Collection Number: 01167

Collection Title: E. B. Jeffress Papers, 1860-1955

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held in the Wilson Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the World Wide Web. See the Duplication Policy section for more information.


This collection was rehoused under the sponsorship of a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Office of Preservation, Washington, D.C., 1990-1992.

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Size 3.0 feet of linear shelf space (approximately 3300 items)
Abstract Edwin Bedford Jeffress, owner of the Greensboro Daily News; mayor of Greensboro, N.C., from 1925 to 1929; and member of the North Carolina General Assembly from Guilford County in 1931. In May 1931, he was appointed chair of the State Highway Commission by Governor O. Max Gardner. When the North Carolina State Highway and Public Works Commission was formed in 1933, Jeffress was named chair by Governor John C. B. Ehringhaus. His tenure was cut short, however, by an illness that rendered him a semi-invalid for the rest of his life, much of which he spent at the Carolina Inn in Chapel Hill, writing a history of North Carolina. The collection includes correspondence and other papers chiefly relating to E. B. Jeffress's public life. Beginning in 1921 and continuing throughout the collection, there are items relating to Jeffress's managerial duties at the Greensboro Daily News. Materials from the period 1925-1929 document Jeffress's activities as mayor of Greensboro, particularly his interests in taxes, highway construction, airmail delivery, and bonds to finance various civic improvements. Correspondence about highway construction, consolidation of the state's public universities, prison reform, electric power rate hikes, Democratic Party politics, and taxes documents Jeffress's tenure in the North Carolina General Assembly. There are also materials relating to Jeffress's activities as chair of the North Carolina State Highway Commission and its successor, the State Highway and Public Works Commission. Many of the letters are to and from persons interested in specific road projects. Other letters relate to prison problems, which were closely allied to road issues, since many roads were built using convict labor. Also included are a typed copy of Jeffress's unpublished manuscript "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955" and a few photographs.
Creator Jeffress, E. B. (Edwin Bedford), 1887-1961.
Language English
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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Information For Users

Restrictions to Access
No restrictions. Open for research.
Copyright Notice
Copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.
Preferred Citation
[Identification of item], in the E. B. Jeffress Papers #1167, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Acquisitions Information
Received from E. B. Jeffress of Chapel Hill, N.C., 1946-1955.
Sensitive Materials Statement
Manuscript collections and archival records may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations, the North Carolina Public Records Act (N.C.G.S. § 132 1 et seq.), and Article 7 of the North Carolina State Personnel Act (Privacy of State Employee Personnel Records, N.C.G.S. § 126-22 et seq.). Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill assumes no responsibility.
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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subject Headings

The following terms from Library of Congress Subject Headings suggest topics, persons, geography, etc. interspersed through the entire collection; the terms do not usually represent discrete and easily identifiable portions of the collection--such as folders or items.

Clicking on a subject heading below will take you into the University Library's online catalog.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Biographical Information

Edwin Bedford Jeffress was born in Canton, N.C., the son of Charles James (d. 1933) and Maria Love Osborne Jeffress (d. 1934). He was graduated from Asheville High School in 1903 and entered the University of North Carolina in that same year. At UNC, he earned a Phi Beta Kappa key for scholarship and an Omicron Delta Kappa key for leadership. During his last two years, he was an assistant instructor in geology. In 1907, he received his B.A. degree with a major in general science.

Jeffress taught at the Bingham Military School in Asheville from 1907 to 1909, working during the summers as a reporter for the Asheville Gazette News. In 1909, he quit his teaching job to become a full-time member of the Gazette News staff. Two years later, the Gazette News acquired the Greensboro Daily News. Jeffress is believed to have been the first reporter to serve as staff correspondent in the state capital, where he wrote special dispatches for both the Asheville and the Greensboro paper.

In late 1911, Jeffress purchased a half interest in the Greensboro Daily News and assumed the role of business manager. In 1918, he became president of the Greensboro News Company. The growth in circulation and influence of the Greensboro Daily News, and, later, its afternoon counterpart, the Greensboro Record, was largely attributed to Jeffress. In 1934, Jeffress became seriously ill; subsequent brain surgery resulted in a general incapacitation until his death in 1961. Although he experienced some difficulty getting around, he remained alert and lived out his days at the Carolina Inn in Chapel Hill.

During his years in public life, Jeffress demonstrated a deep interest in everything that concerned the growth and development of Greensboro. From the first, he was an energetic member of the Chamber of Commerce, serving as president 1921-1922. He also served on the city council, and, as mayor of Greensboro from 1925 to 1929, did much to enhance the city, including playing an important part in establishing the Greensboro-High Point Airport.

Elected to the North Carolina General Assembly, Jeffress proved to be an effective and energetic legislator in the 1931 session, where he served on the on the Commission to Study the Prison Situation in North Carolina and was chair of the House Committee on Reorganization of State Government. Jeffress also worked on the transfer of county roads and county prisoners from local to state control under the State Highway Commission, the consolidation of the three state institutions of higher learning into the Greater University of North Carolina, and other landmark legislation. In May 1931, he was appointed chair of the State Highway Commission by Governor O. Max Gardner. In 1933, the state's prisons were added to the Highway Commission's responsibilities. When the North Carolina State Highway and Public Works Commission was formed in 1933, Jeffress was named chair by Governor John C. B. Ehringhaus, but his tenure was cut short by illness.

Jeffress married Louise Bond Adams on 17 July 1913, and they had five children: Rebecca, who married Winfield S. Barney Jr.; twins Edward Bedford Jr., and Charles (Carl) Osborne; Mary Louise, who married A. Bradford McLean; and Sarah Clark Tate, who married Bruce O. Jolly.

(Adapted from the note by C. Sylvester Green in the Dictionary of North Carolina Biography , Volume 3, 1988.)

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Scope and Content

The papers of E. B. Jeffress, newspaperman, historian, politican, and public servant of Greensboro, N.C., includes correspondence and other papers chiefly relating to E. B. Jeffress's public life. Beginning in 1921 and continuing throughout the collection, there are items relating to Jeffress's managerial duties at the Greensboro Daily News. Materials from the period 1925-1929 document Jeffress's activities as mayor of Greensboro, particularly his interests in taxes, highway construction, airmail delivery, and bonds to finance various civic improvements. Correspondence about highway construction, consolidation of the state's public universities, prison reform, electric power rate hikes, Democratic Party politics, and taxes documents Jeffress's tenure in the North Carolina General Assembly. There are also materials relating to Jeffress's activities as chair of the North Carolina State Highway Commission and its successor, the State Highway and Public Works Commission. Many of the letters are to and from persons interested in specific road projects. Other letters relate to prison problems, which were closely allied to road issues, since many roads were built using convict labor. Also included are a typed copy of Jeffress's unpublished manuscript "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955" and a few photographs.

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Contents list

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 1. Correspondence, 1870-1948 and undated.

About 3250 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

Chiefly letters relating to E. B. Jeffress's career in public service, first as mayor of Greensboro, then as state legislator, and finally as chair of the State Highway and Public Works Commission.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.1. 1870-1930.

About 600 items.

Items from 1870 consist of two receipts relating to the account of a Jeffress family member with Yancy & Vaughan for purchase of drygoods, chickens, and a cow. E. B. Jeffress materials start in 1921 with items relating to his managerial duties at the Greensboro Daily News. There are also a few items relating to the Greensboro Chamber of Commerce and to the Holy Trinity Episcopal Church of which Jeffress was a member. In December 1924, there are many letters about the opening of a new plant for the Greensboro Daily News. While there are a few 1925-1929 items relating to the newspaper, most document Jeffress's activities as mayor of Greensboro, particularly his interests in taxes, highway construction, airmail delivery, and bonds to finance various civic improvements. Letters document mayoral responsibilities, which apparently included everything from granting permission for groups to picnic on city property to directing investigations of police misconduct. Although Jeffress was mayor through 1929, there are few items after 1926.

Also included are a small number of personal letters, including one, dated 29 July 1929, from Jeffress to his daughter Rebecca, in which he discussed taking up golf. There are also a few letters about personal business deals in which Jeffress was involved, including a telegram, dated 30 October 1929, from Jeffress to a partner in a stock deal that reads, "Have you noticed the stock market this week?"

Folder 1

1870 #01167, Subseries: "1.1. 1870-1930." Folder 1

Folder 2

1921-1922 #01167, Subseries: "1.1. 1870-1930." Folder 2

Folder 3-7

Folder 3

Folder 4

Folder 5

Folder 6

Folder 7

1924 #01167, Subseries: "1.1. 1870-1930." Folder 3-7

Folder 8-13

Folder 8

Folder 9

Folder 10

Folder 11

Folder 12

Folder 13

1925 #01167, Subseries: "1.1. 1870-1930." Folder 8-13

Folder 14-22

Folder 14

Folder 15

Folder 16

Folder 17

Folder 18

Folder 19

Folder 20

Folder 21

Folder 22

1926 #01167, Subseries: "1.1. 1870-1930." Folder 14-22

Folder 23

1927-1928 #01167, Subseries: "1.1. 1870-1930." Folder 23

Folder 24

1929-1930 #01167, Subseries: "1.1. 1870-1930." Folder 24

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.2. January-April 1931.

About 750 items.

Materials chiefly relating to Jeffress's tenure as member of the North Carolina General Assembly from Guilford County. The bulk of the items are letters from constituents and lobbying groups, but there is also correspondence with other legislators and government officials. Issues include transportation, highway construction, consolidation of the state's universities, prison reform, electric power rate hikes, and taxes. Folder 27 contains letters from store owners and workers opposed to "any and all forms of sales tax."

There are also a few items relating to the Greensboro Daily News and to private business deals. Among Jeffress's correspondents was Hariette Hammer Walker, editor of the Courier of Asheboro, N.C.

Folder 25-58

Folder 25

Folder 26

Folder 27

Folder 28

Folder 29

Folder 30

Folder 31

Folder 32

Folder 33

Folder 34

Folder 35

Folder 36

Folder 37

Folder 38

Folder 39

Folder 40

Folder 41

Folder 42

Folder 43

Folder 44

Folder 45

Folder 46

Folder 47

Folder 48

Folder 49

Folder 50

Folder 51

Folder 52

Folder 53

Folder 54

Folder 55

Folder 56

Folder 57

Folder 58

January-April 1931 #01167, Subseries: "1.2. January-April 1931." Folder 25-58

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.3. May 1931-1934.

About 1800 items.

Materials chiefly relating to Jeffress's activities as chair of the North Carolina State Highway Commission, to which he was appointed by Governor O. Max Gardner, and its successor the State Highway and Public Works Commission, to which Governor John C. B. Ehringhaus appointed Jeffress. Many of the letters are to and from persons interested in specific road projects. Other letters relate to prison problems, which were closely allied to road issues, since many roads were built using convict labor. The North Carolina State Highway Commission included a prison department in 1932, and there are several reports on investigations of prison conditions in materials from that year. The State Highway and Public Works Commission also had jurisdiction over prisons. Beginning in February 1932, many items relate to efforts to get the $125,000,000 Emergency Appropriation for Federal Aid in Highway Construction bill through Congress.

Although most correspondence from this period is about highways and Jeffress's speaking engagements and attendance at public functions as chair of the Highway Commission, there are also some materials relating to newspaper work and to private business deals. In addition, there are a great number of inquiries from people seeking employment or recommendations for jobs. After April 1932, the volume of correspondence lessens considerably, as Jeffress was periodically ill or concerned with the death of his father in mid-July 1933 and his mother on 31 July 1934. Although there is no direct reference to the illness that ended Jeffress's active career, by September 1934, his secretary was signing his letters; it may be assumed that he fell ill sometime before then.

Folder 59-92

Folder 59

Folder 60

Folder 61

Folder 62

Folder 63

Folder 64

Folder 65

Folder 66

Folder 67

Folder 68

Folder 69

Folder 70

Folder 71

Folder 72

Folder 73

Folder 74

Folder 75

Folder 76

Folder 77

Folder 78

Folder 79

Folder 80

Folder 81

Folder 82

Folder 83

Folder 84

Folder 85

Folder 86

Folder 87

Folder 88

Folder 89

Folder 90

Folder 91

Folder 92

May-December 1931 #01167, Subseries: "1.3. May 1931-1934." Folder 59-92

Folder 93-116

Folder 93

Folder 94

Folder 95

Folder 96

Folder 97

Folder 98

Folder 99

Folder 100

Folder 101

Folder 102

Folder 103

Folder 104

Folder 105

Folder 106

Folder 107

Folder 108

Folder 109

Folder 110

Folder 111

Folder 112

Folder 113

Folder 114

Folder 115

Folder 116

1932 #01167, Subseries: "1.3. May 1931-1934." Folder 93-116

Folder 117-136

Folder 117

Folder 118

Folder 119

Folder 120

Folder 121

Folder 122

Folder 123

Folder 124

Folder 125

Folder 126

Folder 127

Folder 128

Folder 129

Folder 130

Folder 131

Folder 132

Folder 133

Folder 134

Folder 135

Folder 136

1933 #01167, Subseries: "1.3. May 1931-1934." Folder 117-136

Folder 137-141

Folder 137

Folder 138

Folder 139

Folder 140

Folder 141

1934 #01167, Subseries: "1.3. May 1931-1934." Folder 137-141

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.4. 1935-1948 and undated.

About 100 items.

Chiefly letters relating to routine newspaper work, mainly about advertising copy. Early in 1935, there is a letter mentioning Jeffress's retirement from the State Highway and Public Works Commission due to bad health. Many subsequent letter note the progress of his recovery. A few letters relate to political affairs, particularly, in 1936, to Jeffress's support of Clyde R. Hoey for governor. Letters from 1938 show sporadic activity in the Greensboro Chamber of Commerce, and materials from the 1940s relate chiefly to club participation and repairs to Jeffress's Greensboro home. By 1946, Jeffress's address was the Carolina Inn, but materials in this collection do not document his activities while a resident there.

Folder 142

1935 #01167, Subseries: "1.4. 1935-1948 and undated." Folder 142

Folder 143

1936 #01167, Subseries: "1.4. 1935-1948 and undated." Folder 143

Folder 144

1937 #01167, Subseries: "1.4. 1935-1948 and undated." Folder 144

Folder 145

1938 #01167, Subseries: "1.4. 1935-1948 and undated." Folder 145

Folder 146

1939 #01167, Subseries: "1.4. 1935-1948 and undated." Folder 146

Folder 147

1940 #01167, Subseries: "1.4. 1935-1948 and undated." Folder 147

Folder 148

1941 #01167, Subseries: "1.4. 1935-1948 and undated." Folder 148

Folder 149

1942 #01167, Subseries: "1.4. 1935-1948 and undated." Folder 149

Folder 150

1943-1948 #01167, Subseries: "1.4. 1935-1948 and undated." Folder 150

Folder 151

Undated and fragments #01167, Subseries: "1.4. 1935-1948 and undated." Folder 151

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 2. Other Papers, 1860-1955 and undated.

About 20 items.

A typescript of "The Modern State Of North Carolina, 1776-1955," by E. B. Jeffress; an account book, 1860-1862; and miscellaneous items.

The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages

In his narrative, Jeffress largely emphasized the development of transportation and communication, the work of great political leaders, constitutional and legal developments in government administration, and the evolution of public education. Most of the early chapters present fairly standard, popularly written, state history. The later chapters, however, are a bit more lively, dealing with politicians and events with which Jeffress himself had been associated. Included in folder 152 is part of a 1955 letter from Lambert Davis, director of the University of North Carolina Press, declining to publish the manuscript. Chapter titles are listed below; titles and order remain as received.

Folder 152

The Physical Characteristics #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 152

European Influence in Discovery and Settlement of America #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 152

The Sandy Creek Organization #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 152

The Logistics of Revolution #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 152

Folder 153

The Post Office and its Effect of Transportation #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 153

The Trade Winds and Barbados and Caribbean #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 153

The Constitutional Developments #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 153

The Buncombe Turnpike #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 153

England in Elizabeth's Time #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 153

The Piedmont and the State of Manufacturing #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 153

The Convention of 1935 and Railroad Era #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 153

Manhood Suffrage #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 153

Dismal Swamp Canal #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 153

Folder 154

The Civil War Period #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 154

Post Civil War, Debt Adjustment #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 154

Return to Union #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 154

Constitutional Convention #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 154

Sale of Western North Carolina Railroad, 1880 #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 154

White Supremacy Campaign, 1890 #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 154

Early Libraries and Culture in North Carolina #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 154

Governor Vance, 1877-1894; Period of Fiscal Reconstruction #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 154

Farmer Alliance, 1880-1892: Agrarian Discontent #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 154

A. W. Tourgee, 1838-1905 #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 154

Folder 155

Reverend Walker and Welfare Section, 1817-1893 #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 155

W. B. Rodman, 1873-1893 #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 155

Calvin H. Wiley, Superintendent of Schools, Pre-War Period #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 155

College Aid in Roads: Land Grant Colleges Factor #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 155

Guilford County as Example #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 155

Charles B. Aycock, A Civic Leader of Great Power #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 155

Highway Agitation, 1893-1900 #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 155

R. B. Glenn, 1905-1909 #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 155

Three-in-One Convention, 1908 #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 155

W. W. Kitchin, 1909-1913 #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 155

Locke Craige, Highway Needs Dramatized #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 155

Folder 156

Early Days in Chapel Hill #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 156

An Early Automobile Trip #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 156

Bickett Era, 1917-1921 #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 156

Post Office Service, 1789-1829 #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 156

Federal Aid for Highways, 1916 #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 156

R. L. Doughton Speech for Federal Aid #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 156

Ford's Kitchen Laboratory Produces the Puff That Was to Change the Habits of a Nation, 1890 #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 156

Folder 157

Frank Pages Takes Helm #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 157

Year of Decision, 1919 #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 157

Daniel Russell, 1897-1901 #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 157

Cameron Morrison and 1921 Program #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 157

The Old Salt Road #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 157

Angus W. McLean, Budgeteer #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 157

Folder 158

O. Max Gardner, 1929-1933: Road Law of 1931 #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 158

Folder 159

The Gardner Road Program, 1931 #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 159

Gardner Financial Crisis: Faith Paid Off #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 159

Ehringhaus: Blue Ridge Parkway, 1933-1937 #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 159

The Angus McLean School Bill, 1931 #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 159

Clyde R. Hoey, 1937-1941: Highways and Administration #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 159

Folder 160

J. M. Broughton, 1941-1945 #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 160

R. Gregg Cherry, 1945-1949 #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 160

W. Kerr Scott, 1949-1953: Rural Branch Head Boys #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 160

William B. Umstead, 1953-1954 #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 160

Luther Hodges, 1954 #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 160

The Modern State of North Carolina Summary #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 160

Development of the Modern State #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 160

Bibliography #01167, Series: "The Modern State of North Carolina, 1776-1955 (typescript), about 350 pages" Folder 160

Folder 161

Folder number not used #01167, Series: "2. Other Papers, 1860-1955 and undated." Folder 161

Oversize Volume SV-1167/1

Account book, 1860-1862, about 800 pages #01167, Series: "2. Other Papers, 1860-1955 and undated." SV-1167/1

The book contains accounts of of E. B. Jeffress (1823-1891), grandfather of E. B. Jeffress (1887-1961), for purchases of general merchandise in South Boston, Va.

Folder 162-164

Folder 162

Folder 163

Folder 164

Miscellaneous materials, including notes on various subjects, fragments of writings, and other items #01167, Series: "2. Other Papers, 1860-1955 and undated." Folder 162-164

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 3. Pictures, 1930s.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Items Separated

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Processing Information

Processed by: Roslyn Holdzkom, October 1992

Encoded by: Roslyn Holdzkom, November 2006

This collection was rehoused under the sponsorship of a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Office of Preservation, Washington, D.C., 1990-1992.

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