Learning Center #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 2

Bynum: Bibliographies, Interviewers, Interviewees #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 2

Box 3

#04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 3

Bynum: Census Baldwin Township #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 3

Bynum: Chatham County Housing Authority Renovation of Mill Village #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 3

Bynum: Chronological Newspaper File #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 3

Bynum: Genealogies #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 3

Bynum: Interview List #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 3

Bynum: Census 1900 Primary Source Report #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 3

Bynum: Primary Source Report #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 3

Bynum: Land Deeds Primary Source Report #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 3

Catawba: Miscellaneous #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 3

Catawba: History of Building/Charlotte Brown, NC State #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 3

Catawba: Miscellaneous Interviews #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 3

Catawba: Notes #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 3

Box 4

#04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 4

Charlotte: Data Sheets #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 4

Greenville: Data Sheets #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 4

Catawba: Notes on Hosiery #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 4

Burlington: Data Sheets #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 4

Catawba: Data Sheets #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 4

Badin: Data Sheets #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 4

Durham: Data Sheets #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 4

Bynum: Data Sheets #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 4

Catawba: Company Publications #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 4

Catawba: Employer Associations #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 4

Catawba: Chamber of Commerce Publications #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 4

Catawba: Company Newsletters #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 4

Catawba: Union Publications #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 4

North Carolina Wage Information #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 4

Catawba: Employment and Wages #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 4

Hickory: Newspaper Clippings #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 4

Catawba: Newsclips #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 4

Catawba: Census #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 4

Box 5

#04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 5

Catawba: 1900 Census #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 5

Catawba: Manufacturers and Organizations #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 5

Conover: Local History #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 5

Hickory #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 5

High Point: Smith #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 5

Long Island #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 5

Maiden #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 5

Maps: Hickory, Conover, Lenoir #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 5

Charlotte: D. A. Tompkins #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 5

Charlotte: Duke Power History #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 5

Box 6

#04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 6

Charlotte: Neighborhoods #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 6

Charlotte: Maps #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 6

Charlotte: Trucking #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 6

Charlotte: Lance #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 6

Charlotte: Grady Cole, WBT #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 6

Charlotte: Unions #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 6

Charlotte #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 6

Charlotte: Mills Info #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 6

Charlotte: Mill Villages #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 6

Mecklenburg: Census Data #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 6

Charlotte: Newsclippings #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 6

Durham #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 6

Box 7

#04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 7

Durham: Miscellaneous #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 7

Durham: Statistics #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 7

Tobacco Information #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 7

Durham: Jim Wise Article #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 7

Duke Power #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 7

Durham: Carr Article #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 7

Durham: Cohn Article #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 7

Durham: Badster Article #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 7

Durham: The Erwin Mill #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 7

Durham: Economic Summary 1977 #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 7

Durham: Buck Duke #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 7

Durham: General Notes and Information #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 7

Box 8

#04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 8

Durham: Tobacco: Jobs and Process #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 8

Greenville: Hollis #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 8

Greenville #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 8

South Carolina Textile Information #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 8

Greenville: Maps #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 8

Piedmont Textile Newsclippings #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 8

Occupational Structure, 1930 #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 8

Maps #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 8

Box 9

#04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 9

Hines Photographs and Information #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 9

Archives: Library of Congress Photographs #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 9

Notes on Photographs: Bettman #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 9

Renwick: Abandoned Textile Machines #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 9

Mill Photographs: Notes #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 9

AFL-CIO Photographs and Notes #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 9

Appalshop Cartoon #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 9

Mill Photographs and Notes: Wayne State Archives #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 9

Mill Photographs and Notes: Duke Manuscript Collection #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 9

Mill Photographs and Notes: California Museum of Photography #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 9

Mill Photographs and Notes: Georgia Textile Workers #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 9

Mill Photographs and Notes: South Caroliniana Library #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 9

Mill Photographs and Notes: State Historical Society of Wisconsin #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 9

Mill Photographs and Notes: National Women's Trade Union League #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 9

Photographs: Burlington and Glencoe #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 9

Photographs: Southern Bulletin #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 9

Cartoons and Advertisements #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 9

Robert Coles #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 9

Box 10

#04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 10

Photographs: Cotton #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 10

Photograph: Glencoe: Ethel and George Faucette #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 10

Photographs: Burlington: Glen Hope Church #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 10

Photographs: Greenville #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 10

Photographs: Labor, Strikes #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 10

Cover Photograph: "Like A Family" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 10

Photographs: Performing "Like A Family" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 10

Photograph: Machinery #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 10

Photographs: Eula McGill #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 10

Photographs: Mills Outside #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 10

Photographs: Mill Houses #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 10

Photographs: Franklinville #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 10

Photographs: Mill Villages #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 10

Photographs: Mill Work #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 10

Photographs: The Story of Cotton: Calloway Mills #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 10

String Band Photography #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 10

Photographs: Marion: Vesta and Sam Finley #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 10

Photographs and Notes: White Oak Cotton Mills #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 10

Photographs: Women #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 10

Photographs: Burlington #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 10

Photographs: Miscellaneous and Ordering Correspondence #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 10

Photographs and Notes #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 10

Photographs: "Like A Family" Chapter Three #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 10

Photographs: "Like A Family" Chapter Four #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 10

Photographs: "Like A Family" Chapter Five #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 10

Photographs: "Like A Family" Chapter Six #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 10

Photographs and Notes: Miscellaneous #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 10

Box 11

#04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 11

Publications: South and Regionalism #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 11

Textiles: Newsclippings #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 11

Textiles and Labor: Newsclippings and Publications #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 11

Textiles: Newsclippings #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 11

Textile Workers: Newsclippings #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 11

Women's Employment: Census Data #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 11

General Strike, 1934 #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 11

Gastonia: Strike, 1929 #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 11

New York Times articles: Strike, 1929 #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 11

Marion: Strike, 1929 #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 11

Box 12

#04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 12

Broadus Mitchell #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 12

Box 13

#04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 13

NEH Interim Report, January 1979 #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 13

NEH Grant: Extension Request, 1980 #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 13

NEH Grant: Request for Additional Funds #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 13

NEH Grant: Correspondence #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 13

Advisory Committee/ Industrialization Project #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 13

NEH Proposal, Addendum #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 13

NEH Proposal #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 13

Index #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 13

Narrative Report #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 13

Copies of Correct Cover Sheets #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 13

Social History Proposal 1 #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 13

Plan of Work #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 13

Summer Project 1977: Notes on Sessions #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 13

Potential Interviews #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 13

Social History Proposal: Addenda, Notes #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 13

Social History Project, Summer 1977 #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 13

Social History: Memos, Drafts #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 13

Box 14

#04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

Budget #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

Paper on Lowell, Mass., and Philadelphia, Pa., Textile Industry #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

Job Applicants: Project Coordinator for Industrial Project #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

Social History Proposal: Miscellaneous #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

Phillip Scranton, "Varieties of Paternalism..." #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

H. F. Sherwood, "Our New Racial Drama" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

Skocpol, "Political Response to Capitalist Crisis" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

Elliott Smith, "Lessons of the Stretchout" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

Smith and Nyman, "Technology and Labor" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

Judith E. Smith, "Our Own Kind: Family and Kin Networks" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

South Carolina: Journal of the House: Investigation, 1930 #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

Southern Exposure: Articles on Textiles #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

Southern Textile Bulletin #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

Southern Textile Workers: The Struggle for Survival #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

Southern Workers: Northern Bosses #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

Spencer Shops and Daniel Ellison Project #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

Charles Stephenson, "Mobility of 19th Century Working Class" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

Boris Stern, "Mechanical Change in the Textile-Cotton Industry, 1910-1936" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

"The Meaning of the Textile Strike" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

W. H. Swift, "The Campaign in North Carolina" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

Bobo Tanner and Rutherford County #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

K. S. Tanner Newsclip #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

Taylorsville: Frank Matheson Interview #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

"A Day on Factory Hill,"  Southern Voices #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

"Eager Hands: Labor for Southern Textiles, 1850-1860" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

Textile Industry #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

"New Men,"  Textile Leaders of the South #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

Textile Reviews #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

The Textile Worker #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

Textiles: Articles #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 14

Box 15

#04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

Textiles: Unions: Newspaper Clippings #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

E. P. Thompson #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

Thompson, "Cotton Field to Cotton Mill" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

Holland Thompson, "From the Cotton Field to Factory" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

Holland Thompson, "Life in A Southern Mill Town" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

Thompson, "Southern Textile Situation" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

George Tindall, Emergence of the New South #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

Tobacco Leaf Houses #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

Tournquist, "Organizing Labor in North Carolina,"  New South , 1970 #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

Barbara Tucker, "The Family and Industrial Discipline in Ante-Bellum New England" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

United States Department of Labor: Women's Bureau, "Causes of Absence for Men and for Women in Four Cotton Mills," 1929 #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

United States Department of Labor: Women's Bureau: Ethel Best, "Conditions of Work in Spin Rooms," 1929 #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

United States Department of Labor: Women's Bureau: Ethel Best, "Hours, Earnings, and Employment in Cotton Mills," 1933 #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

United States Department of Labor: Women's Bureau: "Women in South Carolina Industries" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

United States Textile Industry #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

T. W. Uttley, "Cotton Spinning and Manufacturing in the USA" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

Rupert Vance, "All These People" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

Rupert Vance, "Piedmont Crescent" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

Van Osdell, "Cotton Mills, Labor, and the Southern Mind" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

Gastonia: Mary Heaton Vorse Papers #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

Wages #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

Anthony F. C. Wallace, "Rockdale" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

Wallace and Beckles, "1966 Employment Survey in the Textile Industry of the Carolinas" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

Lee Waters #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

Reverend C. E. Weltner, "Social Welfare and Child Labor in S.C. Cotton Mill Communities" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

David Whisnant, "Appalachia" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

O. de Bouveignes, "De Grandpre, a la Cote d'Andola, en 1786-1787" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

Jonathan Wiener, "Planter Persistence and Social Change: Alabama, 1850-1970" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

Raymond Williams, "Base and Superstructure" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

Joel Williamson, "The Crucible of Race" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

Women's Bureau Pamphlets #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

Women: Southern Industry General #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

Danville: Helen Murray, "The Praying Strike" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

James Allen Woolard, "The 1958 Strike at the Harriet and Henderson Mills, Henderson, N.C.," 1983 #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

Working Conditions of the Textile Industry: Senate Hearings, 1929 #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

Gavin Wright, "Cheap Labor and Southern Textiles Before 1880" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

Gavin Wright, "Cheap Labor and Southern Textiles 1880-1930" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

Gavin Wright and Martha Shiells, "Night Work" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

Rhonda Zingraff, "Social Bases of Class Consciousness" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 15

Box 16

#04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 16

Data Forms #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 16

Community Tabulations #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 16

Collective Profile of Interviewees by Cathy Abernathy #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 16

Interviewees Profile #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 16

Coding #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 16

Like A Family: Correspondence #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 16

Book Cover Ideas #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 16

Readers' Reports #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 16

Interview Inventory Forms #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 16

Like A Family: Memos, meetings, etc. #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 16

Like A Family--Just About: Prospectus to Other Presses #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 16

Box 17

#04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 17

Prospectus and Outline #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 17

Like A Family #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 17

Like A Family: Drafts, chapters, and pieces #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 17

Comments, Letters #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 17

Index #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 17

Like a Family: Chapter Outline #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 17

Like A Family--Just About: Original prospectus to presses other than UNC #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 17

Box 18

#04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 18

Like a Family: Book Prospectus, June 1982 #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 18

Merrimack Valley Proposal, 1984 #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 18

Like A Family--Just About: Original prospectus to presses other than UNC #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 18

NIU Paper #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 18

Fellowships, 1984-1895 #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 18

NIU Paper #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 18

Mari Jo Buhle, "Future of Labor History,"  Radical Historians Newsletter #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 18

Northern Illinois University Conference, 1984 #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 18

Hall, Korstad, Leloudis: Future of Labor History Conference Essay #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 18

NIU Paper: Revised November 1984 #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 18

NIU Conference Paper: American Historical Review : Like a Family article #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 18

NIU Paper: Comments #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 18

NIU Conference papers: Future of American Labor History #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 18

Box 19

#04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

NIU Conference Papers: Future of American Labor History #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

Like A Family #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

American Historical Review: Correspondence #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

American Historical Review: Nathans, Leuchtenburg, Calhoun #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

Stephen R. Wiley, "Songs of the Gastonia Textile Strike of 1929" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

Mary Heaton Vorse, "Gastonia" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

Larkin, "Ella May's Songs" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

Alabama Strike #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

Management View Amalgated Papers, 1934 #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

New Deal #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

Carl Reeve, "A Million Workers Say Strike" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

Strike, 1934: Notes #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

General Strike, 1934 #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

Janet Irons #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

Charles Eagles, Jonathan Daniels #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

Women's History #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

Reference #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

Theory, Literature #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

Southern Women #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

Industrialization #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

Bibliography, Library Work #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

Books and Articles to Consult #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

Gastonia: Violet Jones Incident #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

Gastonia: Jesse Lloyd #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

Edgar Knight, "The Lessons of Gastonia" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

Gastonia: James Aune, "Argument and Consciousness" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

Singal, "War Within" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

Broadus Mitchell, interviewed by Mary Frederickson #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

Broadus Mitchell, interviewed by Daniel Singal #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 19

Box 20

#04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 20

Mitchell, Singal #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 20

Broadus Mitchell Papers #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 20

Correspondence #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 20

Marion Progress, "Clinchfield Mill Re-Opened" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 20

Marion: Newspapers and Notes #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 20

The Marion Murder #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 20

Tippett: Southern Labor #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 20

Marion Strike: Chronology, Occupational Structure #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 20

Marion Drafts #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 20

The Strikes at Marion, NC #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 20

NIU Paper #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 20

1934 Strike Miscellaneous #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 20

Jacquelyn Hall, "Gender, Class, and Conflict in the Industrializing South" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 20

1929 Strikes: Outline #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 20

Like a Family: Omissions from Chapter Six #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 20

Draft #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 20

J. Hall: Chapter 8 #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 20

Marion Quote for Introduction #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 20

Final Version #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 20

Box 21

#04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 21

Interviews: Strikes and Unions #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 21

Industrialization Overview #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 21

Durham: Sydney Nathans: Class Papers #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 21

Durham: Sydney Nathans: Class Papers #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 21

Durham: Hobbs: Plantation to Factory #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 21

Tyler B. Robbins, "The Work Experience: The Durham Hosiery Mill 1898-1976" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 21

Ken Kornblau #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 21

Durham: Bibliography, Names, Description, Miscellaneous #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 21

Box 22

#04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 22

Dolores Janiewski #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 22

Durham Report #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 22

Charlotte Report #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 22

Charlotte: Working Paper: Leloudis #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 22

Charlotte: "A City in Conflict: The 1919 Charlotte Streetcar Strike" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 22

Rupert Vance: Catawba Valley Industrialization #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 22

Bogue Wallin, "Catawba County" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 22

Aycock, "Catawba County" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 22

Piedmont Industrialization: Catawba County Research Files Papers: Hall and Dilley: Catawba County #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 22

Piedmont Industrialization: Catawba County Research Files Papers: Dilley and Ham: Dulcimer Maker and Factory Worker #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 22

Piedmont Industrialization: Catawba County Research Files Papers: Patty Dilley: Furniture #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 22

Piedmont Industrialization: Bynum Research Files: Primary Source Report, Field Report #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 22

Piedmont Industrialization: Catawba County Research Files Papers: Patty Dilley: Conover #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 22

Piedmont Industrialization: Catawba County Research Files Papers: Robert Bosch: Unionization #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 22

Piedmont Industrialization: Bynum Research Files: Margaret Lee: "Children of the Mill: Three Generations of Changing Culture and Consciousness" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 22

Box 23

#04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 23

Piedmont Industrialization: Bynum Research Files Papers: Douglas De Natale, "Work and Culture in a Piedmont Mill Village" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 23

Piedmont Industrialization: Bynum Research Files Papers: Douglas DeNatale, "Traditional Culture and Community in a Piedmont Textile Mill Village" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 23

Piedmont Industrialization: Burlington Research Files Papers: Cliff Kuhn, "Industrialization in Burlington" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 23

Piedmont Industrialization: Burlington Research Files Papers: Mary Murphy, "Burlington Report" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 23

Piedmont Industrialization: Burlington Research Files Papers: Hosiery Workers of the Carolina Piedmont #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 23

Piedmont Industrialization: Burlington Research Files Papers: Mary Murphy: Field Notes and Research Files #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 23

Piedmont Industrialization: Burlington Research Files: Burlington Industries General Information #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 23

Piedmont Industrialization: Burlington Research Files: Bibliographies, Book Reviews #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 23

Melton McLaurin, "Southern History Through Photographs: Problems and Promises" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 23

Computerized Database for FSA Photography Collection #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 23

Catawba County #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 23

Bynum Quilts #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 23

Alabama, Industrialization #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 23

Archives: Greenville Public Library #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 23

Photographs: American Historical Review Piece #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 23

United States Geological Survey: Maps #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 23

Box 24

#04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 24

Correspondence, 1982: History of Carrboro #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 24

Martha McKeel, "The Changing Role of The Church in Carrboro" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 24

Clarissa Howe, "How People Remember the Depression in Carrboro and What They Did for Entertainment" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 24

Mitzi Long, "Carrboro's Blacks and the University Connection" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 24

Elizabeth Rowe, "Women Who Stayed: The Role of Single Women in Historical Transition" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 24

Janice Sniker, "Community and Continuity in Carrboro" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 24

Emily White, "The Female Experience" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 24

Carrboro Project, Fall 1982 #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 24

Greenville: Historic Preservation #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 24

Greenville Report #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 24

Greenville: Interviewers and Interviewees #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 24

Nannie Mae Tilley, "Agitation Against the American Tobacco Company in North Carolina, 1890-1911" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 24

Durham: Tobacco: Lanier's Notes #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 24

Durham: Union Campaigns #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 24

Durham: Mary Murphy: Writing #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 24

Durham: Blacks #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 24

Potential Interviews #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 24

Durham: Labor History, 1925-1940 #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 24

Dolores Janiewski, "Sisterhood Denied" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 24

Charlotte: Contacts #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 24

Bill Moye Tapes #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 24

Charlotte: Correspondence #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 24

Charlotte: Questions for Follow Up Interviews #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 24

Charlotte: Interviewers #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 24

Box 25

#04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 25

Dolores Janiewski, "From Field to Factory: Race, Class, Sex, and the Woman Worker" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 25

Broyhill #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 25

Contacts #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 25

Bibliography #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 25

Correspondence #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 25

Transcripts of Interviews #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 25

Durham: Transcripts Removed #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 25

Like a Family: Photographs and Notes #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 25

Cramerton Interviews #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 25

"Abraham and Sarah [Galant]: A Family History" #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 25

Evelyn Hardin notes #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 25

Bessie Edens notes #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 25

May 1983 interviews #04007, Subseries: "H.11. Piedmont Industrialization: Like a Family Research Files." Box 25

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse I. Business History.

106 items.

Most interviews in this series focus on the growth and development of traditional and emergent North Carolina industries, including furniture, banking, tobacco products, textiles, poultry, food and food services, tourism, pharmaceuticals, computers, and steel. Some interviewees also discuss the impact of businesses on the communities in which they operate and about the regional, national, and global developments that will affect their future prospects.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse I.1. Hostile Takeover Project.

4 items.

The four Hostile Takeover Project interviews are with representatives of Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company; Heublein, Inc.; Microdot, Inc.; and Richardson-Vicks, Inc. Interviewees talk about their experiences during hostile takeover attempts on their companies. Discussions center around takeover attempts as related both to the individual organizations and to the broader effects of this business practice on the country's economic health. The interviews were conducted in 1989 by William A. Crowther, former director of Marketing Communications, International at Richardson-Vicks.

This project was funded by H. Smith Richardson, Jr., of Wilmington, N.C., and was developed in conjunction with the Oral History Collection at Columbia University, New York, N.Y.

Interviews

Business History: Hostile Takeover Project #04007, Subseries: "I.1. Hostile Takeover Project." Interviews

Folder I

Interviewer William A. Crowther's notes #04007, Subseries: "I.1. Hostile Takeover Project." Folder I

VT-4007/

Video of an interview with Smith Richardson by Bill Friday #04007, Subseries: "I.1. Hostile Takeover Project." VT-4007/

Smith Richardson and Bill Friday discuss hostile takeovers on the North Carolina Public Television program North Carolina People

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse I.2. North Carolina Business History Project.

42 items.

North Carolina Business History Project interviews are with leaders of traditional and emergent North Carolina industries, including furniture, banking, tobacco products, textiles, poultry, food and food services, tourism, pharmaceuticals, computers, and steel. Interviewees describe the origins and evolution of their companies and the changes and problems they confront. They are also asked about the impact of businesses on the communities in which they operate and about the regional, national, and global developments that will affect their future prospects. Included are interviews with Richard Barentine, International Home Furnishings Marketing Association; Lauch Faircloth, politician and businessman; Roger Gant, textile firm president; Dennis B. Gillings, Quintiles Transnational Corp.; James Goodnight, SAS Institute; James A. Graham, North Carolina Commissioner of Agriculture; John Medlin, Wachovia Corporation; Hugh L. McColl, Bank of America; Sherwood H. Smith, CP& Tom E. Smith, Food Lion, Inc.; Robert Sidney Smith, National Association of Hosiery Manufacturers; Jacob Froelich, Froelich Companies; F. Kenneth Iverson, Nucor Corporation; Lonnie Poole, Waste Industries; and S. Davis Phillips (Dave Phillips), Phillips Industries and North Carolina Secretary of Commerce.

The first interviews I-0005 through I-0012, were conducted by Walter E. Campbell. Peter Coclanis, professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill directed the project.

An additional group of interviews, I-0068 through I-0085, conducted by Joe Mosnier, contains interviews with North Carolina business leaders such as James Goodnight of SAS Institute and John Medlin of Wachovia Bank. They explore how North Carolina is faring in the new global economy. Mosnier asked what strategies the state's business leaders adopted as traditional industries floundered and newer pursuits such as computing and agribusiness boomed; how the interviewees attempted to control and respond to these historic trends and changes; and what kind of economic future the interviewees envision for the nation's tenth largest state.

Interviews I-0092 through I-0106, conducted in 1997 by Dorothy Gay Darr, explore four areas of North Carolina business history: tourism, textiles, furniture, and retail. Interviewees include members of the Cecil Family of the Biltmore Estate, owners of hosiery companies, owners of furniture and veneer companies, and a retail executive for the J.C. Penney Company.

Interviews

Business History: North Carolina Business History Project #04007, Subseries: "I.2. North Carolina Business History Project." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse I.3. Hickory Springs Manufacturing Company.

61 items.

Access to these interviews requires express permission of the corporate secretary of Hickory Springs Manufacturing Company. Contact the Southern Oral History Program for further information.

These 61 interviews with 51 individuals selected by the Hickory Springs Manufacturing Company were designed to unearth and preserve knowledge about the company, the families in positions of leadership, the industry, and the region. Hickory Springs Manufacturing Company, founded in 1944 in Hickory, N.C., produces a wide range of bedding and upholstered furniture products, including metal and foam parts and various types of hardware. In 1998, it consisted of 56 plants in 14 states and had a workforce of 3,600 employees. The company was distinguished by an unusually low employee turnover rate.

Three of the company's top executives--Bobby Bush, Jr., vice-president of the Foam Products Division; Rob Simmons, director of the International Department; and Jack Finegan, corporate director of communications--conceived the idea of conducting an oral history project. In 1997, they began working with the Southern Oral History Program to design the project. The Program supervised an independent researcher, Anne Radford Phillips, as she conducted interviews with individuals selected by Hickory Springs.

Interviews

Business History: Hickory Springs Manufacturing Company #04007, Subseries: "I.3. Hickory Springs Manufacturing Company." Interviews

Folder I1

Interview Highlights #04007, Subseries: "I.3. Hickory Springs Manufacturing Company." Folder I1

Folder I2

Interview Highlights #04007, Subseries: "I.3. Hickory Springs Manufacturing Company." Folder I2

Folder I3

Research File #04007, Subseries: "I.3. Hickory Springs Manufacturing Company." Folder I3

Folder I4

Research File #04007, Subseries: "I.3. Hickory Springs Manufacturing Company." Folder I4

Folder I5

Book published by Hickory Springs Manufacturing Company: 60 years: 1944-2004: As Told by the People of Hickory Springs Manufacturing #04007, Subseries: "I.3. Hickory Springs Manufacturing Company." Folder I5

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse J. Legal Professions.

82 items.

Interviews conducted by students of the University of North Carolina School of Law with prominent lawyers and judges in North Carolina. Some of the lawyers interviewed are also politicians, who served in the North Carolina General Assembly or in the United States Congress. Interviewees discuss family and personal life in addition to career, law, legal ethics, and the legal profession. Many interviewees share childhood experiences, memories of World War II or the Vietnam War, college and law school experiences at UNC and elsewhere, and memorable cases. Several interviews, especially those with African American or Native American lawyers and judges, address racial segregation, school integration, and civil rights law. Other interviews address women in the legal profession. Some interviewees discussed the death penalty, and several interviewees describe working with Julius L. Chambers.

These interviews were undertaken as part of a course taught by law professor Walter H. Bennett, Jr. The interviews were subsequently transcribed at the Law School and donated to the Southern Oral History Program Collection.

Interviews

Legal Professions #04007, Series: "J. Legal Professions." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K. Southern Communities.

1079 items.

Series K contains interviews conducted in the course of community studies by students and faculty exploring questions of central concern to the humanities: What is the meaning of community? What role does historical memory play in coping with loss, creating new identities and communities, and becoming agents rather than victims of change?

expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.1. Individual Projects.

369 items.

Interviews in this series explore the meaning of community and the role of historical memory.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.1.1. Cane Creek Project.

25 items.

Cane Creek interviews explore the controversy in the late 1970s and early 1980s between residents of dairy farming community, Cane Creek, N.C., and the Orange County Water and Sewer Authority (OWASA). OWASA's proposal to construct a reservoir that would flood Cane Creek farms threatened a community already beset by economic pressures and government policies that had transformed the practice of farming in the region. Like their counterparts throughout the United States, Cane Creek farmers had been drawn since World War II into mechanized and centralized agricultural practices. Proximity to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and rapid population growth added pressure to the Cane Creek community and led to OWASA's search for new water sources. Residents of Cane Creek organized the Cane Creek Conservation Authority (CCC) to fight OWASA. The CCC lost its battle to stop the resevoir, and construction for the began in January 1987.

The interviews in this series document all sides of the OWASA controversy and reveal the social and cultural dimensions of America's transforming rural life and the political, environmental, and public policy changes of urban growth. The majority of those interviewed were farmers and residents of Cane Creek, but the series includes interviews with OWASA personnel, an attorney, a local politician, a county commissioner, and university employees who lived in the Cane Creek community. Students enrolled in an oral history course in the fall semester of 1985 conducted most of the interviews, but graduate students continued the project through the spring of 1989.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Individual Projects: Cane Creek Project #04007, Subseries: "K.1.1. Cane Creek Project." Interviews

Folder K1

Bylaws and organization #04007, Subseries: "K.1.1. Cane Creek Project." Folder K1

Folder K2

Cane Creek Walker, 1978-1983 #04007, Subseries: "K.1.1. Cane Creek Project." Folder K2

Folder K3

Correspondence #04007, Subseries: "K.1.1. Cane Creek Project." Folder K3

Folder K4

Miscellaneous #04007, Subseries: "K.1.1. Cane Creek Project." Folder K4

Folder K5

Publicity #04007, Subseries: "K.1.1. Cane Creek Project." Folder K5

Slide show scripts #04007, Subseries: "K.1.1. Cane Creek Project." Folder K5

Folder K7

Speeches #04007, Subseries: "K.1.1. Cane Creek Project." Folder K7

Folder K8

Clippings #04007, Subseries: "K.1.1. Cane Creek Project." Folder K8

Folder K9

Clippings #04007, Subseries: "K.1.1. Cane Creek Project." Folder K9

Folder K10

Environmental impact statement, 1980 #04007, Subseries: "K.1.1. Cane Creek Project." Folder K10

Folder K11

Miscellaneous Orange County and OWASA materials #04007, Subseries: "K.1.1. Cane Creek Project." Folder K11

Folder K12

Orange County Agricultural Task Force, 1979 #04007, Subseries: "K.1.1. Cane Creek Project." Folder K12

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.1.2. Coastal Carolina Project.

82 items.

Coastal Carolina interviews focus on North Carolina counties where World War II defense industries and military bases sparked rapid and unprecedented change. The coast with its sharecroppers, small farmers, fishing villages, and timber camps, was transformed as thousands of civilian workers poured into industry, and skilled occupations were available to women and African Americans for the first time.

The project "World War II and After: Memory, Community, and Social Change in Coastal North Carolina," marked the 50th anniversary of World War II and focused on North Carolina counties where defense industries and three of the nation's largest military bases sparked rapid and unprecedented change in the once isolated and self-sufficient coastal communities.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Individual Projects: Coastal Carolina Project #04007, Subseries: "K.1.2. Coastal Carolina Project." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.1.3. White Furniture Company of Mebane Project.

35 items.

Interviews are with residents of Mebane, N.C. and former employees of White Furniture Company of Mebane, which closed its doors in 1993. Interviewees discuss the plant's importance to the town and the history of the company, which until it closed was one of the oldest operating furniture factories in the South.

The impact of plant closings on North Carolina communities was also explored in a photography exhibit on the White Furniture plant that was mounted by photographer and American Studies instructor Bill Bamberger in an abandoned department store. Bamberger and Cathy Davidson used the interviews and photographs in their book Closing: The Life and Death of an American Factory.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Individual Projects: White Furniture Company of Mebane Project #04007, Subseries: "K.1.3. White Furniture Company of Mebane Project." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.1.4. Hindu Temple in Morrisville Project.

8 items.

Interviews are with first and second generation Indian-Americans living in the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill area of North Carolina. Interviewees discuss the desire to preserve Indian culture and heritage in the United States, generational differences in the Indian-American community, gender roles among Indian-Americans, and Hindu religious beliefs and practices.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Individual Projects: Hindu Temple in Morrisville Project #04007, Subseries: "K.1.4. Hindu Temple in Morrisville Project." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.1.5. Mountain Voices.

116 items.

Interviews conducted between 1980 and 1985 by writer Warren Moore Miller explore life in the Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina. Miller interviewed mountain residents including folklorists, university faculty, attorneys, politicians, a former moonshiner, blue collar workers, farmers, craftsmen, and teachers. Among the interviewees were U.S. Senator Sam Ervin, Winston Cup racecar driver Junior Johnson, and ballad singer Cas Wallin. Miller used the interviews in his book Mountain Voices: A Legacy of the Blue Ridge and Great Smokies (Globe Pequot Press, 1988).

Interviews

Southern Communities: Individual Projects: Mountain Voices #04007, Subseries: "K.1.5. Mountain Voices." Interviews

Folder K19

Information about interviewer Warren Moore Miller #04007, Subseries: "K.1.5. Mountain Voices." Folder K19

Folder K20

Index of interviewees and miscellaneous materials relating to Mountain Voices: A Legacy of the Blue Ridge and Great Smokies #04007, Subseries: "K.1.5. Mountain Voices." Folder K20

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.1.6. Chatham Voices.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.1.7 Green River Heritage Area.

7 items.

Interviews are with former and then current residents Henderson County, N.C., in the Green River Valley, which lies on the border between North Carolina and South Carolina. Many interviewees discuss the city of Greenville, S.C. David Schenck directed the "Green River Heritage Area" project, which was initiated by the Green River Preserve and Landowners in the Green River Valley.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Individual Projects: Green River Heritage Area #04007, Subseries: "K.1.7 Green River Heritage Area." Interviews

Folder K.1.7.

Overview of project and "Walking to Greenville: The Legacy of Joe Capps,"booklet by David Schenck #04007, Subseries: "K.1.7 Green River Heritage Area." Folder K.1.7.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.1.8. Southern Communities: Our Stories, In Focus: Chapel Hill/Carrboro.

29 items.

Interviews were conducted in March 2009 for "Our Stories, In Focus", a project sponsored by the Chapel Hill Public Arts Commission and UNC Chapel Hill's Program in the Humanities and Human Values. Project participants with diverse cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds attended workshops where they shared their stories. Topics discussed include family life and upbringing, what brought them to North Carolina, and their relationships to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The interviews were conducted informally with interviewer and interviewee occasionally changing roles.

Many interviewees were students, who share their experiences entering the university and their aspirations for the future. Several interviewees born outside the United States discuss their journeys to North Carolina and offer outside perspectives and observations on the Chapel Hill area.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Individual Projects: Our Stories, In Focus: Chapel Hill/Carrboro #04007, Subseries: "K.1.8. Southern Communities: Our Stories, In Focus: Chapel Hill/Carrboro." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.1.9. Southern Communities: Wilson County During the Depression.

10 items.

Interviews are with longtime residents of Wilson County, N.C., who were children or teenagers from white middle class and affluent homes during the 1930s and 1940s. Parts of the Wilson community, in contrast to most of North Carolina and the nation in the 1930s, prospered because of the tobacco market. The interviewees describe their memories and perceptions of the Great Depression, and they describe their childhood pastimes, friends, families, and the town of Wilson during the 1930s and 1940s.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Individual Projects: Wilson County During the Depression #04007, Subseries: "K.1.9. Southern Communities: Wilson County During the Depression." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.1.10. Southern Communities: Desegregating Cary.

23 items.

Interviews are with longtime residents of Cary, N.C., who were children or teenagers during school desegregation. The interviewees describe their childhood pastimes, friends, families, and the town of Cary between the 1930s and 1960s.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Individual Projects: Desegregating Cary #04007, Subseries: "K.1.10. Southern Communities: Desegregating Cary." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.2. Listening for a Change.

697 items.

Listening for a Change encompasses interviews exploring dramatic changes in North Carolina since World War II and a variety of community-based projects focused on themes of race, public schools, the environment, a rapidly changing global economy, and the continuous influx of new immigrants. The project's name was inspired by the book, Listening for a Change: Oral History and Community Development. Co-authors Hugo Slim and Paul Thompson emphasize the importance of oral history as a form of participatory documentation and a method of historical inquiry that encourages active involvement by community members.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.2.1. Overview Project.

18 items.

Listening for a Change encompasses a series of interviews exploring the dramatic changes in North Carolina since World War II, and a variety of thematic, community-based projects centered primarily on the themes of race and the public schools, the environment, and the impact of a changing global economy and new immigrants. The project's name was inspired by the book, Listening for a Change: Oral History and Community Development, co-authored by Hugo Slim and Paul Thompson, which emphasizes the importance of oral history as a form of participatory documentation, a method of historical inquiry that encourages the active involvement of community members. The overview project is the most wide-ranging component of Listening for a Change. Most interviews are by historian David Cecelski, who traveled around North Carolina seeking individuals who could help explain the epochal changes taking place in the state. Cecelski has described this work as a collage--an attempt to convey a strong sense of the diversity and richness of the state's past. Cecelski's column, "Listening to History," in the Raleigh News and Observer is based on interviews for this project. Additional interviews have been conducted by Melynn Glusman.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change: Overview Project #04007, Subseries: "K.2.1. Overview Project." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.2.2. Listening for a Change: New Immigrants Project.

24 items.

Interviews consider the impact of immigration on North East Central Durham, N.C., a transitional community once composed predominantly of African Americans, but now increasingly Latino. In 1998 and 1999, project directors Alicia Rouverol and Jill Hemming and researchers Colin Austin, Ann Kaplan, and Angela Hornsby conducted 23 interviews with immigrants and with long-time community members from the North East Central neighborhood. The interviews explore how community is created and re-created under such circumstances and how individuals derive a sense of meaning in the midst of major social transformations. Questions focused on daily life in North East Central Durham, what qualities of community each group contributed to the neighborhood, conflicts between groups, and opportunities to build bridges across racial and cultural divides. Five of the interviews were conducted in Spanish.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change: New Immigrants Project #04007, Subseries: "K.2.2. Listening for a Change: New Immigrants Project." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.2.3. Listening for a Change: Jewish Immigrants Project.

6 items.

Interviews conducted by Mark Klempner in 1998 and 1999 explore the recollections of six Jewish immigrants to North Carolina during the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s. These six subjects, all members of the professional class, encountered little or no religious persecution in the South. They describe North Carolina as a polite, warm, and kind community, which they are happy to call home.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change: Jewish Immigrants Project #04007, Subseries: "K.2.3. Listening for a Change: Jewish Immigrants Project." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.2.4. Listening for a Change: Cooleemee Project.

7 items.

Initiated by Leon Fink, professor of history, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, this project was designed to document the history of working-class culture in Cooleemee, N.C. Will Jones interviewed African American residents of Cooleemee, N.C., about their memories of working in the textile mill and living in the town.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change: Cooleemee Project #04007, Subseries: "K.2.4. Listening for a Change: Cooleemee Project." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.2.5. Listening for a Change: West Charlotte High School Project.

13 items.

Interviews conducted by Pamela Grundy focus on school desegregation in Charlotte, N.C. The interviews examine both the process of desegregation and the effects it had on individuals, on race relations, and on the community as a whole. Unlike many southern communities, where desegregation was largely thwarted by large-scale white flight to private institutions or suburban school districts, the combined Charlotte-Mecklenburg County School District achieved a relatively stable racial and economic balance within its schools, largely because of an ambitious busing program (Charlotte was the site of the landmark Swann case, in which system-wide busing to achieve desegregation was given legal force).

Interviews

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change: West Charlotte High School Project #04007, Subseries: "K.2.5. Listening for a Change: West Charlotte High School Project." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.2.6. Listening for a Change: Cary Heritage Museum's Oral History Project.

41 items.

These interviews, conducted by members of the Friends of the Page-Walker Hotel as part of the Cary Heritage Museum's Oral History Project, contribute to the project's mission "to document the history of Cary by recording observations and reminiscences which relate to the character and development of the town." Interviewees include members of prominent Cary, N.C., families; a former mayor; former sharecropping families; long-time community merchants--restaurant, grocery, and barber shop owners; the town's retired chief of police and fire chief; and former Page-Walker Hotel owners.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change: Cary Heritage Museum's Oral History Project #04007, Subseries: "K.2.6. Listening for a Change: Cary Heritage Museum's Oral History Project." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.2.7. Listening for a Change: History of Gay Men and Transgender People in the South.

19 items.

These interviews by Chris McGinnis, an undergraduate at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, were conducted for an independent study in the fall semester of 2000 and for the Southern Oral History Program in 2001-2002. They give a perspective of gay life in the South, with particular emphasis on North Carolina in the 1960s through the 1980s. The interviews chronicle the development of the gay community in the South and explore early gay bars, social events and festivals of the gay community, gay organizations and activism, and places where gay men met and engaged in public sex, among other topics. Included are interviews with Chapel Hill, N.C., town council member Joseph A. Herzenberg and writer Perry Deane Young. Interviews with Angela Brightfeather and Lily Rose DeVee offer perspectives of transgender individuals.

Folder K34 includes supplemental materials related to the project, including the interviewer's term papers and a grant proposal that resulted from this research.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change: History of Gay Men and Transgender People in the South #04007, Subseries: "K.2.7. Listening for a Change: History of Gay Men and Transgender People in the South." Interviews

Folder K34

History of Gay Men and Transgender People in the South #04007, Subseries: "K.2.7. Listening for a Change: History of Gay Men and Transgender People in the South." Folder K34

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.2.8. Listening for a Change: History 170, Oral History Course Project: Desegregation and the Inner Life of Chapel Hill Schools.

24 items.

This is a collection of interviews by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill graduate and undergraduate students who participated in an oral history course in the spring of 2001. The students looked closely at Chapel Hill's troubled effort to dismantle a system of racial segregation in the public schools; the fraught process of creating new, integrated institutions; and the ways in which the memory of those experiences shapes the inner life of schools to this day. The particular focus of the project was Lincoln High School, Chapel Hill's historically black secondary institution, which was closed upon the implementation of the desegregation plan. Interviewees include former teachers, students, and administrators of Lincoln High School and Chapel Hill High School, which was integrated in 1962. Included is an interview with school board member Edwin Caldwell, Jr.

Students researched, conducted, indexed, and transcribed these interviews.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change: History 170, Oral History Course Project: Desegregation and the Inner Life of Chapel Hill Schools #04007, Subseries: "K.2.8. Listening for a Change: History 170, Oral History Course Project: Desegregation and the Inner Life of Chapel Hill Schools." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.2.9. Listening for a Change: Tobacco, History, and Memory: Storytelling and Cultural Grieving in Eastern North Carolina.

12 items.

This collection of interviews by historians Lu Ann Jones and Charlie Thompson explores the dramatic changes in eastern North Carolina tobacco farming and farm communities since World War II. In addition to tracing the history of growing, cultivating, harvesting, and selling tobacco, interviewees speculate about what current developments in tobacco politics may mean for the future of tobacco farming. This series also contains two interviews conducted by students under the direction of Dr. Jacquelyn Hall during the Spring 2011 semester at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change: History 170, Oral History Course Project: Tobacco, History, and Memory: Storytelling and Cultural Grieving in Eastern North Carolina #04007, Subseries: "K.2.9. Listening for a Change: Tobacco, History, and Memory: Storytelling and Cultural Grieving in Eastern North Carolina." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.2.10. Listening for a Change: Segregation and Integration of North Carolina Athletics Programs.

4 items.

This collection of interviews was conducted by Pamela Grundy as part of her research for a book on North Carolina athletics, Learning to Win: Sport, Education and Social Change in Twentieth-Century North Carolina (University of North Carolina Press, 2001). The interviews with John McLendon and James Ross deal largely with African American sport during segregation. Ross's interview also contains a good deal of material on African American community life generally. The interviews with William Friday and Susan Shackelford deal with athletics and integration. The Shackelford interview focuses on the integration of high school cheerleading, and also contains some observations about school integration in general.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change: History 170, Oral History Course Project: Segregation and Integration of North Carolina Athletics Programs #04007, Subseries: "K.2.10. Listening for a Change: Segregation and Integration of North Carolina Athletics Programs." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.2.11. Listening for a Change: Tradition and Development in Madison County's I-26 Corridor.

14 items.

This collection of interviews by Rob Amberg documents the construction of a nine-mile section of Interstate 26. Amberg explored the history of daily life in the once isolated community of eastern Madison County and considered the consequences of highway development on community interaction and sense of place. Interviewees include the county sheriff; a probation officer; an environmental activist; the resident highway engineer of the I-26 Corridor project; self-described hippies who moved to Madison County in the early 1970s to live off the land; the mayor of Mars Hill, N.C.; and the town manager of Mars Hill, N.C.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change: Tradition and Development in Madison County's I-26 Corridor #04007, Subseries: "K.2.11. Listening for a Change: Tradition and Development in Madison County's I-26 Corridor." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.2.12. Listening for a Change: Cambodian Community in Greensboro, N.C.

6 items.

These interviews by folklorist Barbara Lau focus on the experience of growing up Cambodian in Greensboro. They are part of Lau's ongoing research project concerning Cambodian refugee communities in North Carolina. Since 1992, Lau has been documenting folklife traditions, community and family ceremonies, and personal experiences of Cambodians in North Carolina. Photographs, videotapes, and audiotapes documenting this work may be found in the Barbara Lau Collection (#20055), Southern Folklife Collection.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change: Cambodian Community in Greensboro, N.C. #04007, Subseries: "K.2.12. Listening for a Change: Cambodian Community in Greensboro, N.C." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.2.13. Listening for a Change: Voices after the Deluge: Oral History Investigations of the Great North Carolina Flood.

86 items.

Interviews with flood victims, rescue workers, relief workers, ministers, farmers, farm workers, small-business owners, environmental monitors, and political leaders in eastern North Carolina about the devastating flooding in the aftermath of Hurricane Floyd. In the fall of 1999, soon after the flood, the Southern Oral History Program set out to document the catastrophe and to assess the environmental, political, and economic consequences of the disaster, as well as its impact on individual lives. Many broad themes emerged from the interviews: the sweeping toll of the flood on human lives; the disruptions to community and sense of place; the character of political response to the disaster at local, state, and national levels; public health and environmental issues arising from the flooding; the effect of the disaster on the region's most vulnerable residents, including children, the elderly, and lower-income families, and the experiences of relief workers. Interviews by Jay Barnes for his book, Faces From the Flood: Hurricane Floyd Remembered , explore the impact of the floods and offer parallels between memory of the hurricane and memory of other recent tragedies, particularly the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001.

Accompanied by photographer Rob Amberg, project coordinator Charlie Thompson led the effort. UNC Chapel Hill doctoral student Katie Otis and award-winning North Carolina reporter Leda Hartman also conducted interviews. Interviews by Jay Barnes were conducted with emergency workers, community volunteers, business owners, and survivors.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change: Voices after the Deluge: Oral History Investigations of the Great North Carolina Flood #04007, Subseries: "K.2.13. Listening for a Change: Voices after the Deluge: Oral History Investigations of the Great North Carolina Flood." Interviews

Folder K30

Voices after the Deluge: Institutional Review Board application #04007, Subseries: "K.2.13. Listening for a Change: Voices after the Deluge: Oral History Investigations of the Great North Carolina Flood." Folder K30

Folder K32

Interview questions #04007, Subseries: "K.2.13. Listening for a Change: Voices after the Deluge: Oral History Investigations of the Great North Carolina Flood." Folder K32

Folder K33

News and journal articles about Hurricane Floyd #04007, Subseries: "K.2.13. Listening for a Change: Voices after the Deluge: Oral History Investigations of the Great North Carolina Flood." Folder K33

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.2.14. Listening for a Change: School Desegregation: Davidson Student Interviews.

20 items.

Interviews conducted for a class on oral history and school desegregation taught by Pamela Grundy at Davidson College in the spring of 1999. They deal with aspects of school desegregation in the town of Mooresville, in Iredell County, and in Davidson, N.C. The most comprehensive set of interviews deals with the history of the Ada Jenkins School, which was the African American school in Davidson until it was closed in 1965.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change: School Desegregation: Davidson Student Interviews #04007, Subseries: "K.2.14. Listening for a Change: School Desegregation: Davidson Student Interviews." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.2.15. Listening for a Change: School Desegregation: Davidson-Johnson C. Smith Student Interviews.

32 items.

Interviews by members of a Davidson College-Johnson C. Smith University oral history class conducted by Pamela Grundy. In the spring of 2001, the class focused on school desegregation in Mecklenburg County, N.C. The interviews concentrate on desegregation at West Charlotte High School, a historically black school in the center of Charlotte, and North Mecklenburg High School, a historically white school in the northern part of Mecklenburg County.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change: Davidson-Johnson C. Smith Student Interviews #04007, Subseries: "K.2.15. Listening for a Change: School Desegregation: Davidson-Johnson C. Smith Student Interviews." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.2.16. Listening for a Change: School Desegregation in Charlotte, N.C.

17 items.

Interviews by Pamela Grundy focusing on school desegregation in Charlotte, N.C. The interviews examine both the process of desegregation and the effects it had on individuals, on race relations, and on the community as a whole. Unlike many southern communities, in which desegregation was largely thwarted by large-scale white flight to private institutions or suburban school districts, the combined Charlotte-Mecklenburg County school district managed to achieve a relatively stable racial and economic balance within its schools, chiefly because of an ambitious busing program.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change: School Desegregation in Charlotte, N.C. #04007, Subseries: "K.2.16. Listening for a Change: School Desegregation in Charlotte, N.C." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.2.17. Listening for a Change: Asian Voices.

14 items.

An oral history project documenting the immigration stories of South Asians in Chapel Hill and Carrboro, N.C. The project was conceived by Andrew Jilani and funded in November 1998 by the North Carolina Humanities Council.

Folder K-xvii contains a copy of South Asian Voices: Oral Histories of South Asian Immigrants in Chapel Hill and Carrboro, North Carolina , a book based on the interviews conducted as part of this project.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change: Asian Voices #04007, Subseries: "K.2.17. Listening for a Change: Asian Voices." Interviews

Folder K17

South Asian Voices: Oral Histories of South Asian Immigrants in Chapel Hill and Carrboro, North Carolina #04007, Subseries: "K.2.17. Listening for a Change: Asian Voices." Folder K17

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.2.18. Listening for a Change: Southern Louisiana Environmentalism.

7 items.

Interviews exploring environmentalism in Louisiana. Eugene Ford and Paul Francke, undergraduate students at the University of Chicago, conducted the interviews in August 2000, while they were working as summer interns with the Southern Oral History Program.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change: Southern Louisiana Environmentalism #04007, Subseries: "K.2.18. Listening for a Change: Southern Louisiana Environmentalism." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.2.19. Listening for a Change: Stephens-Lee High School, Asheville, N.C.

10 items.

Interviews by Kelly Navies explore the history of Stephens-Lee High School in Asheville, N.C. Built in 1923, Stephens-Lee was for many decades western North Carolina's only secondary school for African Americans. The school drew students from Buncombe, Henderson, Madison, Yancey, and Transylvania counties, and represented a focal point and a key source of pride for the extended African American community in the state's western region. In 1965, however, the all-white school board closed Stephens-Lee as part of its desegregation plan, and, in 1975, the entire multi-building campus, except for the gymnasium, was bulldozed. Navies interviewed former faculty, administrators, and students of Stephens-Lee to collect memories of the school and to assess the impact of desegregation and the school's closing on the black community in western North Carolina.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change: #04007, Subseries: "K.2.19. Listening for a Change: Stephens-Lee High School, Asheville, N.C." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.2.20. Listening for a Change: Mighty Tigers--Oral Histories of Chapel Hill's Lincoln High School.

60 items.

Interviews by Bob Gilgor, a retired doctor and Chapel Hill, N.C., documentarian, with teachers, staff, and alumni from Lincoln High School, Chapel Hill's historically black secondary institution. The school was closed during the implementation of school desegregation in Chapel Hill in 1962. Interviewees discuss African American life and race relations in Chapel Hill, as well as education, discipline, extracurricular activities, and social life in high school before and after school integration.

RESTRICTION: None of these interviews may be copied. Researchers must obtain written permission of interviewee, interviewer, director of the Southern Oral History Program, or director of the Chapel Hill Museum for publication. Some interviews have further restrictions on access or use.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change: #04007, Subseries: "K.2.20. Listening for a Change: Mighty Tigers--Oral Histories of Chapel Hill's Lincoln High School." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.2.21. Listening for a Change: Terra Ceia Community.

5 items.

Interviews focusing on the life histories and experiences of residents in Terra Ceia, a Dutch community founded in Beaufort County, N.C., in the 1930s. The people of Terra Ceia have been successful farmers of flowers, soybeans, corn, and other crops, and have created and sustained several community institutions, including the Terra Ceia Christian Reformed Church, the Terra Ceia Christian School, and an annual Dutch festival.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change: #04007, Subseries: "K.2.21. Listening for a Change: Terra Ceia Community." Interviews

Folder K18

Primary source materials provided by interviewer Melynn Glusman related to Terra Ceia, N.C. #04007, Subseries: "K.2.21. Listening for a Change: Terra Ceia Community." Folder K18

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.2.22. Listening for a Change: North Carolina Churches.

5 items.

Interviews exploring church history and Christian life in North Carolina with a particular focus on African American denominations, race relations, and civil rights activism within church communities.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change: #04007, Subseries: "K.2.22. Listening for a Change: North Carolina Churches." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.2.23. African Americans in Georgia.

171 items.

Interviews conducted by Mark Schultz between 1988 and 2005 in several Georgia counties about the primary ways that white and black lives actually intersected there in the years between 1910 and 1950. Interviewees include black and white landowners, tenants, lumber workers, tradesmen, soldiers, teachers, and preachers; men and women; and migrants to northern cities and lifelong Georgia residents. Interviews conducted before 2004 form the basis for Schultz's book The Rural Face of White Supremacy: Beyond Jim Crow (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2005). Hancock County interviews were also used for his Ph.D. dissertation, Unsolid South: An Oral History of Race, Class, and Geography in Hancock County, Georgia, 1910-1950 (University of Chicago, 1999).

The former title of this project is "African Americans in Hancock County, Georgia." The majority of interviews in this collection are with residents of Hancock County; the remaining interviewees include residents of the Georgia counties of Banks, Clarke, Elbert, Hall, and Stephens.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change: #04007, Subseries: "K.2.23. African Americans in Georgia." Interviews

Folder K13

Ph.D. dissertation of Mark Schultz: "Unsolid South: An Oral History of Race, Class, and Geography in Hancock County, Georgia, 1910-1950" #04007, Subseries: "K.2.23. African Americans in Georgia." Folder K13

Folder K14-K16

Interviewer's notes on people and places in Hancock County #04007, Subseries: "K.2.23. African Americans in Georgia." Folder K14-K16

Data Compact Disc DCD-4007/K21

Photographs of people and places in Hancock County #04007, Subseries: "K.2.23. African Americans in Georgia." DCD-4007/K21

Folder K21

Interviewer's notes about photographs on DCD-4007/K-xxi #04007, Subseries: "K.2.23. African Americans in Georgia." Folder K21

Folder K22

Funeral program of Reverend Robert Edwards #04007, Subseries: "K.2.23. African Americans in Georgia." Folder K22

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse K.2.24. The Maya of Morganton.

97 items.

These interviews, conducted by Leon Fink, explore the ways in which the small town of Morganton, Burke County, N.C., has been transformed with the arrival of Guatemalan immigrants. Interviews touch on community life and culture in Morganton as well as on Guatemala and on the immigrants' effort to unionize the local poultry plant, Case Farms, where they were employed. Fink's book, The Maya of Morganton: Work and Community in the Nuevo New South (UNC Press, 2003) draws on these interviews.

Interviews

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change: #04007, Subseries: "K.2.24. The Maya of Morganton." Interviews

Folder K35

The Maya of Morganton: Work and Community in the Nuevo New South #04007, Subseries: "K.2.24. The Maya of Morganton." Folder K35

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse L. University of North Carolina.

366 items.

Interviews about the University of North Carolina, originally developed as part of the University's bicentennial celebration in 1993, but currently an ongoing project. Some interviews focus on specific aspects of university life; others document the birth and growth of particular schools, institutes, or programs within the university, including the Campus Y, the School of Medicine, the Dept. of Radio, Television, and Motion Pictures, the School of Nursing, the School of Public Health, and the Institute of Government. Others record more general information about the institution, including women's athletics, student activism, civil rights, student life, and women faculty and administrators. Interviewees include members of University of North Carolina classes from the 1920s and 1930s; former and current professors and administration personnel, including historians who have studied or taught at the University; and former student activists, civil rights leaders, and other campus leaders. Also included are a series of interviews that William A. Link, professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, conducted with family, friends, and associates of William C. Friday, in preparation for his biography, William Friday: Power, Purpose, & American Higher Education (1995). Major topics include the expansion of the University of North Carolina system from three institutions to sixteen, the establishment of a medical school at East Carolina University and a veterinary school at North Carolina State University, the role of the federal government in the affairs of the University, the interaction of the United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare's Office for Civil Rights with University administrators, intercollegiate athletics, the Dixie Classic basketball scandal, the North Carolina speaker ban law, and racial integration of the University. Some interviews also address Friday's early life and education; his role in the development of the National Humanities Center, the Research Triangle Park, and the North Carolina Rural Economic Development Center; his involvement in antipoverty and literacy movements; and his work as head of the William Rand Kenan, Jr., Fund and the Kenan Charitable Trust. Additional subjects of interest are the role of Friday and the University in state politics and Friday's work on the White House Task Force on Education, the Carnegie Commission on the Future of American Education, and the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics. There is also a small number of interviews about North Carolina politics and the University. A series of interviews relate to the role of minority faculty and women faculty on the campus between 1960 and 1990. Issues include hiring practices, tenure and promotion policies, department cultures, discrimination, and affirmative action. A small number of interviews are focused on the role of Kenan Professors in the University. There are also interviews exploring the history of the School of Medicine and UNC Hospitals.

Related materials include:

  • Southern Oral History Program Collection, Interview A-344 (Alexander Heard) (#4007)
  • Southern Oral History Program Collection, Interviews C-89-100 and Series J (University of North Carolina School of Law Oral History Project)
  • Shelby Foote Papers, Folder 1/P-4038 (photograph of Shelby Foote and Walker Percy)

expand/collapse Expand/collapse L.1. University of North Carolina: Individual Biographies.

93 items.

This collection of interviews is comprised of single oral histories with notable individuals in University of North Carolina history.

Interviews

University of North Carolina: Individual Biographies #04007, Subseries: "L.1. University of North Carolina: Individual Biographies." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse L.2. University of North Carolina: Anne Queen and the Campus Y.

32 items.

Interviews pertain to the Campus Y, a UNC Chapel Hill student organization established in 1859, and to Anne Queen, its director from 1964 to 1975. Most of the interviews with former Campus Y student leaders, alumni, staff, and university administration were conducted in 1990 by C. Cheatham and in 2010 as part of the 150th Anniversary celebration of the Campus Y. Interviews include recollections of personal experiences with the Campus Y, reflections on social justice movements and students' development of social consciousness, and advice for students who become involved with the Campus Y. Major topics include Anne Queen's directorship and other staff support, student leadership and community, work in post-college life, and the 150th Anniversary.

The Campus Y spurred the creation of UNC's campus bookstore and the institution of first-year student orientation, intramural athletics, and the Carolina Symposium. It participated in the launching of the Student Environmental Action coalition (SEAC), the Student Coalition for Action in Literacy Education (SCALE), and Nourish International. The Campus Y was involved with the integration effort in UNC's undergraduate program, the local civil rights movement, Vietnam War and anti-apartheid protests, the overturning of t he North Carolina speaker ban law, the Foodworkers' Strikes of 1969 and 1970, and other major social movements.

Interviews

University of North Carolina: Anne Queen and the Campus Y #04007, Subseries: "L.2. University of North Carolina: Anne Queen and the Campus Y." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse L.3. University of North Carolina: Women's Sports at UNC.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse L.4. University of North Carolina: UNC School of Law.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse L.5. University of North Carolina: UNC School of Public Health.

13 items.

Interviews conducted between 1988 and 1989 by Robert Korstad pertain to the UNC School of Public Health.

Interviews

University of North Carolina: UNC School of Public Health #04007, Subseries: "L.5. University of North Carolina: UNC School of Public Health." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse L.6. University of North Carolina: UNC Historians Project.

10 items.

The Southern Historians Project interviews conducted by historian Dewey Grantham between 1981 and 1983 are with historians who studied or taught at UNC Chapel Hill.

Interviews

University of North Carolina: UNC Historians Project #04007, Subseries: "L.6. University of North Carolina: UNC Historians Project." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse L.7. University of North Carolina: William Friday Project.

105 items.

Interviews conducted by William A. Link, professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, with family, friends, and associates of William C. Friday, Head of the UNC system from 1956-1986, in preparation for Link's biography, William Friday: Power, Purpose, and American Higher Education (University of North Carolina Press, 1995). Major topics include the expansion of the University of North Carolina System; the role of the federal government in the affairs of the University; intercollegiate athletics; the North Carolina speaker ban law; and racial integration of the University. Some interviews also address Friday's early life and education; his role in North Carolina politics, development, and philanthropy; and his involvement in antipoverty, literacy, and education movements. Additional subjects of interest are the role of Friday and the University in state politics and Friday's work on the White House Task Force on Education, the Carnegie Commission on the Future of American Education, and the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics.

Interviews

University of North Carolina: William Friday Project #04007, Subseries: "L.7. University of North Carolina: William Friday Project." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse L.8. University of North Carolina: Albert Coates Project.

22 items.

Conducted between 2004 and 2005 by Molly Matlock Parsons and Montgomery Wolf, these interviews focus on the character, philosophies, and career of Albert Coates, UNC Chapel Hill alumnus, law professor, and founder with his wife Gladys Hall Coates of UNC's Institute of Government (now School of Government). This project, part of research for a biography of Albert Coates, was conceived by Gladys Coates and funded by the Albert and Gladys Coates Endowment Fund.

Interviews marked with an asterisk (*) are closed or restricted.

Interviews

University of North Carolina: Albert Coates Project #04007, Subseries: "L.8. University of North Carolina: Albert Coates Project." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse L.9. University of North Carolina: William Friday Documentary Project.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse L.10. University of North Carolina: University Faculty and Diversity, 1960-1990.

18 items.

Relating to an SOHP-coordinated and Association for Women Faculty (AWFP)-initiated project commemorating the AWFP's 30th anniversary, these interviews were conducted in 2007 and 2008 with professors, activists, and other community members. Founded at UNC Chapel Hill in 1978 by leading women faculty and administrators, the AWFP seeks to advance the status of women on campus. The interviews address changing hiring practices, tenure and promotion policies, department cultures, discrimination and affirmative action, and the role of minority and women faculty on campus between 1960 and 1990.

Interviews

University of North Carolina: University Faculty and Diversity, 1960-1990 #04007, Subseries: "L.10. University of North Carolina: University Faculty and Diversity, 1960-1990." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse L.11. University of North Carolina: School of Medicine and UNC Hospitals.

20 items.

These interviews explore the history of the University of North Carolina School of Medicine and UNC Hospitals.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse L.11.1. University of North Carolina: UNC Hospital Volunteer Association Board.

3 items.

Jennifer Donnally conducted these three interviews with past UNC Hospital Volunteers Association Board members in Spring 2010 to accompany the organization's papers, deposited in Fall 2010 in the University Archives. The interviews cover the Volunteer Association from its founding in 1952 to 2010. Topics include the Volunteer Association's relationship to the hospital, duties and responsibilities of volunteers, developments within the UNC Hospital system, and UNC Hospital's relationship to the wider North Carolina community.

Interviews

University of North Carolina: School of Medicine and UNC Hospitals: UNC Hospital Volunteer Association Board #04007, Subseries: " L.11.1. University of North Carolina: UNC Hospital Volunteer Association Board." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse L.11.2. University of North Carolina: North Carolina Memorial Hospital Oral History Project.

17 items.

This body of interviews was conducted by students at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine (UNCSOM) during the fall 2012 semester as an assignment for Dr. Raul Necochea's seminar: The Revenge of the Sick: History of Medicine from the Patient's Point of View. The students interviewed clinicians who worked at North Carolina Memorial Hospital from the 1950s to the 1970s. The interviews were guided by the question, "What was considered 'good doctoring' decades ago?" These interviews seek to provide perspective on how definitions of medical competence and professionalism change and remain over time by asking experienced clinicians for stories that illustrate their training and how they practiced in circumstances that may be different from those today. The interviews also contribute to the institutional memory of the UNCSOM by preserving testimonies of older practitioners familiar with the history of the University of North Carolina Health Care System.

Interviews

University of North Carolina: School of Medicine and UNC Hospitals: North Carolina Memorial Hospital Oral History Project #04007, Subseries: " L.11.2. University of North Carolina: North Carolina Memorial Hospital Oral History Project." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse L.12. University of North Carolina: Reflections on University Leadership.

3 items.

In 1997, professors Jacquelyn Hall and Della Pollock conducted a small series of interviews with UNC Chapel Hill faculty members on the qualities of leadership in a university setting.

Interviews

University of North Carolina: Reflections on University Leadership #04007, Subseries: "L.12. University of North Carolina: Reflections on University Leadership." Interviews

Folder L12

Trudier Harris Notes. #04007, Subseries: "L.12. University of North Carolina: Reflections on University Leadership." Folder L12

This interview by Jacquelyn Hall and Della Pollock has no audio or transcript, but interview notes are supplied. Trudier Harris briefly discusses her family life and childhood in Alabama. She recalls her education and early work experiences at the College of William and Mary. The bulk of the interview focuses on her time as a professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Harris discusses teaching, issues of race as they related to her work at UNC, and conflicts surrounding the Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History. The interview ends with some discussion of Harris's time as a professor at Emory University and her personal life.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse L.13. University of North Carolina: North Carolina Area Health Education Centers (AHEC).

13 items.

The North Carolina Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) program began in 1972 with three AHEC regions under a federal AHEC contract with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's School of Medicine. In 1997, the Southern Oral History Program began a series of interviews to document the early years and growth of AHEC in North Carolina. These interviews highlight transitions in medicine as well as service to smaller communities in the state. Karen Kruse Thomas served as lead interviewer on the project.

Interviews

University of North Carolina: North Carolina Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) #04007, Subseries: "L.13. University of North Carolina: North Carolina Area Health Education Centers (AHEC)." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse L.14. University of North Carolina: Kenan Professors.

1 item.

Funded by a gift from the William Rand Kenan Jr. Charitable Trust, this set of interviews looks at faculty careers at UNC Chapel Hill with a special emphasis on the role played by Kenan Professors at in the life of the university.

Interviews

University of North Carolina: Kenan Professors #04007, Subseries: "L.14. University of North Carolina: Kenan Professors." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse M. Black High School Principals.

34 items.

Interviews with black high school principals in North Carolina conducted by Goldie Frinks Wells, a doctoral candidate at UNC Chapel Hill, as part of research for her dissertation, "A Comparison of the Role Perceptions of Black High School Principals." Respondents, African Americans who held the post of principal in 1964 and African American principals in 1991, spoke on topics including job responsibilities, demands, accomplishments, and rewards; education and the black community; racism and discrimination; school administration; and personal background and character traits. The project focused on the influence of desegregation on black high school principals' perceptions on their work roles.

Interviews

Black High School Principals #04007, Series: "M. Black High School Principals." Interviews

Folder M1

Black High School Principals: Project information #04007, Series: "M. Black High School Principals." Folder M1

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse N. Undergraduate Internship Program.

34 items.

Beginning in fall 2012, the Southern Oral History Program has conducted an undergraduate internship program for students to gain experiential education in the intellectual, organizational, and practical work of oral history. Each semester, the interns engage in research by conducting an oral history project, usually related to student activism at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse N.1. Undergraduate Internship Program: Fall 2012.

9 items.

In fall 2012, the interns conducted nine interviews on varied topics, including generational differences, race, environmentalism, and domestic workers.

Interviews

Undergraduate Internship Program: Fall 2012 #04007, Subseries: "N.1. Undergraduate Internship Program: Fall 2012." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse N.2. Undergraduate Internship Program: Spring 2013.

9 items.

In spring 2013, the interns focused on the Speaker Ban controversy at UNC Chapel Hill. During the 1960s, the North Carolina state government issued a ban on known communists or other similar agitators from speaking on any North Carolina campus. Students and UNC Chapel Hill administrators contested this ban in different ways. The interviews highlight students who actively worked to end the ban.

Interviews

Undergraduate Internship Program: Spring 2013 #04007, Subseries: "N.2. Undergraduate Internship Program: Spring 2013." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse N.3. Undergraduate Internship Program: Fall 2013.

8 items.

For the 2013-2014 school year, interns researched the sexual revolution at UNC Chapel Hill from the 1960s onward. In particular, the interviews focus on LGBTQ issues and activism. They interviewed former students, current and former professors, and others from the Chapel Hill and North Carolina communities. The interviews cover a broad range of issues including LGBTQ student activism, social life, culture, challenges, identity, health and wellness, the Carolina Gay Association (now the Sexuality and Gender Alliance) and the newsletter Lambda.

Interviews

Undergraduate Internship Program: Fall 2013 #04007, Subseries: "N.3. Undergraduate Internship Program: Fall 2013." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse N.4. Undergraduate Internship Program: Spring 2014.

8 items.

For the 2013-2014 school year, interns researched the sexual revolution at UNC Chapel Hill from the 1960s onward. In particular, the interviews focus on LGBTQ issues and activism. They interviewed former students, current and former professors, and others from the Chapel Hill and North Carolina communities. The interviews cover a broad range of issues including LGBTQ student activism, social life, culture, challenges, identity, health and wellness, the Carolina Gay Association (now the Sexuality and Gender Alliance) and the newsletter Lambda.

Interviews

Undergraduate Internship Program: Spring 2014 #04007, Subseries: "N.4. Undergraduate Internship Program: Spring 2014." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse O. Foundation History: North Carolina Fund.

40 items.

Coordinated by James Leloudis of the UNC Chapel Hill History Department and Robert Korstad of the Terry Sanford Institute of Public Policy at Duke University, these interviews with former student volunteers, foundation officers, federal and state policy makers, and community residents were conducted as part of a project on race, poverty, and the North Carolina Fund (NCF). Also included are tapes and transcripts of sessions from a 1996 conference in Durham, NC, "No Easy Walk: Lessons and Legacies from the North Carolina Fund" and interviews conducted by UNC Chapel Hill students in 2011 under the direction of Dr. Jacquelyn Hall. Interviews highlight the NCF's position as an intermediary between local organizations and communities, and between federal government and private philanthropy. Respondents discuss their personal and professional backgrounds, their connections to and experiences with the NCF and its impact, details about their respective communities, and issues of poverty, inequality, and public policy.

Interviews

Black High School Principals #04007, Series: "O. Foundation History: North Carolina Fund." Interviews

Folder O1

Invitation letter, conference program, and syllabus #04007, Series: "O. Foundation History: North Carolina Fund." Folder O1

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Q. African American Life and Culture.

141 items.

Beginning in 1981, James Eddie (James Edward) McCoy of Oxford, N.C., conducted interviews with elderly black citizens (80 to 100 years old) of disparate backgrounds in Granville County, N.C. Topics include family life, lineage, and history; agricultural and other labor; religious life; education; and black communities. These interviews bring to life the tobacco fields of Antioch, the cotton plantations of Oak Hill, the church services at Black Cat, and the hustle and bustle of black neighborhoods like Grab-All in Oxford. They tell what daily life was like in the black orphanage at Oxford, at Mary Potter School, and in lumber camps and cotton fields. The collection also includes interviews with McCoy by interviewer Kelly Navies. This series was processed with support from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission.

This series was processed with support from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission.

Interviews

African American Life and Culture #04007, Series: "Q. African American Life and Culture." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R. Special Research Projects.

676 items.

Interviews in this series were conducted for special projects by researchers, many of whom received stipends from the Southern Oral History Program for their projects.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.1. Special Research Projects: War on Poverty in North Carolina.

1 item.

Erika LeMay, graduate student in the Department of History, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, conducted these interviews for her master's thesis on the war on poverty in North Carolina. Her focus was the grassroots organization of the People's Program on Poverty (PPOP) in northeastern North Carolina.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: War on Poverty in North Carolina #04007, Subseries: "R.1. Special Research Projects: War on Poverty in North Carolina." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.2. Special Research Projects: Latinos in North Carolina.

4 items.

Enrique Murillo, a Ph.D. candidate in the Social Foundations of Education program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has research interests in diversity, identity, and the social construction of Latino communities. In these interviews, interviewees reveal their experiences as Mexican nationals migrating to North Carolina. Discussion includes agricultural work, community involvement (especially with the Catholic Church), the change in Latino and Latina roles, and subsequent identity changes caused by different status and circumstance. Other important themes include family and education.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Latinos in North Carolina #04007, Subseries: "R.2. Special Research Projects: Latinos in North Carolina." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.3. Special Research Projects: Hindu Community in the Raleigh-Durham Area.

5 items.

Jennifer Saunders conducted interviews for her master's thesis at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill about the development of the Hindu community in the Raleigh-Durham area and the role of the Hindu temple in this process. Interviews focus on the change and development of the Indian community in the United States, especially within North Carolina. The role of the temple receives special emphasis as a place where community can be built and a site where diverse Asian religious and cultural traditions can integrate with each other.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Hindu Community in the Raleigh-Durham Area #04007, Subseries: "R.3. Special Research Projects: Hindu Community in the Raleigh-Durham Area." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.4. Special Research Projects: Integration and Health Care in North Carolina.

9 items.

Karen Kruse Thomas, a Ph.D. candidate in history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, conducted these interviews as part of a series of interviews with North Carolina health professionals about the origins and growth of the modern health care system, focusing on integration and its effects on health policy. The interviews contain descriptions of medical training and experiences with a focus on changes in medicine brought about by desegregation, new technology, "socialized medicine" and Medicare, and federal health care programs. Special attention is given to the experiences and activism of African American medical students and African American practitioners. There is also a strong focus on the University of North Carolina School of Medicine.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Integration and Health Care in North Carolina #04007, Subseries: "R.4. Special Research Projects: Integration and Health Care in North Carolina." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.5. Special Research Projects: Lily May Ledford.

5 items.

Lisa J. Yarger, graduate student in the Curriculum of Folklore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, conducted these interviews as part of her research for a master's thesis on the life and performing career of musician Lily May Ledford. Ledford was the most well-known member of the Coon Creek Girls, an all-girl hillbilly string band. The interviews offer insights into the lives of mountain women, folk life, women musicians, Depression era radio, the folk revival, and touch on Renfro Valley and manager John Lair.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Lily May Ledford #04007, Subseries: "R.5. Special Research Projects: Lily May Ledford." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.6. Special Research Projects: The African American Working Class, 1930s-1950s.

20 items.

William Jones, graduate student in history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, conducted interviews that reveal the experiences of the African American working class during the shift from agriculture to industrialization in the 1930s to 1950s. Race relations within textile mills and the lumber industry in Elizabethtown, N.C., Chapman, Ala., and Bogalusa, La., are explored, as are diversities, tensions, and leadership within labor unions. African American leadership during the Elizabethtown, N.C., strike and several strikes in Chapman, Ala., are also discussed. Jones added to his research by interviewing the Green brothers, owners of the Green Brothers Lumber Company in Elizabethtown, N.C., and Mason McGowin, son of the McGowins who operated the W. T. Smith Company in Chapman, Ala. In Alabama and Louisiana, Jones also asked some interviewees about leisure time activities, including music and dancing.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: The African American Working Class, 1930s-1950s #04007, Subseries: "R.6. Special Research Projects: The African American Working Class, 1930s-1950s." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.7. Special Research Projects: Gateway Transitional Families Program.

10 items.

Life history interviews with graduates and dropouts from the Gateway Transitional Families Program. The Gateway Program was authorized by Section 126 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1987 (Public Law 100-242, approved 5 February 1988), which allowed the Charlotte Housing Authority (CHA) to develop a program to help public housing residents become socially and economically self-sufficient so that they could buy their own homes. Public housing residents and people on the public housing waiting list entered the program and typically spent two years getting the education they needed to obtain jobs that paid at least $8.00 per hour. They could spend up to another five years strengthening their employment skills and increasing their incomes. Savings were encouraged through the use of escrow savings accounts, where a portion of the participant's rent goes into a bank account for the purpose of saving for a down payment for a home.

These interviews were done as part of an evaluation of the program, funded by the Ford Foundation. Six interviews were completed, three with program graduates and three with women who had dropped out of the program. The purpose was to examine thoroughly the lives of these women to describe their experiences with the program, their life histories leading up to the program, and factors that contributed to their graduation or dropping out. Only four of the women interviewed agreed to have their tapes deposited in the Southern Oral History Program Collection. The interviewer was Rachel Garshick Kleit. For more information about the program and its results, see:

  • Rohe, William M. 1995. "Assisting residents of public housing achieve self-sufficiency: evaluation of Charlotte's Gateway Families Program." Journal of Architectural and PlanningResearch 12, 3: 259-276.
  • Rohe, William M. and Rachel Garshick Kleit. 1997. "From dependency to self-sufficiency: an appraisal of the Gateway Transitional Families Program." Housing Policy Debate 7, 1: 75-108.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Gateway Transitional Families Program #04007, Subseries: "R.7. Special Research Projects: Gateway Transitional Families Program." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.8. Special Research Projects: North Carolina Communities: Montagnard Refugees from Vietnam.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.9. Special Research Projects: Contemporary Funeral Traditions in the Gullah Community of St. Helena, S.C.

1 item.

Recordings by Michelle McCullers of interviews with members of the Gullah community on St. Helena, S.C., and of funeral services there.

RESTRICTION: Recordings of Jack Johnson and William Marshel may not be quoted or cited.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Contemporary Funeral Traditions in the Gullah Community of St. Helena, S.C. #04007, Subseries: "R.9. Special Research Projects: Contemporary Funeral Traditions in the Gullah Community of St. Helena, S.C." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.10. Special Research Projects: Carol Woods Retirement Community, Chapel Hill, N.C.

43 items.

Situated on 120 wooded acres in Chapel Hill, N.C., Carol Woods is an accredited, not-for-profit continuing care retirement community where residents live in cottages or apartments. Carol Woods opened its doors to its first residents in July 1979, with a second group of residents moving in November. These interviews with residents and staff members of the Carol Woods Retirement Community document the founding and early history of Carol Woods. The interviews were conducted by members of the Ad hoc Committee on the Early History of Carol Woods of the Carol Woods Residents Association. This committee was appointed to develop a history of the community on the occasion of its twentieth anniversary. Based on the interviews, Iris Friederich wrote Pioneering at Carol Woods . Included are interviews with residents Carey Bostian and Sandy McClamroch.

A copy of Pioneering at Carol Woods and a packet of information about the community are also filed here.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Carol Woods Retirement Community, Chapel Hill, N.C. #04007, Subseries: "R.10. Special Research Projects: Carol Woods Retirement Community, Chapel Hill, N.C." Interviews

Folder R1-R2

Carol Woods Retirement Community #04007, Subseries: "R.10. Special Research Projects: Carol Woods Retirement Community, Chapel Hill, N.C." Folder R1-R2

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.11. Special Research Projects: Life Review (1997).

31 items.

Interviews conducted by students in an oral history course taught by Alicia Rouverol at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the fall of 1997. Included are interviews with a history professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, with a Japanese immigrant to North Carolina, with a paramedical technologist at Lincoln Hospital in Durham, N.C., and other North Carolina residents.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Life Review (1997) #04007, Subseries: "R.11. Special Research Projects: Life Review (1997)." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.12. Special Research Projects: Life Review (2000).

15 items.

Interviews conducted by students in an oral history course taught by Alicia Rouverol at Duke University in the fall of 2000. This diverse collection includes interviews with German immigrants, recovering drug addicts, and individuals struggling with long-term illness, such as HIV.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Life Review (2000) #04007, Subseries: "R.12. Special Research Projects: Life Review (2000)." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.13. Special Research Projects: Middle Eastern Immigrants in North Carolina.

11 items.

Interviews conducted by students at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in History 77, The Modern Middle East, and History 195, Women in the Middle East, with immigrants from the Middle East about what it was like to live in the United States, and what it meant to be from the Middle East, especially after 11 September 2001.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Middle Eastern Immigrants in North Carolina #04007, Subseries: "R.13. Special Research Projects: Middle Eastern Immigrants in North Carolina." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.14. Special Research Projects: African American Converts to the Mormon Faith.

13 items.

Interviews conducted by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill religious studies major Barbara Copeland as a part of her senior research project. The oral histories explore the reasons why African American interviewees converted to the Mormon faith.

Interviews are accompanied by the undergraduate honors thesis Struggling with the Mormon Ideal: African-American Women in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by interviewer Barbara Copeland.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: African American Converts to the Mormon Faith #04007, Subseries: "R.14. Special Research Projects: African American Converts to the Mormon Faith." Interviews

Folder R15

Struggling with the Mormon Ideal: African-American Women in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints #04007, Subseries: "R.14. Special Research Projects: African American Converts to the Mormon Faith." Folder R15

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.15. Special Research Projects: New Hope Community.

2 items.

Interviews conducted by Kieran Taylor about the history of and community life in the New Hope community in Orange County, N.C., near Chapel Hill. Interviews discuss Blackwood and Strayhorn family history, history of the Blackwood farm, truck farming, farm life, the church community, and education, among other topics. Nannie Blackwood also describes her work as a nurse at Watts Hospital in Durham, N.C.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: New Hope Community #04007, Subseries: "R.15. Special Research Projects: New Hope Community." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.16. Special Research Projects: Remembering Black Main Streets.

30 items.

Interviews with residents, chiefly African American business owners, of Savannah, Ga., Greensboro, N.C., and Jacksonville, Fla., about changes in southern black businesses in the wake of urban renewal and desegregation.

Folders R-iii through R-vi contain background information about Savannah and Greensboro.

The interviews about Savannah have also been deposited at the Asa H. Gordon Library, Savannah State University. The interviews about Greensboro have also been deposited at the North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University Library in Greensboro, N.C. Interviews about Jacksonville have been deposited at LaVilla Museum in Jacksonville, Fla.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Remembering Black Main Streets #04007, Subseries: "R.16. Special Research Projects: Remembering Black Main Streets." Interviews

Folder R3-R4

Savannah, Ga. #04007, Subseries: "R.16. Special Research Projects: Remembering Black Main Streets." Folder R3-R4

Folder R5-R6

Greensboro, N.C. #04007, Subseries: "R.16. Special Research Projects: Remembering Black Main Streets." Folder R5-R6

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.17. Special Research Projects: Tobacco Interviews, Duke Homestead Education and History.

7 items.

Six interviews conducted for the Duke Homestead Education and History Corporation on the culture and history of tobacco auctioneering. Also included is an interview with Fred Bond, former mayor of Cary, N.C., and long-time head of the Flue-Cured Tobacco Cooperative Stabilization Corporation.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Tobacco Interviews, Duke Homestead Education and History #04007, Subseries: "R.17. Special Research Projects: Tobacco Interviews, Duke Homestead Education and History." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.18. Special Research Projects: Bruce Hartford.

1 item.

Interview with Bruce Hartford, a veteran civil rights movement activist in Alabama, who became involved in the peace movement in Southeast Asia and the labor and communist movements in the San Francisco Bay Area in the late 1960s and 1970s.

A copy of this interview has been deposited with the Bruce Hartford collection at the State Historical Society of Wisconsin in Madison. The interviewer conducted another interview with Hartford for the Martin Luther King, Jr., Papers Project at Stanford University. An additional interview with Hartford is available at http://www.crmvet.org/.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Bruce Hartford #04007, Subseries: "R.18. Special Research Projects: Bruce Hartford." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.19. Special Research Projects: Matzoh Ball Gumbo: Culinary Tales of the Jewish South, 1998-2001.

105 items.

Interviews with Jews living in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, New York, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, Washington, D.C., and Wisconsin. The intersection of Jewish faith, family, and food in the South are discussed. Many of the interviews were produced in association with the Institute of Southern Jewish Life and the Museum of the Southern Jewish Experience in Jackson, Miss. All interviews were conducted by Marcie Cohen Ferris in 1998-2002.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Matzoh Ball Gumbo: Culinary Tales of the Jewish South, 1998-2001 #04007, Subseries: "R.19. Special Research Projects: Matzoh Ball Gumbo: Culinary Tales of the Jewish South, 1998-2001." Interviews

Folder R7

Fendler, Oscar: "Chronicles," volume 2 #04007, Subseries: "R.19. Special Research Projects: Matzoh Ball Gumbo: Culinary Tales of the Jewish South, 1998-2001." Folder R7

Folder R8

Field notes: Atlanta, Ga. #04007, Subseries: "R.19. Special Research Projects: Matzoh Ball Gumbo: Culinary Tales of the Jewish South, 1998-2001." Folder R8

CLOSED until 1 January 2045

Folder R9

Field notes: Savannah, Ga. #04007, Subseries: "R.19. Special Research Projects: Matzoh Ball Gumbo: Culinary Tales of the Jewish South, 1998-2001." Folder R9

CLOSED until 1 January 2045

Folder R10

Field notes: New Orleans, La. #04007, Subseries: "R.19. Special Research Projects: Matzoh Ball Gumbo: Culinary Tales of the Jewish South, 1998-2001." Folder R10

CLOSED until 1 January 2045

Folder R11

Field notes: Jackson, Miss., and Vicksburg, Miss. #04007, Subseries: "R.19. Special Research Projects: Matzoh Ball Gumbo: Culinary Tales of the Jewish South, 1998-2001." Folder R11

CLOSED until 1 January 2045

Folder R12

Field notes: Charleston, S.C. #04007, Subseries: "R.19. Special Research Projects: Matzoh Ball Gumbo: Culinary Tales of the Jewish South, 1998-2001." Folder R12

CLOSED until 1 January 2045

Folder R13

Field notes: Memphis, Tenn. #04007, Subseries: "R.19. Special Research Projects: Matzoh Ball Gumbo: Culinary Tales of the Jewish South, 1998-2001." Folder R13

CLOSED until 1 January 2045

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.20. Special Research Projects: WakeMed History Project.

21 items.

Interviews, conducted by corporate historian Kathleen Kearns, detail the history of the WakeMed Hospital System of Raleigh, N.C., from its initial planning stages in 1955 to 2004. Interviewees are key figures in the hospital's history. They include members and former members of the medical and nursing staffs, former members of the board of directors, current and past administrative staff members, the hospital's former attorney, the widow of the founding chief executive officer, the former head of Rex Hospital, the former editor of the Raleigh News & Observer , and WakeMed's second chief executive officer. Topics include the history of medical care in Wake County, competition among area hospitals, recollections of local hospitals and administrators, media coverage, racial discrimination in medical care, and the hospital's transition to nonprofit status.

Three additional interviews are held by WakeMed in Raleigh, N.C.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: WakeMed History Project #04007, Subseries: "R.20. Special Research Projects: WakeMed History Project." Interviews

Folder R14

Detailed description of project written by Kathleen Kearns. #04007, Subseries: "R.20. Special Research Projects: WakeMed History Project." Folder R14

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.21. Special Research Projects: Shattering the Glass: The Remarkable History of Women's Basketball.

7 items.

This collection of interviews was conducted by Pamela Grundy and Susan Shackelford as part of their research for a book on the history of women's basketball in the United States, Shattering the Glass: The Remarkable History of Women's Basketball (The New Press, 2005). Interviewees include players, coaches, and administrators speaking about the game's early development and providing a view of the game on and off the court.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Shattering the Glass: The Remarkable History of Women's Basketball #04007, Subseries: "R.21. Special Research Projects: Shattering the Glass: The Remarkable History of Women's Basketball." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.22. Special Research Projects: Julian Bond.

1 item.

This project consists of two oral histories with civil rights leader Julian Bond by Elizabeth Gritter in November 1999. Gritter, later a Ph.D. student at UNC Chapel Hill, conducted these oral histories for a class project while an undergraduate at American University. The interviews trace Bond's life as an activist, from his childhood experiences with racism and exposure to civil rights to his tenure at the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) to his election to the Georgia legislature and finally to his protests against apartheid in South Africa. The interviews are accompanied by Gritter's class paper on Bond, biographical sketches, and responses to follow-up questions from the interviews. Also included is a copy of Gritter's spring 2006 article in Southern Cultures, which is a profile of Bond drawn from her undergraduate paper and these oral histories.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Julian Bond #04007, Subseries: "R.22. Special Research Projects: Julian Bond." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.23. Special Research Projects: Lemuel Delany, Jr.

1 item.

This interview sketches the life of funeral director Lemuel Delany, Jr., and his reactions to the book Having Our Say, published by his aunts Sadie and Bessie Delany. In the interview, Delany talked about the achievements of his grandfather, the Reverend Henry Beard Delany, who led Saint Augustine's College in Raleigh, N.C., and became the first African-American Episcopal bishop despite having been born into slavery. Delany also discussed his frustration with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), based on his observation of its relationship to the black business community in Harlem, N.Y.

This interview was scheduled on the recommendation of the Olivia Raney History Branch Library in Raleigh, N.C. That library and the Saint Augustine's College Library hold copies of the interview.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Lemuel Delany, Jr. #04007, Subseries: "R.23. Special Research Projects: Lemuel Delany, Jr." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.24. Special Research Projects: Tom Davenport

1 item.

Interview with independent and documentary filmmaker Tom Davenport at his home in Delaplane, Va. The interview focuses on four films produced in conjunction with the Curriculum in Folklore at UNC Chapel Hill that form part of Davenport's American Traditional Culture Series: The Shakers (1974), a historical overview of the growth and demise of the Society of the United Brethren of Believers in the last two remaining Shaker communities, Canterbury, N.H., and Sabbathday Lake, Me., recounted primarily through the reminiscences of several surviving Shaker sisters; Born for Hard Luck, a portrait of aging minstrel and medicine-show performer Arthur Jackson (Peg Leg Sam); Being a Joines, a look at life in a Blue Ridge Mountain community through the tall tales, comic local anecdotes, and religious narratives of John E. Joines; and A Singing Stream, a chronicle of four generations of the Landis family, members of the famous Golden Echos black gospel music group from rural Creedmoor, N.C. The interview discusses the troubles and trials of producing, editing, and releasing each documentary. It also includes discussion of the interaction among Davenport, Daniel W. Patterson (former chair of the Curriculum in Folklore), and Allen Tullos (former student at UNC Chapel Hill, who worked on all four films) as they struggled to capture their subjects not only through narrative and storytelling, but also through the prevailing traditions of song, dance, and religious belief. The interview is accompanied by five photographs of the filmmakers at work. There is also a brief discussion of the film Thoughts on Fox Hunting.

The interview is accompanied by five photographs of the filmmakers at work.

Related materials include:

  • Folkstreams.net Collection (#20384), Southern Folklife Collection

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Tom Davenport #04007, Subseries: "R.24. Special Research Projects: Tom Davenport" Interviews

Image P-4007/R347a

Tom Davenport in front of his editing bench in Delaplane, Va., 20 July 1995 #04007, Subseries: "R.24. Special Research Projects: Tom Davenport" P-4007/R347a

Image P-4007/R347b

Tom Davenport's editing suite in Delaplane, Va., 20 July 1995 #04007, Subseries: "R.24. Special Research Projects: Tom Davenport" P-4007/R347b

Image P-4007/R347c

Matt (last name unknown), Tom Davenport's film editing assistant, 19 July 1995 #04007, Subseries: "R.24. Special Research Projects: Tom Davenport" P-4007/R347c

Image P-4007/R347d

Tom Davenport's film and audiotape storage area in his workshop in Delaplane, Va., 20 July 1995 #04007, Subseries: "R.24. Special Research Projects: Tom Davenport" P-4007/R347d

Image P-4007/R347e

Tom Davenport's film and audiotape storage area in his workshop in Delaplane, Va., with editing assistant Matt (last name unknown), 20 July 1995 #04007, Subseries: "R.24. Special Research Projects: Tom Davenport" P-4007/R347e

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.25. Special Research Projects: The Women's Movement and North Carolina Churches.

12 items.

These interviews were conducted between 1999 and 2003 by various members of the North Carolina Council of Churches Task Group on the Impact of the Women's Movement on North Carolina Congregations. Created in primarily small group settings, they were subsequently adapted into a stage presentation titled The Woman's Coffeehouse of Spirit: The Changing Role of Women in North Carolina Protestant, Catholic, and Jewish Congregations Over the Last Forty Years. This stage presentation features characters representing ten religious faiths: African Methodist Episcopal, Baptist, Roman Catholic, Episcopalian, Jewish, Lutheran, United Methodist, Moravian, Presbyterian, and Quaker. Interviewers included Bett Hargrave, Jeanette Stokes, Evelyn Mattern, Judith Dancy, Lehoma Goode, Deborah Houser, Lois MacGillivray, Laura Kaplan, and Amelia Stinson-Wesley.

Audio recordings of all interviews are available, but interviewers and interviewees are not always identified.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: The Women's Movement and North Carolina Churches #04007, Subseries: "R.25. Special Research Projects: The Women's Movement and North Carolina Churches." Interviews

Folder R16

The Women's Coffeehouse of Spirit: The Changing Role of Women in North Carolina Protestant, Catholic, and Jewish Congregations over the Last Forty Years : A Readers Theatre Presentation. Compiled by Evelyn Mattern, S.F.C.C., North Carolina Council of Churches. #04007, Subseries: "R.25. Special Research Projects: The Women's Movement and North Carolina Churches." Folder R16

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.26. Special Research Projects: Northside Community Association, Chapel Hill, N.C.

15 items.

This group of interviews conducted by Susan Simone explores the lives and struggles of members of the Northside community, a historically African American and primarily residential neighborhood located immediately northwest of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and downtown Chapel Hill, N.C. The project was initiated as part of a community effort to preserve family homes and long-term connections among people living in Northside. Four of the interviews are with Marian Jackson, a longtime Chapel Hill resident.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Northside Community Association, Chapel Hill, N.C. #04007, Subseries: "R.26. Special Research Projects: Northside Community Association, Chapel Hill, N.C." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.27. Special Research Projects: Archie Green Interviews.

4 items.

These interviews include more than 20 hours of interview material with the folklorist, teacher, lobbyist, and activist Archie Green. The first series of interviews was conducted by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill English professor Robert Cantwell in 1985. Kieran Taylor of the Southern Oral History Program conducted the second series of interviews, which were edited for publication as "Shipwrights and Salmonbellies: How Archie Green Discovered Laborlore" (Labor: Studies in Working-Class History of the Americas, Volume 4, Number 3, Fall 2007). While both interviews are rich in biographical detail, the Cantwell interviews place emphasis on Green's work as a folklorist and lobbyist, while the Taylor interviews emphasize Green's labor-related activities. The final section of the Cantwell series includes an address Archie Green delivered at the close of the University of Chicago folk festival in 1973.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Archie Green Interviews #04007, Subseries: "R.27. Special Research Projects: Archie Green Interviews." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.28. Special Research Projects: Military Dissenters: Veterans, Military Families, and the Iraq and Afghan Wars.

27 items.

In 2005-2006, Betsy Brinson began a project to preserve the stories of soldiers and their families who were opposed to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Brinson, a member of the board of Quaker House in Fayetteville, N.C., located near Fort Bragg, the home of the 82nd Airborne Division, recognized the stories of these men and women were critical additions to the historical record. As the project evolved, Catherine Lutz of Brown University collaborated with Brinson.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Military Dissenters: Veterans, Military Families, and the Iraq and Afghan Wars #04007, Subseries: "R.28. Special Research Projects: Military Dissenters: Veterans, Military Families, and the Iraq and Afghan Wars." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.29. Special Research Projects: Providence Cooperative Farm.

8 items.

These interviews were conducted in conjunction with a 1998 master's thesis by Kieran W. Taylor, a graduate student at the University of Mississippi in the Department of Southern Studies. The interviews were intended to explore the legacies of the Providence Cooperative Farm, an experiment in biracial and cooperative living in Holmes County, Miss., that began in the late 1930s and continued to 1955 when several of its white leaders were driven from the farm. While not all of the interviewees were able to provide first-hand descriptions of the activities at Providence, many of them offer rich detail regarding African American life in rural Mississippi from the 1920s through the 1980s. The interviews with Henry Clark, the son of slaves, and James Walden offer especially vivid descriptions of farm life, folk medicine and beliefs, and race relations. Researchers should note that these interviews complement the Delta and Providence Farm Papers (#3474) at the Southern Historical Collection.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Providence Cooperative Farm #04007, Subseries: "R.29. Special Research Projects: Providence Cooperative Farm." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.30. Special Research Projects: Oral History and the Study of the Modern South.

7 items.

This series contains interviews conducted by students under the direction of Dr. Jacquelyn Hall during the Spring 2008 semester at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Topics bear on the history of the American South and are related to themes emphasized by the Southern Oral History Program. The themes include immigrant experiences in the Chapel Hill area, art education in public schools, and needleworkers. Please see Series U.13 for interviews from Dr. Hall's Spring 2008 course that pertain to "The Long Civil Rights Movement."

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Oral History and the Study of the Modern South #04007, Subseries: "R.30. Special Research Projects: Oral History and the Study of the Modern South." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.31. Special Research Projects: Raleigh News and Observer.

33 items.

In January 2007, the SOHP launched an examination of the impact and influence of the News and Observer of Raleigh between 1945 and 1995. As North Carolina assumed its modern form, the News and Observer covered politics, the operations of state government and public-policy debate, serving readers across the state and region. In 1995, after 101 years of Daniels family ownership, the paper was sold to the McClatchy Company, the nation's largest publisher of daily newspapers. The SOHP's Beth Millwood and Joseph Mosnier conducted interviews with former governors and key legislative leaders; longtime News and Observer management figures, editors, and reporters; Daniels family members; and industry observers. Many of the interviewees were alumni of the School of Journalism at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Topics include civil rights; discrimination in employment; segregation and integration of schools; national, state, and local politics; Jesse Helms; journalists and journalism; the McClatchy organization; and many issues relating to the running of a newspaper. The News and Observer project is supported by a grant from the Josephus Daniels Charitable Fund of the Triangle Community Foundation.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Raleigh News and Observer #04007, Subseries: "R.31. Special Research Projects: Raleigh News and Observer." Interviews

Folder R31a

News and Observer history. #04007, Subseries: "R.31. Special Research Projects: Raleigh News and Observer." Folder R31a

Folder R31b

Information on interviews R-0404 through R-0414 #04007, Subseries: "R.31. Special Research Projects: Raleigh News and Observer." Folder R31b

Folder R31c

Information on interviews R-0415 through R-0429 #04007, Subseries: "R.31. Special Research Projects: Raleigh News and Observer." Folder R31c

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.32. Special Research Projects: Carrboro Farmers' Market Project.

7 items.

These interviews were completed as part of photographer Sonia Katchian's Carrboro Farmers' Market Photography Project in 1995. All seven of the interviews are with farmers who participated in the Carrboro Farmers' Market, most of whom had been involved in the market since or near the beginning of its existence. The interviews and photographs were completed between January and March of 1995 and culminated in an exhibition at the ArtsCenter in Carrboro, 10 April 10 to 9 May 1995. There was also was a Farmers' Speakout on 23 April 1995, which is included in the collection on VHS (VT-4007/20). Other supplemental materials include about 45 copies of photographs (originals at the Smithsonian Institution) of the farmers interviewed and other farmers involved the Carrboro Farmers' Market Photography Project; 20 photographic slides; two gallery guides to the exhibition; and five VHS tapes.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Carrboro Farmers' Market Project #04007, Subseries: "R.32. Special Research Projects: Carrboro Farmers' Market Project." Interviews

Folder R32a-R32ay

Photographs; gallery guides; and slides #04007, Subseries: "R.32. Special Research Projects: Carrboro Farmers' Market Project." Folder R32a-R32ay

Videotape VT-4007/18-22

VT-4007/18

VT-4007/19

VT-4007/20

VT-4007/21

VT-4007/22

Five video tapes, including "Speak Out 1995" #04007, Subseries: "R.32. Special Research Projects: Carrboro Farmers' Market Project." VT-4007/18-22

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.33. Special Research Projects: Documenting the Gulf Oil Spill.

7 items.

These interviews, completed while oil was still flooding into the Gulf of Mexico from the ruptured deepwater well, reveal the worry, hope, confusion, and commitment of Louisiana coastal residents during a time of deep uncertainty and peril. Interviewees put their current predicament in historical context, describing their lives and livelihoods connected, often for generations, to the coast and to the water.

Topics include interviewees' evolving understanding of government, regulation, and industry; the coexistence of oil and fishing industries; and the importance of work, family, and place. Interviewees compare the oil spill to earlier challenges, such as hurricanes, and describe how this time seemed different: more daunting, less certain, and more out of control. They express frustration with much of what was happening, and, at the same time, confidence in the perseverance and intelligence of local people to get through the crisis.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Documenting the Gulf Oil Spill #04007, Subseries: "R.33. Special Research Projects: Documenting the Gulf Oil Spill." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.34. Special Research Projects: New Roots.

98 items.

These interviews focus on issues related to Latin American immigration to North Carolina and the formation of Latino communities. They were conducted by students in courses taught by Hannah Gill at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill relating to the topic during the Spring 2011, Spring 2012, and Spring 2013 semesters. Interviewees include immigrants, United States-born second generations, professionals who work with immigrants, policy-makers, religious leaders, educators, students, and local business owners.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: New Roots #04007, Subseries: "R.34. Special Research Projects: New Roots." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.35. Special Research Projects: Louanne Watley.

5 items.

These conversations with "Betty" or "Evelyn" were compiled for photographer Louanne Watley's series using the same names. They constitute more general field recordings of Watley's time with her subjects than formal interviews and consist of five tracks wherein speakers compare and describe Watley's photographs; discuss trees, memories of family and pets, and day-to-day life; and go to a grocery store and a liquor store where they engage with occasional passersby and compare brands and prices of items.

Watley's photographs relating to these audio recordings are held in the North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Louanne Watley #04007, Subseries: "R.35. Special Research Projects: Louanne Watley." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.36. Special Research Projects: Johnson Intern Program.

4 items.

These interviews, conducted by participants in the Johnson Intern Program, an eleven-month service program dedicated to social justice through faith, relate to a community service project about faith communities' involvement in the civil rights era in Chapel Hill, N.C.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Johnson Intern Program #04007, Subseries: "R.36. Special Research Projects: Johnson Intern Program." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.37. Special Research Projects: Oral History Research by Pete Daniel.

44 items.

These interviews were conducted, 1975-2007, by Pete Daniel, retired curator at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History and past president of the Organization of American Historians, as part of his research on the 20th-century history of the American South. Some of these interviews have been used in his books, including Toxic Drift: Pesticides and Health in the Post-World War II South, Lost Revolutions: The South in the 1950s, Breaking the Land: The Transformation of Cotton, Tobacco, and Rice Cultures since 1880, and Deep'n as It Come: The 1927 Mississippi River Flood, as well as other research projects about African American farmers and the Little Rock Nine at Central High in 1957.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Oral History Research by Pete Daniel #04007, Subseries: "R.37. Special Research Projects: Oral History Research by Pete Daniel." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.38. Special Research Projects: Institute for Southern Studies.

36 items.

Sue Thrasher, co-founder of the Institute for Southern Studies, donated these interviews to the Southern Oral History Program. The Institute for Southern Studies was founded in 1970 by civil rights activists to provide resources for grassroots and community activists, scholars, and policy makers in the South. Throughout the 1970s, the Institute's staff conducted oral history interviews with labor and civil rights activists who had been involved in various struggles in the 1910s through the 1940s. They interviewed members of the Southern Tenant Farmers Union, organizers of the Gastonia Textile Strike (1929), participants in the Llano Cooperative Colony in Louisiana, members of the United Auto Workers who participated in a 1936 sit-down strike, Black Liberation theologians, organizers for the United Furniture Workers, and others involved in civil rights and labor organizing. Many of the interviews were edited and appeared in the Institute for Southern Studies' publication Southern Exposure.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Institute for Southern Studies #04007, Subseries: "R.38. Special Research Projects: Institute for Southern Studies." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.39. Special Research Projects: Legacy of William Friday.

22 items.

These interviews focus on individuals who built on the legacy of Bill Friday in their organizations and efforts to confront poverty in North Carolina. In addition to documenting a variety of issue-oriented approaches to poverty (such as literacy, education, housing, and economic development), these interviews explore a range of approaches to affecting social change, including direct service, policy advocacy, community organizing, community development, collaborative community change, and electoral politics.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Legacy of William Friday #04007, Subseries: "R.39. Special Research Projects: Legacy of William Friday." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.40. Special Research Projects: Work and Cook and Eat: Lumbee Foodways of Robeson County, N.C.

5 items.

Interviews, conducted in 2014 by Sara Wood in Robeson County, N.C., as part of a project called "Lumbee Indians of NC: Work and Cook and Eat" with the Southern Foodways Alliance. The interviews focus on Lumbee men and women who work in or are affiliated with foodways in North Carolina. They reveal Lumbee identity through traditions, stories, experiences, and food. As interviewees recount the beginnings, daily operations, and ends of their own businesses, they touch on the ways in which food affects family and community within the Lumbee culture.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Work and Cook and Eat: Lumbee Foodways of Robeson County, N.C. #04007, Subseries: "R.40. Special Research Projects: Work and Cook and Eat: Lumbee Foodways of Robeson County, N.C." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.41. Special Research Projects: Tobe: Visions of Childhood, Race, and Rural Life in Children's Literature.

17 items.

Benjamin Filene Director of Public History and associate professor of history at UNC Greensboro donated these interviews, conducted between 2011 and 2014. They were research tools in his effort to do a microhistory of a single children's book Tobe, which was published by UNC Press in 1939. Illustrated with dozens of black-and-white photographs, Tobe was one of the first children's books to feature depictions of everyday African Americans.

Filene saw the book and the story behind it as a way to open up rich issues in twentieth-century cultural and social history: the complexities of race and representation, visions of childhood, the history of juvenile literature, and the lived experience of rural life in the pre-civil rights South. Filene identifed the people in the photos (primarily the Garner, Herbin, Goins, and Shoffner families, who lived in the African American community of Goshen, now part of Greensboro, N.C.), the family on whom the story was based (the McCauleys, who lived in rural Orange County, N.C.), the author (Hillsborough, N.C., schoolteacher Stella Sharpe), and the photographer (Charles Farrell of Greensboro). Nearly seventy-five years after the book's publication, Filene conducted more than twenty interviews with people involved in the book (or the communities it depicts) and their descendants. These interviews were central to Filene's efforts to understand the book's history and its place in personal and public memory.

Filene shared his findings in an exhibition in the North Carolina Collection Gallery, Where is Tobe? Unfolding Stories of Race, Childhood, and Rural Life (October 2014-March 2015). That exhibition drew on the holdings of UNC's North Carolina Collection, which include prints and negatives of the book's original photos and nearly 200 alternate photographs, and of the Southern Historical Collection, which include correspondence between UNC Press and the photographer and author.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Tobe: Visions of Childhood, Race, and Rural Life in Children's Literature #04007, Subseries: "R.41. Special Research Projects: Tobe: Visions of Childhood, Race, and Rural Life in Children's Literature." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.43. Special Research Projects: NewStories

items.

NewStories, begun in 2012, is an ongoing project of the UNC School of Media and Journalism. Interviews are conducted by students enrolled in media history coursework under the direction of Dr. Barbara Friedman. The series explores the life experiences of North Carolina media workers, whose career fields include print and broadcast news, photojournalism, web journalism, public relations, marketing, advertising and education. Included is a series of interviews with inductees of the North Carolina Halls of Fame. The interviews are biographical in nature, yet some concentrate on particular events or periods within the lifetime of the respondent.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: NewStories #04007, Subseries: "R.43. Special Research Projects: NewStories" Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.44. Special Research Projects: Carolina Cooks, Carolina Eats

21 items.

Carolina Cooks, Carolina Eats is a class and research project at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, beginning in Spring 2015, in the Department of American Studies under the direction of Marcie Cohen Ferris, Sharon Holland, and Elizabeth Engelhardt. This project thematically explores the history and contemporary politics of food in five regions of North Carolina: the coast, eastern Carolina, the Piedmont, western Carolina, and a thematic landscape: the state's borderlands. Students are collecting oral histories from each region, exploring diverse themes that range from: southern history and culture (food and historical issues of race, class, gender, ethnicity, and place), environmentalism and sustainability, public health and nutrition, activism, immigration, globalism, gender and sexuality, and justice.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Carolina Cooks, Carolina Eats #04007, Subseries: "R.44. Special Research Projects: Carolina Cooks, Carolina Eats" Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.45. Special Research Projects: Moral Mondays

items.

Interviews conducted in 2014 and 2015 document the Moral Mondays movement in North Carolina, which began in 2013, in response to legislative changes enacted by the North Carolina General Assembly. Interviews are from separate documentation efforts by Jonathan Michels and Bernetiae Reed, but the two interviewers did collaborate on several interviews. Michels, a freelance writer, conducted interviews in the spring and summer of 2014 with individuals who are active in the North Carolina political scene and played integral roles in the Moral Mondays protests. Many of these interviewees were arrested for their participation in the protests. Reed a master of library and information science student at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro conducted interviews from summer 2014 through spring 2015. Feeling that African American civil rights were being trampled by the legislature, Reed, a black woman, decided to join the Moral Mondays protests and was arrested during one of the demonstrations, prompting her to document the experience in oral histories.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Moral Mondays: Bernetiae Reed 2014-2015 #04007, Subseries: "R.45. Special Research Projects: Moral Mondays" Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse R.46. Special Research Projects: Tuscarora Artists

items.

Interviews with Tuscarora artists in Robeson County, N.C., were conducted by William Maxwell, a doctoral student in the Department of Geography at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Maxwell's doctoral research focuses on the wild-native-plants-based arts of the Tuscarora American Indian tribe of North Carolina. Maxwell conducted a series of interviews in the winter and spring of 2015 exploring how Tuscarora artists create works out of wild, local, native plants and how the plants and artworks contribute to the artists' understanding of themselves as part of their natural and cultural environment.

Interviews

Special Research Projects: Tuscarora Artists #04007, Subseries: "R.46. Special Research Projects: Tuscarora Artists" Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse S. Center for Creative Leadership.

36 items.

Interviews with the staff of the Center for Creative Leadership (CCL) were conducted in 1998 and 1999 for a project funded by CCL and coordinated by Joseph Mosnier. Founded in 1971 by L. Smith Richardson, Sr., in Greensboro, N.C., as a nonprofit institute devoted to the study, practice, and development of leadership, CCL has branches in Colorado Springs, Colo., San Diego, Calif., and Brussels, Belgium. Interviewees discussed their backgrounds, roles, and accomplishments within CCL and CCL's impact and institutional history. Excerpts from the interviews were published in January 2000 in a book titled Herding Cats: An Oral History of the Center for Creative Leadership.

Interviews

Center for Creative Leadership #04007, Series: "S. Center for Creative Leadership." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse U. The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s.

1000 items.

Under the leadership of Jacquelyn Dowd Hall, the Southern Oral History Program launched a major new initiative, "The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s." This project collects interviews with men and women who in the years following the sit-ins and protests of the 1960s fought to keep the doors of equal opportunity open and to extend the civil rights struggle into new arenas. The interviews for this project document activism in a wide range of communities across the South. Intensive field work sites include: Charlotte, N.C.; Charleston, S.C.; Birmingham, Ala.; and Louisville, Ky.

The interviewing for this project generally focuses on three main areas of civil rights activism: 1) Race and the Public Schools: In most southern communities, school desegregation did not reach significant levels until more than 15 years after the 1954 Brown vs. Board of Education decision. These interviews consider how the process of school integration--and more recent trends toward resegregation--have transformed southern communities. Many interviewees share memories of the segregated schools of the Jim Crow era and reflect on what was both gained and lost in the process of school integration. 2) Economic Justice: Even as the popular media in the 1970s and 1980s hailed the South as the nation's new hotspot of growth and opportunity, a broad range of activists drew attention to the limits of Sunbelt prosperity. This series captures the voices of those men and women by examining movements for affordable housing, residential integration, equal employment opportunity, labor organization, welfare rights, and environmental justice. An additional series of economic justice themed interviews looks at those who mobilized in the wake of Hurricane Katrina and confronted anew the region's enduring inequalities. 3) Gender and Sexuality: The South played critical, if contradictory, roles in shaping the women's movement and the gay liberation movement. It was during the South's black freedom movement of the 1960s that many second-wave feminists and gay rights activists first gained experience as grassroots organizers and extended the goals of freedom and equality to questions of gender and sexuality. Yet the South also earned a national reputation for its organized resistance to the Equal Rights Amendment and gay rights initiatives. These interviews look at second-wave feminism and gay rights activism in the South and how both movements were inflected by issues of race and class.

The Breaking New Ground project contains interviews with African American landowners and their descendants in the American South. Interviews focus on rural life during the Jim Crow era, the impact of federal and state farm policies, and the role of African American farmers in the social, political and economic life of the region.

The interviews in the "Long Civil Rights Movement" collection are organized according to both location and the chief area of civil rights activism discussed. Yet since the movements of the "Long Civil Rights Movement" often overlapped in time and leadership, users of the collection should be aware that many interviews speak broadly to the civil rights landscape of the post-1960s South.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse U.1. Individual Biographies.

34 items.

This collection of interviews contains oral history interviews unaffiliated with specific projects.

There is an interview with Philip E. Bazemore of Union County, N.C., regarding his charge against the state of North Carolina relating to discrimination against African American county extension agents. The interview also discusses the role of county agents; racial politics in Union County, N.C.; and Bazemore's career as a public official.

There is an interview with Abie Wilson, Director of the Williamsburg Arts Council in Kingstree, South Carolina. The main focus of the interview is the Southern Negro Youth Congress. Wilson also discusses growing up in South Carolina and his family history.

There is an interview with Benjamin Chavis Muhammad, long-time civil rights activist who has been active in the African American freedom struggle since the early 1960s. Chavis Muhammad discusses his family history, childhood protest activities, and student activism at Saint Augustine's College in Raleigh, N.C., and at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.

There are interviews with Anton Gunn, who discusses his role in Barack Obama's 2008 presidential campaign as well as his upbringing and family relationships in the South as a member of the "Hip-Hop Generation."

There is an interview with Elizabeth Durham, who discusses her upbringing in a Baltimore suburb and her work at the Westinghouse Defense Division at the beginning of the equal opportunity employment.

There are interviews with Alexander Evans and Leonard Giles, who discuss their role in a worker's strike at the sanitation department in Rocky Mount, N.C.

There is an interview with Gary Grant, who discusses the resettlement of African Americans to the newly created Tillery community in the 1930s and 1940s.

There is an interview with Lucy Lewis who discusses her civil rights activism in North Carolina and New York in the 1960s and 1970s.

There is an interview with Sara Evans, who discusses her experiences with civil rights as a community organizer, focusing on her time in Durham, N.C., and later in academia.

There is an interview with Si Kahn, who discusses his music and civil rights activism in the South, especially North Carolina, in the 1960s and 1970s.

Ferrel Guillory conducted a life history interview with Jack Bass, journalist, scholar, and writer on racial justice and southern politics. This interview contains details about his childhood; his journalism career; entrance into politics and campaign for Congress; and his books on the judicial system in the South, civil rights, and southern politicians. This interview also contains Bass's reflections on his postgraduate education and teaching career, as well as the ways in which South Carolina shaped his life.

Twenty interviews in this series were conducted during the Spring 2012 semester of Dr. Jacquelyn Hall's Introduction to Oral History seminar at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Topics bear on the history of the American South and are related to different aspects and perspectives of the Long Civil Rights Movement.

Interviews

The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s: Individual Biographies #04007, Subseries: "U.1. Individual Biographies." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse U.2. School Desegregation in Robeson County, N.C.

17 items.

Interviews focusing on the process and challenges of tri-racial school desegregation in Robeson County, N.C. Interviewees discuss the internal political dynamics of the Lumbee and Tuscarora Indians of Robeson County, as well as black and white, white and Indian, and black and Indian race relations. While these interviews focus broadly on school desegregation, they also range over multiple facets of the civil rights movement in Robeson County, 1954-1988. The mechanics of segregation and desegregation, interviewees' experiences in a tri-racial community, and present-day attitudes are discussed.

Interviews

The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s: School Desegregation in Robeson County, N.C. #04007, Subseries: "U.2. School Desegregation in Robeson County, N.C." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse U.3. School Desegregation in Birmingham, Ala.

33 items.

Interviews focusing on daily life in Birmingham, Ala., schools in the late 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s, with an emphasis on the first years of student and faculty desegregation in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Interviewees include students, administrators, onlookers, and a civil rights attorney, but most are with former teachers within the Birmingham Public School System. Experiences in elementary and high schools are examined, and some interviews give a broad perspective on school desegregation and the scope of Birmingham history in this period generally. Interviewers include Willoughby Anderson, Kimberly Hill, Timothy McCarthy, and Joseph Mosnier.

Interviews

The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s: School Desegregation in Birmingham, Ala. #04007, Subseries: "U.3. School Desegregation in Birmingham, Ala." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse U.4. School Desegregation in Louisville, Ky.

41 items.

These oral histories, conducted by David P. Cline, Elizabeth Gritter, Timothy P. McCarthy, and Joseph Mosnier examine school desegregation in Louisville, Ky., with a focus on the impact of court-ordered busing beginning in the fall of 1975. At that time, Louisville also merged its city and county school systems; local law required this action because the city school system had gone bankrupt. Though Louisville was famous in 1956 for its peaceful, "successful" integration of the city schools, the schools had re-segregated. The advent of busing sparked widespread violence and opposition, and countless articles at the time compared the city to Boston, Mass. These oral histories are largely of administrators, teachers, and students who experienced busing, but also include such other figures as pro-busing activists and a national guardsman who rode the buses with the students. Each interview subject describes his or her assessment of busing. The interviews also cover a range of other topics, including segregated Louisville, school desegregation efforts in 1956, connections between social movements, and the impact of class on education.

The interviews are accompanied by an article, the SOHP fall 2004 final report, and school desegregation interview protocol questions for teachers, administrators, and and students, located in folder U.4a.

Interviews

The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s: School Desegregation in Louisville, Ky. #04007, Subseries: "U.4. School Desegregation in Louisville, Ky." Interviews

Folder U4a

School Desegregation in Louisville, Ky.: supplemental materials #04007, Subseries: "U.4. School Desegregation in Louisville, Ky." Folder U4a

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse U.5. Memphis Civil Rights and Politics.

27 items.

Interviews focusing on politics and the civil rights movement in Memphis, Tenn., in the 1950s and 1960s. More broadly, these interviews cover the national civil rights movement, Memphis from the Edward H. Crump era until 2004, and southern and national politics. Topics include black electoral mobilization, the sit-in movement, the John F. Kennedy administration, local civil rights leaders and grassroots organizers, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People nationally and locally, and women's political involvement. Interview subjects range from white male political leaders to black female grassroots activists, from a lawyer who defended the city against the NAACP lawsuits to the NAACP lawyers who carried them out. Interviews were recorded by Elizabeth Gritter, a doctoral student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, who used them for her master's thesis.

Interview U-70 was recorded by Elizabeth Gritter with the assistance of Memphis resident Calvin Turley. Gritter used these interviews in her master's thesis at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, titled "'This Is a Crusade for Freedom': The Volunteer Ticket Campaign in the 1959 City Election in Memphis, Tennesee" (2005). Copies of these interviews are also available at the Memphis/Shelby County Public Library and Information Center.

CLOSED: Interviews are CLOSED until 2019.

Interviews

The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s: Memphis Civil Rights and Politics #04007, Subseries: "U.5. Memphis Civil Rights and Politics." Interviews

Folder U1

Resume of interviewer Elizabeth Gritter #04007, Subseries: "U.5. Memphis Civil Rights and Politics." Folder U1

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse U.6. Remembering Bombingham, Remaking Birmingham.

7 items.

Interviews are part of research by Willoughby Anderson on the legacy of the civil rights movement in Birmingham, Ala. Interviewees include community leaders, attorneys connected with the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing trials, individuals involved in municipal government, and other citizens of Birmingham. The interviews are in general life history format and focus on school desegregation, the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing, the 1977 Chambliss trial (Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing trial), the 1979 election of Richard Arrington, the creation of the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute in 1992, ongoing race relations in the city, and the 2000 and 2001 Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing trials.

Interviews

The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s: Remembering "Bombingham," Remaking Birmingham #04007, Subseries: "U.6. Remembering Bombingham, Remaking Birmingham." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse U.7. Economic Justice in Charlotte, N.C.

61 items.

These oral histories broadly explore economic justice in Charlotte, N.C., focusing on the period from the 1960s through the 1990s. They address labor activism, community activism, racial discrimination in employment, the civil rights movement, politics, law, and the struggle for access to affordable housing, all within the broader context of desegregated work environments and post-segregated Charlotte. Other topics include the health care field, increased educational opportunities for African Americans, and recent social and economic trends within Charlotte. Some cover the time period prior to the 1960s and give a picture of life during the Jim Crow era. The oral history of James Knox Polk Sr., an African American, takes a life history approach and includes a discussion of sports. The interviews with Sarah Coleman, Doretha Davis, Thereasea Elder, Dorothy Howell, Gerald Johnson, Thomas Moore, Beatrice Thompson, and Clara Williams examine corporate desegregation. Thompson and Williams, early entrants into the field of broadcast journalism and television shows, and Davis, who may have been the first African American saleswoman in a white establishment in Charlotte, uncover their memories of racial and gender discrimination. Thomas Moore assesses the impact of church integration in Charlotte.

Note that this is an ongoing project; more interviews will be added subsequently.

Interviews

The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s: Economic Justice in Charlotte, N.C. #04007, Subseries: "U.7. Economic Justice in Charlotte, N.C." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse U.8. Economic Justice in Louisville, Ky.

24 items.

The first 18 interviews, conducted by David P. Cline, focus on the Park Duvalle neighborhood over time and the impact of industrial pollution on Louisville's poorer communities. The Park Duvalle neighborhood, located on Louisville's west side, has long been home to a majority African American population; at one time the area was known as Little Africa. Urban renewal brought two large public housing projects to the area: the Southwick Homes and the Cotter & Lang Homes. The projects and the Park Duvalle neighborhood in general became known throughout the 1970s, 1980s, and into the 1990s as the locus of much of Louisville's crime and most of its drug traffic. The housing project was razed at the end of the 1990s and replaced with mixed-income public and private housing called the Villages at Park Duvalle. Park Duvalle was also the site of a War on Poverty-funded medical center and neighborhood center developed in 1969, both of which successfully operate today. Park Duvalle is one of several neighborhoods that bear the brunt of the airborne industrial pollution from the city's chemical and rubber plants, mostly located in the area known as Rubbertown. Each interview subject describes his or her impressions of the changing face of poverty and community involvement in the Park Duvalle neighborhood and the relationship of race to poverty and environmental pollution. The interviews cover not only those subjects but also a range of other topics, including segregated Louisville, school desegregation efforts, connections between social movements, and the ongoing struggle for complete civil rights. A second group of interviews, conducted by Sarah Thuesen, explores the work of economic justice activists in Louisville, Ky., since the 1960s. With one exception, the dominant theme is labor union activism in Louisville. As Louisville experienced industrial decline in the 1970s, the health care sector became an increasingly vital source of employment and labor activity. Several interviewees played leading roles in the locally based Nurses Professional Organization and its efforts to organize nurses in Louisville since the late 1980s; another interviewee organized for several unions. There is also an interview chiefly focused on housing and the women's movement. Other themes in many of these interviews include the black power movement, school desegregation, and the role of race in southern politics.

Interviews

The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s: Economic Justice in Louisville, Ky. #04007, Subseries: "U.8. Economic Justice in Louisville, Ky." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse U.9. Economic Justice in Birmingham, Ala.

22 items.

These interviews are part of the economic justice series, and the interviewees are activists, union organizers, lawyers, ministers, and long-term residents of Birmingham, Ala. Some interviewees discuss local poverty, neighborhood transition, and efforts to revitalize African American neighborhoods and defend workers' rights over the past 40 years; others discuss the evolution of labor union activism in Birmingham since the late 1960s and the recent emergence of an immigrant rights movement relating to Hispanic Americans in Birmingham.

Interviewers include David Cline, Elizabeth Gritter, Kimberly Hill, Aidan Smith, Sarah Thuesen, and Dwana Waugh.

Interviews

The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s: Economic Justice in Birmingham, Ala. #04007, Subseries: "U.9. Economic Justice in Birmingham, Ala." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse U.10. Hillside High School.

18 items.

These interviews were conducted by Gerrelyn Chunn Patterson as part of her research for her dissertation, Brown Can't Close Us Down: The Invincible Pride of Hillside High School (University of North Carolina, 2005). Patterson, who attended Hillside High School in Durham, N.C., 1972-1975, interviewed other Hillside alumni about the historically African-American high school during school desegregation. Interviewees represent alumni from the 1950s to the 1970s, some of them teachers at Hillside at the time of the interviews. The interview with Evalee Parker discusses the experience of a white student at the school in the 1970s.

Related materials include an interview with Richard Hicks, Principal, Hillside High School (interview M-23).

Interviews

The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s: Hillside High School #04007, Subseries: "U.10. Hillside High School." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse U.11. Gender and Sexuality.

29 items.

This series explores how the South played a critical yet contradictory role in shaping both the women's movement and the gay liberation movement. Many second-wave feminists and gay rights activists first gained experience as grassroots organizers in the South's African American freedom movement of the 1960s. The South earned a reputation for its adherence to traditional notions of womanhood and masculinity and for its organized resistance to the Equal Rights Amendment and gay rights initiatives. It was in that southern context that many activists began to extend the goals of freedom and equality to questions of gender and sexuality. This series contains 25 interviews conducted by students and interns under the direction of Dr. Sarah Thuesen during the Summer 2006 and Spring 2007 semesters at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The students chose a broad range of feminists and gay rights activists as interviewees. Most were residents of the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill area. Interviewees include one of the first women to integrate the United States Military Academy in 1976 and a male professor at the Academy who witnessed that change; two ministers of local churches affiliated with the Metropolitan Community Church, a predominantly gay denomination; several grassroots leaders within the local gay rights movement; participants in the women's health and reproductive rights movements of the 1970s; former employees of Ladyslipper Music in Durham; Karen Parker, the first female African American to receive an undergraduate degree at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; the co-founders of Mothers Against Jesse in Congress, which organized in the mid-1990s against the homophobic rhetoric of North Carolina Senator Jesse Helms; an advocate for women's collegiate athletics; activists with the Orange County (N.C.) Women's Center; members of the Triangle-area Common Woman Chorus; veterans of the Southern Folk Cultural Revival Project, including Alice Gerrard; advocates for women's involvement in politics, especially through the North Carolina Women's Political Caucus; local organizers for National Organization for Women; and local participants in the Equal Rights Amendment campaigns of the 1970s.

There are also four interviews conducted by students under the direction of Dr. Jacquelyn Hall during the Spring 2011 semester at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Interviews

The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s: Gender and Sexuality #04007, Subseries: "U.11. Gender and Sexuality." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse U.12. Imagining New Orleans.

49 items.

In May 2006, a team of researchers traveled to New Orleans, La., to initiate a project titled "Imagining New Orleans." The project team was led by Andrew Horowitz of the New Haven Oral History Project, with collaborators from the Southern Oral History Program, Yale University, and the Louisiana State Museum. The project aimed to use oral history to document the experiences of residents who returned to New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina to rebuild their homes, businesses, and lives and to explore patterns of racial, economic, and political inequality that have long persisted in the city. In four weeks, researchers interviewed nearly 50 residents who had returned to New Orleans as pioneers of the "rebuild and move forward" efforts. The interviews were featured in an exhibit at the Louisiana State Museum. The series also contains four interviews conducted by David Suitts, an undergraduate at UNC-Chapel Hill, in July 2006 with children at the Children of Faith Camp, Israelite Baptist Church, who witnessed Hurricane Katrina.

Interviews

The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s: Imagining New Orleans #04007, Subseries: "U.12. Imagining New Orleans." Interviews

Folder U2

Digital photographs and guide to digital photographs by disc, date, and location. #04007, Subseries: "U.12. Imagining New Orleans." Folder U2

Data Compact Disc DCD-4007/U7

Digital photographs of Javante Daigle, Irvinnisha Pollard, Joren Smith, and Christopher Turrner as well as a panoramic digital photograph of Israelite Baptist Church in Center City, New Orleans, La. #04007, Subseries: "U.12. Imagining New Orleans." DCD-4007/U7

Digital Video Disc DVD-4007/U7_1

Children of Faith Camp #04007, Subseries: "U.12. Imagining New Orleans." DVD-4007/U7_1

Depicts children and counselors at the Children of Faith Camp at Israelite Baptist Church in Center City, New Orleans, La., during the summer of 2006.

Folder U7

Interview notes and background for interviews U-0352, U-0355-U0357 #04007, Subseries: "U.12. Imagining New Orleans." Folder U7

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse U.13. Oral History and the Modern South.

60 items.

This series contains a group of 60 interviews conducted by students under the direction of Dr. Jacquelyn Hall during the Spring 2008 and Spring 2011 semesters at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Topics bear on the history of the American South and are related to themes emphasized by the Southern Oral History Program. These themes include, among many others, women's leadership from the 1920s to the present, second wave feminism, labor and working class history, the history of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, journalism, the legal profession, environmental issues, and southern politics. These class materials are related to the SOHP's "The Long Civil Rights Movement" initiative, which aims to expand the understanding of the civil rights movement far beyond the dramatic decade of mass protests against segregation, stressing the struggle that began in the 1930s and spawned a series of other social movements from the 1960s onward. Students chose a broad range of topics related to "The Long Civil Rights Movement" including, but are not limited to, post-secondary school desegregation; politics and race relations in Durham, N.C., and Winston-Salem, N.C.; medicine and medical education at Duke University, gender, and race; the sit-in movement in North Carolina; the gay, lesbian, and transgender community in North Carolina; race and gender in athletics; and Spanish-language media. Also included in this series are 25 interviews by Rob Lalka with individuals active in the Orleans Parish Public Schools reform effort. Please see Series R.30 for interviews from Dr. Hall's Spring 2008 course that do not pertain to "The Long Civil Rights Movement."

Interviews

The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s: Oral History and the Modern South #04007, Subseries: "U.13. Oral History and the Modern South." Interviews

Folder U3

670 Class Papers and Related Articles #04007, Subseries: "U.13. Oral History and the Modern South." Folder U3

Folder U4

Robert Lalka's 670 Class Materials #04007, Subseries: "U.13. Oral History and the Modern South." Folder U4

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse U.14. Preserving the African American Experience in Pamlico County, N.C.

19 items.

This series is an oral history and photography project that documented the history and heritage of Pamlico County, N.C., from 1930 to 1965. It includes oral histories with elderly citizens of Bayboro, Oriental, Florence, Arapahoe, Mesic, Maribel, and Grantsboro, N.C. Segregation is discussed in many of the interviews.

The project was funded by the North Carolina Humanities Council and the Neuse-Pamlico Sound Women's Coalition, Inc. Linda Henry served as project coordinator.

Interviews

The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s: Preserving the African American Experience in Pamlico County, N.C. #04007, Subseries: "U.14. Preserving the African American Experience in Pamlico County, N.C." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse U.15. Economic Justice in Charleston, S.C.

36 items.

These interviews, conducted by Jennifer O. Dixon, Willie Griffin, Rachel L. Martin, and Kieran W. Taylor in summer of 2008, examine economic justice issues in Charleston, S.C., since the 1960s. They explore a 1969 hospital strike with participants and political figures; a racial discrimination lawsuit against BellSouth; local and national politics, including Barack Obama's candidacy in the 2008 presidential election; desegregation and other challenges in public and higher education; the NAACP in South Carolina; the grassroots activism of economic justice advocates; and the establishment of the Gullah-Geechee Heritage Corridor.

Supplemental materials for these interviews include a news release, a suggested reading list, and interviewer notes for U-0395. They are available at the Southern Historical Collection; see folder U.15_supp.

Interviews

The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s: Economic Justice in Charleston, S.C. #04007, Subseries: "U.15. Economic Justice in Charleston, S.C." Interviews

Folder U15

Information about Economic Justice in Charleston, S.C. Project #04007, Subseries: "U.15. Economic Justice in Charleston, S.C." Folder U15

Includes a news release, a suggested reading list, and interviewer notes for U-0395.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse U.16. The Women's Movement in the South.

124 items.

The "Long Women's Movement in the American South" project builds on the SOHP's "Long Civil Rights Movement Initiative" (LCRM). Since 2005, SOHP researchers have conducted hundreds of interviews that document the deep roots of the black freedom struggle and demonstrate how activists sought to protect and extend the victories of the 1960s in the following decades. SOHP researchers have now turned to the strikingly under-studied story of second-wave feminism in the South. This project has thus far focused on the grassroots women's movement that developed in eastern Tennessee; the Appalachian movement of the 1970s, in which civil rights activism, unionization drives, and the War on Poverty interacted to produce a class-inflected feminist movement; reproductive rights and women's health; and women's fight for access to and equity in higher education. In the summer of 2010, fieldworkers and UNC graduate students Jennifer Donnally, Joey Fink, and Jessica Wilkerson, along with then Associate Director David Cline, conducted more than 40 interviews with women and men in eastern Tennessee, with occasional excursions to southwestern Virginia and southeastern Kentucky. The interviews trace feminist activism in rural and urban areas and showcase how widespread the women's movement was, as well as the different routes that led to the movement. Interviewees ranged from labor, civil rights, and environmental activists to artists, attorneys, clergy, and community and church activists. In the summer of 2011, fieldworkers and UNC graduate students Joey Fink and Jessica Wilkerson traveled back to Knoxville, Tenn., to further explore some of the themes from the previous trip to Tennessee. In over 30 interviews, they documented the experiences of reproductive rights advocates; female athletes; women who learned about feminism during high school; campaigners for the Equal Rights Amendment; environmental justice and community activists; and women who intersected with the movement and sympathized with it, even if they were not on the frontlines of activist organizations (interviews U-0437 to U-0499).

These interviews build on earlier interviews about school desegregation and economic justice by focusing on women's activism and gender dynamics, which were central to the freedom movement and the backlash against it. Topics include reproductive activism, both anti-abortion and pro-choice; the emergence of second-wave feminism in the mountain South and its links to the civil rights movement; the War on Poverty and challenges to job discrimination inspired by Title VII; and the entry of women into the University of North Carolina. A second group of interviews from Knoxville, Tenn., and surrounding areas was added by David Cline. These interviews focus on faith-based activism in Appalachia and its relation to feminism.

Interviews build on earlier projects on "Southern Women After Suffrage" and "Women's Leadership and Grassroots Activism in North Carolina" and are supported by funding from the Conrad Endowment, the Mellon Foundation, and the Kenan Trust.

There are three interviews (U-0504, U-0505, and U-0610) conducted under the direction of Dr. Jacquelyn Hall during the Spring 2011 and 2012 semesters at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Fourteen interviews in this series were conducted during the Summer 2012 semester in a seminar titled "The Women's Movement in the Triangle: Oral History and Civic Engagement" taught by Dr. Rachel Seidman and Ph.D. candidate Liz Lundeen of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. These interviews are with women involved in local organizations that primarily serve women, including Benevolence Farm, the Durham Crisis Response Center, the Pauli Murray Project, the North Carolina Council for Women, and Ladyslipper Music.

Five interviews (U-0643 through U-0647) were conducted by Jessie Wilkerson and Otha Jennifer Dixon at the "South Carolina Women: Their Lives and Times" symposium, 4 June 2009, and at the Southern Association for Women Historians' Southern Conference on Women's History, 4-6 June 2009, which were both held in Columbia, S.C. Supplemental materials for these interviews include conference and symposium notes, interviewee background notes, interviewer notes, and cover sheets and checklists. They are available at the Southern Historical Collection; see folder U.16a

Ten interviews (U-0793 through U-0802) were conducted in summer 2012 by Liz Lundeen, Ph.D. candidate in History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, with women throughout North Carolina.

Four interviews (U-0803 through U-0806) were conducted in summer 2012 by Evangeline Mee, an undergraduate student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She received the Francis Ferris Hall Undergraduate Award to conduct interviews with women activists in East Tennessee. These interviews focus on women's roles in environmental activistm, particularly with the Statewide Organizing for Community eMpowerment (formerly Save Our Cumberland Mountains) movement.

Nine interviews (U-1002 through U-1010) were conducted in summer 2013 as part of the Moxie Project women's leadership program for undergraduate students at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Student interviewers were interns at Triangle area women's organizations, and conducted interviews with women activists and leaders in the region as part of their service.

Interviews

The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s: The Women's Movement in the South #04007, Subseries: "U.16. The Women's Movement in the South." Interviews

Folder U16a

Information about The Women's Movement in the South Project #04007, Subseries: "U.16. The Women's Movement in the South." Folder U16a

Includes conference and symposium notes, interviewee background notes, interviewer notes, and cover sheets and checklists for interviews U-0643 through U-0647.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse U.17. The 50th Anniversary of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).

17 items.

In April 2010, former members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) gathered at Shaw University in Raleigh, N.C., to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the organization's founding. Interviewees examine their experiences and activities during the civil rights movement and the lasting effects of their participation on their lives.

Interviews

The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s: The 50th Anniversary of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) #04007, Subseries: "U.17. The 50th Anniversary of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC)." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse U.18. Heirs to a Fighting Tradition.

40 items.

The Heirs Project is a multi-phased oral history initiative that explores the stories and traditions of social justice activism in North Carolina through in-depth interviews with 14 highly respected activists and organizers. Selected for the integrity and high level of skill in their work dedicated to social justice, the interviewees represent a diversity of age, gender, sexuality, and ethnicity. These narratives capture the richness of a set of activists with powerful perspectives on social justice, political activism, and similar visions of the common good. The stories shared by this cohort of activists represent personal moments of transition and transformation, tales of empowerment and exhaustion, and organizing successes and defeats. The Project seeks to highlight the history of progressive political action in North Carolina through the stories and experiences of those who pushed for change.

Interviews

The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s: Heirs to a Fighting Tradition #04007, Subseries: "U.18. Heirs to a Fighting Tradition." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse U.19. Breaking New Ground.

327 items.

"Breaking New Ground: A History of African American Farm Owners Since the Civil War" is a collection of oral history interviews that focus on African American farm owners, and their history and experience since the Civil War. The project involved two cohorts of student researchers collecting digitally recorded interviews with landowners and their descendants throughout the American South. The interviews, collected in summer 2011 and summer 2012, compose the largest collection of oral history materials relating to the history of African American farm owners. Interviews in 2011 were conducted in Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina. Interviews in 2012 were conducted in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, Texas, and Washington, D.C. They will allow historians and future generations of families to listen to and understand rural life during the Jim Crow era, the impact of federal and state farm policies, and the role of farmers in the social, political and economic life of the region.

The project coordinators, Adrienne Petty and Mark Schultz, have decades of experience in conducting interviews in the South, and in researching the rural South. Schultz, a professor of history at Lewis University, is the author of The Rural Face of White Supremacy: Beyond Jim Crow, a study of race relations in Jim Crow Georgia. Petty, an assistant professor of history at the City College of New York, is the author of the study Standing Their Ground: Small Farmers in North Carolina Since 1880. Jacquelyn Dowd Hall, a leading figure in oral history in the United States, advised Petty and Schultz on the project. The project was funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Lowell Stahl Center for Real Estate Studies.

All materials were created by the Breaking New Ground fellows. Their written descriptions have been retained. Many interviews are accompanied by photographs, family trees, and other supplemental materials, located in folders U-0659_supp through U-0978_supp.

Interviews conducted by Priscilla M. Martinez in 2011 were deposited at the Baylor University Institute for Oral History and can be accessed here.

Interviews

The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s: Breaking New Ground #04007, Subseries: "U.19. Breaking New Ground." Interviews

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse V. The Hayti Spectrum: Documenting Negro Life of the 1920s, '30s, and '40s in Durham, N.C.

46 items.

The Hayti Spectrum oral history interviews, conducted by Brenda L. Williams, explore African American life from the 1920s to the 1960s in the Hayti community of Durham, N.C.

Transcripts are not available for these interviews; however, this collection is accompanied by 37 folders of supplementary materials compiled by the interviewer. These materials include newspaper clippings, church and funeral programs, photographs, and items related to some of the interviewees in the collection. Most original folder titles have been retained.

Interviews

The Hayti Spectrum: Documenting Negro Life of the 1920s, '30s, and '40s in Durham, N.C. #04007, Series: "V. The Hayti Spectrum: Documenting Negro Life of the 1920s, '30s, and '40s in Durham, N.C." Interviews

Folder V1

Hayti Memorabilia Inventory #04007, Series: "V. The Hayti Spectrum: Documenting Negro Life of the 1920s, '30s, and '40s in Durham, N.C." Folder V1

Folder V2

Alston, Lathrop (Lath) #04007, Series: "V. The Hayti Spectrum: Documenting Negro Life of the 1920s, '30s, and '40s in Durham, N.C." Folder V2

Folder V3

Baptist Supply Store #04007, Series: "V. The Hayti Spectrum: Documenting Negro Life of the 1920s, '30s, and '40s in Durham, N.C." Folder V3

Folder V4

Bryant, R. Kelly #04007, Series: "V. The Hayti Spectrum: Documenting Negro Life of the 1920s, '30s, and '40s in Durham, N.C." Folder V4

Folder V5

Caesar, Shirley #04007, Series: "V. The Hayti Spectrum: Documenting Negro Life of the 1920s, '30s, and '40s in Durham, N.C." Folder V5

Folder V6

Clement, Josephine Dobbs #04007, Series: "V. The Hayti Spectrum: Documenting Negro Life of the 1920s, '30s, and '40s in Durham, N.C." Folder V6

Folder V7

Clubs and Leisure #04007, Series: "V. The Hayti Spectrum: Documenting Negro Life of the 1920s, '30s, and '40s in Durham, N.C." Folder V7

Folder V8

Culture and Traditions #04007, Series: "V. The Hayti Spectrum: Documenting Negro Life of the 1920s, '30s, and '40s in Durham, N.C." Folder V8

Folder V9