Access to this collection is limited.

To inquire about using this collection, contact us at wilsonlibrary@unc.edu. For details, please see the restrictions.

Collection Number: 05778

Collection Title: Brock Family Papers, 1801-1904 (bulk 1840s-1880s)

This collection has access restrictions. For details, please see the restrictions.


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Size 3.0 feet of linear shelf space (approximately 2500 items)
Abstract The Brock Family Papers, 1801-1904, pertain to the Brock Family of Jones County, N.C., who were white farmers who owned land and enslaved people until the Civil War. Most of the papers are related to Benjamin Brock Sr. (1829-1905). The collection consists of accounting records, including receipts for goods, medical, and other services, chiefly procured in New Bern, N.C.; estate settlements; deeds; indentures; and bills of sale of enslaved people. Correspondence and other records document Brock's household purchases, farming habits, and how he educated his children. Of note is a cipher book. Reconstruction era and later records indicate that formerly enslaved people worked as hired hands and sharecroppers on Brock's properties. The Kinsey, Franks, and Koonce families are also documented.
Creator Brock (Family : Jones County, N.C.)
Language English
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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Information For Users

Restrictions to Access
This collection is not available for immediate or same day access. Please contact Research and Instructional Service staff at wilsonlibrary@unc.edu to discuss options for consulting these materials.
Restrictions to Use
No usage restrictions.
Copyright Notice
Copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.
Preferred Citation
[Identification of item], in the Brock Family Papers #05778, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Acquisitions Information
Received from Larry Sappington in July 2018 (Acc. 103385).
Sensitive Materials Statement
Manuscript collections and archival records may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations, the North Carolina Public Records Act (N.C.G.S. § 132 1 et seq.), and Article 7 of the North Carolina State Personnel Act (Privacy of State Employee Personnel Records, N.C.G.S. § 126-22 et seq.). Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill assumes no responsibility.
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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subject Headings

The following terms from Library of Congress Subject Headings suggest topics, persons, geography, etc. interspersed through the entire collection; the terms do not usually represent discrete and easily identifiable portions of the collection--such as folders or items.

Clicking on a subject heading below will take you into the University Library's online catalog.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Biographical Information

The Brock family of Jones County, N.C., were white farmers who owned land and enslaved people until the Civil War. During Reconstruction and until the early 1900s, the Brock family hired hands and rented out land to sharecroppers, some of whom previously were enslaved on the farm. Benjamin Brock Sr. (1829-1905) also served as an executor for the estates of several individuals and as the guardian for several other underage heirs.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Scope and Content

The Brock Family Papers, 1801-1904, pertain to the Brock Family of Jones County, N.C., who were white farmers who owned land and enslaved people until the Civil War. Most of the papers are related to Benjamin Brock Sr. (1829-1905). The earliest papers in the collection date to 1801, however the bulk of the collection spans the 1840s to the 1880s. Most of the collection is accounting records, including receipts for goods, medical, and other services, chiefly procured in New Bern, N.C.; estate settlements; deeds; indentures; and bills of sale of enslaved people. Records of enslaved people often include name, gender, and estimated age. Other records document Brock's household purchases and how he educated his children. Of note is a cipher book. At least 15 memorandum books detail Brock's farming habits, with receipts and notes about other plantation activities (1853-1878; 1882-1904). Reconstruction era and later records indicate that formerly enslaved people worked as hired hands and sharecroppers on Brock's properties. The Kinsey, Franks, and Koonce families are also documented.

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Preliminary Box list

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Brock Family Papers, 1801-1904 (bulk 1840s-1880s).

2500 items.

Restriction: This collection is not available for immediate or same day access. Please contact Research and Instructional Service staff at wilsonlibrary@unc.edu to discuss options for consulting these materials.

The Brock Family Papers, 1801-1904, pertain to the Brock Family of Jones County, N.C., who were white farmers who owned land and enslaved people until the Civil War. Most of the papers are related to Benjamin Brock Sr. (1829-1905). The earliest papers in the collection date to 1801, however the bulk of the collection spans the 1840s to the 1880s. Most of the collection is accounting records, including receipts for goods, medical, and other services, chiefly procured in New Bern, N.C.; estate settlements; deeds; indentures; and bills of sale of enslaved people. Records of enslaved people often include name, gender, and estimated age. Other records document Brock's household purchases and how he educated his children. Of note is a cipher book. At least 15 memorandum books detail Brock's farming habits, with receipts and notes about other plantation activities (1853-1878; 1882-1904). Reconstruction era and later records indicate that formerly enslaved people worked as hired hands and sharecroppers on Brock's properties. The Kinsey, Franks, and Koonce families are also documented.

Box 1-2

Box 1

Box 2

Account records and other materials, 1801-1904 #05778, Series: "Brock Family Papers, 1801-1904 (bulk 1840s-1880s)." Box 1-2

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Processing Information

Processed by: Lydia Neuroth and Biff Hollingsworth, September 2018

Encoded by: Nancy Kaiser, September 2018

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